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'Game of Thrones' co-stars Kit Harington, Rose Leslie to wed

Former "Game of Thrones" co-stars Kit Harington and Rose Leslie are set to marry at the bride's family castle in Scotland.

Fans of the show gathered outside 900-year-old Wardhill Castle in northeast Scotland, where the two British actors are due to wed Saturday.

The pair, who are both 31, met in 2012 on the set of the HBO fantasy series, and played a couple as the characters Jon Snow and Ygritte. Leslie left the cast in 2014 and currently stars in U.S. legal drama "The Good Fight."

The couple announced their engagement with a notice in the Times of London newspaper in September.

The bride's father, Sebastian Leslie, said Saturday he was "absolutely thrilled" about the wedding. He said "it's an absolutely lovely day for us."

Netflix executive apologizes, resigns after using racial slurs

Netflix’s chief communications officer apologized and resigned after using a racial slur in front of colleagues on at least two occasions, CNN reported Friday.

>> Read more trending news

Jonathan Friedland apologized on Twitter and said he was leaving the company after seven years.

"I feel awful about the distress this lapse caused to people at a company I love and where I want everyone to feel included and appreciated," Friedland tweeted.

Variety obtained a copy of a memo Netflix CEO Reed Hastings sent to employees to explain the situation. A copy was tweeted by The Hollywood Reporter.

The memo referenced an incident from several months ago when Friedland used a racial slur while meeting with Netflix public relations staff, CNN reported.

He used the same slur a few days later in front of two black employees at Netflix’s human resources department while discussing the first incident, Hastings wrote in his memo.

"Many of us have worked closely with Jonathan for a long time, and have mixed emotions,” Hastings wrote. “Unfortunately, his lack of judgment in this area was too big for him to remain."

Friedland joined Netflix as vice president of communications in 2011 and assumed duties as chief communications officer the following year, Variety reported.

Netflix declined comment.

Superman trades cape for badge: Dean Cain sworn in as reserve police officer in Idaho

Superman has changed uniforms.

>> Read more trending news

Actor Dean Cain, who played the Man of Steel in the show “Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman,” was recently sworn in as a reserve officer in Idaho, Fox News reported.

Cain, 51, was sworn in as a reserve for the St. Anthony Police Department, Fox News reported. The Idaho State Police tweeted the news Tuesday, showing a series of photos of the swearing-in ceremony.

Former Pantera drummer Vinnie Paul dead at 54

Drummer Vinnie Paul, a founding member of the heavy metal band Pantera, died Friday night, the band announced on Facebook. He was 54.

>> Read more trending news 

"Vincent Paul Abbott aka Vinnie Paul has passed away," Pantera wrote on Facebook. "Paul is best known for his work as the drummer in the bands Pantera and Hellyeah. No further details are available at this time. The family requests you please respect their privacy during this time."

No cause of death was given.

"Can’t believe it. R.I.P. to our brother Vinnie Paul," Anthrax tweeted, while Paul Stanley of KISS wrote, "So sad to hear of the death of Vinnie Paul. Loved when Pantera did shows with us and in later years Vinnie was always front and center at all KISS shows. RIP and condolences to his family."

>> PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2018

Paul, born Vincent Paul Abbott in Abilene, Texas, formed Pantera in 1981 with his brother, “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott and bassist Rex Brown, Rolling Stone reported.

Pantera led the charge of heavy metal bands during the 1990s with albums like “Cowboys From Hell,” “Vulgar Display of Power” and “Far Beyond Driven.”

The band split in 2003, Rolling Stone reported.

The Abbott brothers formed Damageplan in 2004, but the band’s tenure ended when Dimebag Abbott was shot and killed onstage by a fan in 2004, Rolling Stone reported.

Paul joined Hellyeah in 2006.

AP Source: J. Cole to perform at BET Awards

J. Cole is set to perform at Sunday's BET Awards.

A person familiar with the awards show, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the person was not allowed to discuss the plans publicly, tells The Associated Press on Friday that the rapper will perform at the show.

Nicki Minaj, DJ Khaled, Migos, Snoop Dogg, Janelle Monae, Miguel, 2 Chainz and H.E.R. are also performing. Oscar winner Jamie Foxx is set to host.

J. Cole, who released his fifth album, "KOD," to critical acclaim in April, is nominated for best male hip hop artist, where he will compete with Jay-Z, Kendrick Lamar, Drake and DJ Khaled.

The BET Awards will air live from the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles.

DuVernay scores another milestone for black female directors

Filmmaker Ava DuVernay has checked off another milestone for black female directors. This week her film "A Wrinkle in Time" crossed the $100 million mark domestically, a first for a black woman. The film got a late-game boost playing as a double feature at drive-in theaters with the record-breaking "Incredibles 2" this past weekend.

DuVernay said on Instagram that she may be the first but will not be the last.

DuVernay was also the first black woman to get a budget of over $100 million to direct a film. "A Wrinkle in Time" cost around $103 million to make.

The Disney film has now grossed over $132.4 million worldwide, but with marketing costs well over $100 million, "A Wrinkle in Time" is also still not in the black.

Cohen's photo with Tom Arnold fuels Trump tape speculation

President Donald Trump's former longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen retweeted a photo of himself with comedian Tom Arnold, who is working on a TV show to hunt down recordings of the president, fueling speculation Friday that Cohen has secret tapes of Trump and is willing to share them.

Last month, Vice Media announced that Arnold would be featured in a new show called "The Hunt for the Trump Tapes" and would investigate rumored recordings of the president.

Arnold told NBC News on Friday that he met with Cohen at the Lowes Regency Hotel in Manhattan and they discussed the new show.

"We've been on the other side of the table and now we're on the same side," Arnold told NBC. "It's on! I hope he (Trump) sees the picture of me and Michael Cohen and it haunts his dreams."

Arnold tweeted the photo with Cohen and the caption "I love New York" on Thursday night and Cohen retweeted it without comment.

Later Friday, Cohen tweeted that he had a "chance, public encounter" in the hotel's lobby and that Arnold asked to take a selfie.

"Not spending the weekend together, did not discuss being on his show nor did we discuss @POTUS. #done #ridiculous," Cohen tweeted.

The idea for the show, which is set to air on Viceland later this year, came about after the release of the "Access Hollywood" tape during the 2016 presidential election, which captured Trump bragging about grabbing women's genitals. In announcing the show last month, Vice said Arnold would "draw on his high-profile network of celebrity friends, entertainment executives, and crew members he's met over more than 35 years in showbiz to dig for evidence on Trump's most incriminating moments."

"I say to Michael: 'Guess what? We're taking Trump down together,' and he's so tired he's like, 'OK,' and his wife is like, 'OK, (expletive) Trump,'" Arnold told NBC.

Arnold tweeted Friday to clarify that it was him who said he was teaming with Cohen to "take down" Trump and that Cohen was not being paid by Vice. Cohen replied, "Thank you Tom for correcting the record."

For more than a decade, Cohen was Trump's personal lawyer and fixer, and he has long been a key power player in the Trump Organization and a fixture in Trump's political life. He regularly threatened lawsuits against those who could pose a challenge to Trump, and a day before the FBI raided his office and hotel room, he tweeted, "I will always protect my POTUS."

Last week, Trump said he hadn't spoken with Cohen "in a long time" and said, "He's not my lawyer anymore, but I always liked Michael."

Cohen is under investigation by federal officials in New York. His home, office and hotel room were raided by the FBI in April as part of a probe into his business dealings. Investigators are also looking into a $130,000 payment made as part of a confidentiality agreement with porn actress Stormy Daniels, who alleges she had an affair with Trump in 2006, which Trump denies. She is suing both Cohen and Trump in an attempt to invalidate the nondisclosure agreement.

Daniels' former attorney, Keith Davidson, has sued Cohen and alleges he illegally recorded their telephone calls when Davidson represented Daniels. The lawsuit, filed earlier this month in Los Angeles, provided no proof to substantiate the claims and no details on exactly when the calls were recorded.

___

Submit a confidential tip to The Associated Press at www.ap.org/tips .

Jailed filmmaker in Russia loses 44 pounds on hunger strike

A lawyer for a Ukrainian filmmaker who has been on hunger strike for more than a month in a Russian prison says his client has lost about 20 kilograms (44 pounds) and is severely weak.

Oleg Sentsov, a vehement opponent of Russia's 2014 annexation of Crimea from Ukraine, is serving a 20-year sentence on a conviction for planning terrorist acts. He denies the charges. Friday marked the 40th day of his hunger strike.

Lawyer Dmitry Dinze visited Sentsov on Friday and found him "very weak, very pale." He told The Associated Press that Sentsov is receiving vitamins and nutrients intravenously but has dropped from 97 kilograms (214 pounds) to about 77 kilograms (170 pounds).

Western nations have urged Sentsov's release. Dinze said the filmmaker will not request a pardon and insists on being released.

Anthony Bourdain toxicology report released

Chef and author Anthony Bourdain did not have narcotics in his body when he died on June 8, a French judicial official told The New York Times.

Bourdain, 61, was found dead in a hotel in a small village in France on June 8.

He was staying in Kaysersberg, a small village in the Alsace region of France, filming a new episode of his CNN show “Parts Unknown.”

Police ruled his death as suicide by hanging.

Local prosecutors say Bourdain, who was open about his lifelong struggle with drugs and alcohol, was not intoxicated when he died.

“No trace of narcotics, no trace of any toxic products, no trace of medicines, no trace of alcohol,” prosecutor Christian de Rocquigny told Reuters.

>> Read more trending news 

Bourdain skipped dinner the night before his body was discovered, The New York Times reports

When he did not arrive for breakfast with Eric Ripert, Bourdain’s close friend and chef of Le Bernardin in New York, a hotel receptionist went to his room to check on him and found his body.

Bourdain was cremated in France.

His remains and travel belongings have been sent to his younger brother, Christopher.

Gladys Bourdain, Anthony Bourdain’s mother, told the New York Times that the family will likely hold “a small, private ceremony of some kind.”

Italian actress Asia Argento remembered her boyfriend Anthony Bourdain on Twitter Friday, marking two weeks since his death.

“Two weeks without you,” she tweeted, along with a smiling photo of them together.

Central African Republic minister says Becker passport fake

Central African Republic's foreign minister says a reported diplomatic passport for Boris Becker appears to be a fake and the prosecutor general will investigate.

The retired German tennis star claims that his role as Central African Republic's attache to the European Union on sporting, cultural and humanitarian affairs gives him diplomatic immunity from bankruptcy proceedings in Britain.

But the African nation's foreign minister, Charles Armel Doubane, rejected the passport that is said to be Becker's in comments to Radio Ndeke-Luka.

Presidential spokesman Albert Yaloké Mokpeme said the head of state had never appointed Becker to the post. The presidency has said that "we are not custodians of the physical and moral integrity of this gentleman."

Prosecutor general Eric Didier Tambo has said there will be an investigation.

Becker told the BBC that he was given the passport by the country's ambassador and believed it to be genuine.

"I have a real passport," he said.

He said he would be "very happy" to visit the Central African Republic "and to speak to people personally about how we can move forward and how we can resolve this misunderstanding and this confusion."

Reports: Michael Jackson's father Joe Jackson hospitalized with terminal cancer, 'doesn't have long'

Joe Jackson, the patriarch of the Jackson family, doesn’t have much longer to live, according to one of his sons, Jermaine Jackson.

According to the Daily Mail, Joe Jackson, 88, has an “undisclosed terminal illness” and his family members alleged that his handlers are not allowing them to see him. TMZ reported that he is in a hospital with terminal cancer.

>> Read more trending news 

“No one knew what was going on -- we shouldn’t have to beg, plead, and argue to see our own father, especially at a time like this,” Jermaine Jackson told the Daily Mail. “We have been hurting. We were not being told where he was and couldn’t get the full picture. Even from the doctor. My mother was worried sick.”

Jermaine Jackson said family members just want to be near their patriarch during this time.

“He’s very very frail. He doesn’t have long. The family needs to be by his bedside -- that’s our only intention in his final days,” he said.

According to the Daily Mail, Jackson family matriarch Katherine, her daughters Rebbie and Joh'Vonnie and Rebbie’s daughter Yashi Brown were able to visit Joe Jackson in Las Vegas Tuesday. TMZ reported that Katherine Jackson and some children and grandchildren were able to come by for a hospital visit. It is not clear from the Daily Mail’s report if family members visited Joe Jackson at his Las Vegas home, at the hospital or both.

The British tabloid claims that, according to a source close to Janet Jackson, she has also been denied access to her father.

No other members of the Jackson family have publicly commented on the reports.

Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa leaves hospital after fall

Nobel Literature laureate Mario Vargas Llosa has been discharged from a Madrid hospital, 24 hours after sustaining light injuries in a fall at home.

The 82-year-old Peruvian writer left the Spanish capital's Hospital Ruber Juan Bravo on Friday.

Vargas Llosa spent the night under observation after complaining about severe pain in a bruised left buttock. He also sustained a slight head injury in Thursday's fall.

Spanish news agency Europa Press says the novelist went to his Madrid home to continue his recovery.

He is the author of "Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter," ''The Green House," and "The War at the End of the World," among other works.

The Monkees postpone dates after Mike Nesmith became ill

The Monkees have postponed the last four dates of their tour after guitarist Mike Nesmith became ill.

The band posted on Facebook Thursday that Nesmith had "a minor health issue" before a show in Philadelphia and was advised to "rest for the next week." The 75-year-old has returned to his home in California.

Nesmith has been performing past hits in "The Monkees Present: The Mike & Micky Show" tour with 73-year-old bandmate Micky Dolenz.

The group says shows in Philadelphia, New York and New Jersey will be rescheduled.

The Monkees were formed in 1965 for a television series and included Peter Tork and Davy Jones. Their hits include "Daydream Believer," ''Pleasant Valley Sunday" and "Last Train to Clarksville."

New leaders tapped for Berlin film festival from 2020

Carlo Chatrian, the director of the Locarno film festival, and German movie industry official Mariette Rissenbeek have been tapped to take charge of the Berlin International Film Festival starting in 2020.

A committee led by Germany's culture minister, Monika Gruetters, on Friday designated Chatrian as the festival's future artistic director and Rissenbeek as its managing director.

Dieter Kosslick, who has been in charge since 2001, will preside over his last edition of the "Berlinale" next year. The annual event is one of Europe's main film festivals, along with Cannes and Venice.

The Italian-born Chatrian has led Switzerland's Locarno festival since 2013. Rissenbeek is currently the managing director of German Films, an advisory center for marketing German-made movies internationally.

Paul McCartney drives down memory lane for 'Carpool Karaoke'

It had been a magical mystery tour as Paul McCartney led James Corden through his hometown of Liverpool during a "Carpool Karaoke " segment on CBS' "The Late Late Show."

Thursday's program wraps up a weeklong stay in London and the 76-year-old Beatles legend joined Corden for a drive.

In between songs, McCartney autographs the Penny Lane wall and visits his childhood home.

Corden chokes up as McCartney explains how a dream about his late mother led to the lyrics for "Let It Be."

The pair ends up at a pub, where Corden serves as bartender and encourages patrons to use the jukebox. When one does, a curtain dropped and revealed McCartney on stage with a band. He sings some of his old hits before inviting Corden onstage for "Hey Jude."

Ichiro dons fake mustache, hoodie to sit in Mariners' dugout

A mysterious man was sitting in the Seattle Mariners’ dugout Thursday night, sporting a bushy mustache and wearing a hoodie. 

>> Read more trending news

And shades -- shades reminiscent of Bobby Valentine’s failed disguise in 1999 when he was ejected from a game and tried to sneak back into the dugout.

The mystery man was no stranger to Mariners fans -- Ichiro Suzuki, now an executive in the Seattle front office.

Suzuki sneaked into the Seattle dugout Thursday to watch the first inning of the Mariners’ game at Yankee Stadium against the New York Yankees, The New York Post reported.

"He was perfect. I never would have known it was him,'' Valentine texted to the The Associated Press.

Officially, Suzuki, 44, is not allowed to be in the dugout during games, ESPN reported. He was removed from the Mariners’ roster in May and moved into the front office as a special assistant to the team chairman, the AP reported.

AP photographer Bill Kostroun spotted Suzuki hiding in the dugout during the first inning. He had exited the dugout by the second inning as the Mariners lost 4-3 to the Yankees.Perhaps Suzuki had dropped a hint when he moved into his new position.

"During the game I will be doing the same preparations I've been doing the entire time. Nothing is going to change for me that I did as a player," Suzuki said. "But I can't say for certain that maybe I won't put on a beard and glasses and be like Bobby Valentine and be in the dugout."

Valentine, who was managing the New York Mets in 1999, was ejected from a game in the 12th inning. He later put on a fake mustache and sunglasses and attempted to sit in the dugout.

Valentine was caught and was suspended for two games. He also was fined $5,000.

Charles Krauthammer, conservative columnist and pundit, dies

Charles Krauthammer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and pundit who helped shape and occasionally dissented from the conservative movement as he evolved from "Great Society" Democrat to Iraq War cheerleader to denouncer of Donald Trump, has died at age 68.

His death was announced Thursday by two longtime employers, Fox News Channel and The Washington Post. Krauthammer had said publicly a year ago he was being treated for a cancerous tumor in his abdomen and earlier this month revealed that he likely had just weeks to live.

"I leave this life with no regrets," Krauthammer wrote in The Washington Post, where his column had run since 1984. "It was a wonderful life — full and complete with the great loves and great endeavors that make it worth living. I am sad to leave, but I leave with the knowledge that I lived the life that I intended."

Sometimes scornful, sometimes reflective, he was awarded a Pulitzer in 1987 for "his witty and insightful" commentary and was an influential voice among Republicans, whether through his syndicated column or his appearances on Fox News Channel. He was most associated with Brit Hume's nightly newscast and stayed with it when Bret Baier took over in 2009.

Krauthammer is credited with coining the term "The Reagan Doctrine" for President Reagan's policy of aiding anti-Communist movements worldwide. He was a leading advocate for the Iraq War and a prominent critic of President Barack Obama, whom he praised for his "first-class intellect and first-class temperament" and denounced for having a "highly suspect" character.

Krauthammer was a former Harvard medical student who graduated even after he was paralyzed from the neck down because of a diving board accident, continuing his studies from his hospital bed. He was a Democrat in his youth and his political engagement dated back to 1976, when he handed out leaflets for Henry Jackson's unsuccessful presidential campaign.

But through the 1980s and beyond, Krauthammer followed a journey akin to such neo-conservative predecessors as Irving Kristol and Norman Podhoretz, turning against his old party on foreign and domestic issues. He aligned with Republicans on everything from confrontation with the Soviet Union to rejection of the "Great Society" programs enacted during the 1960s.

"As I became convinced of the practical and theoretical defects of the social-democratic tendencies of my youth, it was but a short distance to a philosophy of restrained, free-market governance that gave more space and place to the individual and to the civil society that stands between citizen and state," he wrote in the introduction to "Things That Matter," a million-selling compilation of his writings published in 2013. As of midday Friday, the hardcover edition of "Things That Matter" Was No. 1 on Amazon.com. The paperback was No. 2.

For the Post, Time magazine, The New Republic and other publications, Krauthammer wrote on a wide range of subjects, and in "Things That Matter" listed chess, baseball, "the innocence of dogs" and "the cunning of cats" among his passions. As a psychiatrist in the 1970s, he did groundbreaking research on bipolar disorder.

He was attacked for his politics, and for his predictions. He was so confident of quick success in Iraq he initially labeled the 2003 invasion "The Three Week War" and defended the conflict for years. He also backed the George W. Bush administration's use of torture as an "uncontrolled experiment" carried out "sometimes clumsily, sometimes cruelly, indeed, sometimes wrongly. But successfully. It kept us safe."

And the former president praised Krauthammer after hearing of his death.

"For decades, Charles' words have strengthened our democracy," George W. Bush said in a statement. "His work was far-reaching and influential — and while his voice will be deeply missed, his ideas and values will always be a part of our country."

Krauthammer was sure that Obama would lose in 2008 because of lingering fears from the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, and foresaw Mitt Romney defeating him in 2012.

But he prided himself on his rejection of orthodoxy and took on Republicans, too, observing during a Fox special in 2013 that "If you're going to leave the medical profession because you think you have something to say, you betray your whole life if you don't say what you think and if you don't say it honestly and bluntly."

He criticized the death penalty and rejected intelligent design as "today's tarted-up version of creationism." In 2005, he was widely cited as a key factor in convincing Bush to rescind the Supreme Court nomination of the president's friend and legal adviser Harriet Miers, whom Krauthammer and others said lacked the necessary credentials. And he differed with such Fox commentators as Bill O'Reilly and Laura Ingraham as he found himself among the increasingly isolated "Never Trumpers," Republicans regarding the real estate baron and former "Apprentice" star as a vulgarian unfit for the presidency.

"I used to think Trump was an 11-year-old, an undeveloped schoolyard bully," he wrote in August 2016, around the time Trump officially became the Republican nominee. "I was off by about 10 years. His needs are more primitive, an infantile hunger for approval and praise, a craving that can never be satisfied. He lives in a cocoon of solipsism where the world outside himself has value — indeed exists — only insofar as it sustains and inflates him."

Trump, of course, tweeted about Krauthammer, who "pretends to be a smart guy, but if you look at his record, he isn't. A dummy who is on too many Fox shows. An overrated clown!"

Krauthammer married Robyn Trethewey, an artist and former attorney, in 1974. They had a son, Daniel, who also became a columnist and commentator.

The son of Jewish immigrants from Europe, Krauthammer was born in New York City and moved with his family to Montreal when he was 5, growing up in a French speaking home. His path to political writing was unexpected. First, at McGill University, he became editor in chief of the student newspaper after his predecessor was ousted over what Krauthammer called his "mindless, humorless Maoism."

After Krauthammer announced that he was dying of cancer, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu wrote him a letter, telling him that he had gleaned wisdom from his insights. "You never bored. You were never mundane," Netanyahu wrote in his June 10 letter.

"More than anything else, you have lived a life of purpose. As a proud American and a proud son of the Jewish people, you harnessed your formidable intellect to defend liberty and the Jewish state."

In the late 1970s, while a psychiatric resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, a professor with whom he had researched manic depression was appointed to a mental health agency created by President Jimmy Carter. Krauthammer went, too, began writing for The New Republic and was soon recruited to write speeches for Carter's vice president and 1980 running mate, Walter Mondale.

Carter was defeated by Reagan and on Jan. 20, 1981, Reagan's inauguration day, Krauthammer formally joined The New Republic as a writer and editor.

"These quite fantastic twists and turns have given me a profound respect for serendipity," he wrote in 2013. "A long forgotten, utterly trivial student council fight brought me to journalism. A moment of adolescent anger led me to the impulsive decision to quit political studies and enroll in medical school. A decade later, a random presidential appointment having nothing to do with me brought me to a place where my writing and public career could begin.

"When a young journalist asks me today, 'How do I get to a nationally syndicated columnist?' I have my answer: 'First, go to medical school.'"

____

AP Television Writer David Bauder contributed to this report.

Michelle Obama says her memoir is a 're-humanization' effort

Former first lady Michelle Obama said Friday her upcoming memoir "Becoming" is a "re-humanization effort" that shares the "ordinariness of a very extraordinary story" that she hopes will give voice to people who feel voiceless.

Obama made the remarks as she helped kick off the American Library Association's annual conference in New Orleans. Librarian of Congress Dr. Carla Hayden moderated the conversation before an estimated crowd of 8,000 inside the city's convention center.

Obama shared snippets from the book, including the experiences that have shaped her, from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive and her time at the White House.

She told the crowd that much of who she is today results from the influence of her parents, Fraser and Marian Robinson.

"My parents had a strong sense of how to parent and taught us at an early age to figure it out," Obama said. "They let us know, that as children, our opinions mattered. But they encouraged us to contribute to the solution. You could air it out, but you had to be the one to solve whatever it was."

She said her parents taught her and her brother about the work ethic and the value of doing what you say you're going to do.

"When I go throughout my day, I often ask myself, 'Am I doing what I think Marian and Fraser would expect me to do?'" she said.

Obama said her mother's "no nonsense" energy has always been a part of her life and was welcome at the White House.

"We had butlers and housekeepers at the White House, but my mother would tell them, 'Don't touch my underwear. I got it,'" she said, drawing a round of laughter. "She's the one who taught my girls how to do laundry. She keeps us humble and focused on what's important. She's also my sounding board. She'll sit and just listen and then ask me, 'What do you think you should do about that?'"

Obama said the book gave her a chance to reflect on the whirlwind of her life as a working executive and mother with a high-profile husband in a high-profile job.

"I didn't come into (being first lady) with a blank slate," she said. "I had big jobs. I went to Princeton. I went to Harvard. I am a lawyer. But as Barack's ascent got faster and higher, I had to figure out and balance marriage and balance becoming a spouse. I've learned that you can have it all, but not all at the same time."

Obama also talked about the value of strong friendships, noting she could not have gotten through her time in the White House without a "posse who kept me sane." She told the young, single mothers in the audience, "you weren't meant to parent in isolation."

"It truly takes a village to raise children. Build your village wherever you are. It will be your salvation and keep you sane," she said, drawing a roar of applause.

The book is being released in November in the U.S. through the Crown Publishing Group, a Penguin Random House division.

The conference, which ends Tuesday, is expected to draw more than 15,000 participants.

China blocks John Oliver on social media after scathing show

A popular Chinese social media site is censoring discussion of "Last Week Tonight" and its HBO host John Oliver after he mocked Chinese President Xi Jinping, his apparent sensitivity about being compared to Winnie the Pooh and his country's crackdown on human rights.

Attempts to send posts with either the terms "John Oliver" or "Last Week Tonight" on the Sina Weibo microblog Friday were met with failure messages saying "the content contains information that violates relevant laws and regulations."

Oliver's show on Sunday made satirical references to Xi and the way that Chinese internet users often joke that he resembles Winnie the Pooh. The show also referred to China's internment of hundreds of thousands of members of the Muslim Uighur minority groups in political indoctrination camps .

Oliver called Xi "the man who is now emperor for life," referring to the Chinese leader's power grab earlier this year when presidential term limits were eliminated.

On YouTube, the video of the 20-minute segment was viewed more than 3.3 million times by Friday.

The show also turned a critical eye to Xi's signature anti-corruption crackdown that has ensnared political rivals and his hallmark program of overseas infrastructure projects known as the "Belt and Road" initiative.

Oliver's show included a parody of a propaganda music video made to promote the initiative in which children sing about China being an autocracy that abuses its citizens' human rights. "This is the China Xi doesn't want you to see," they sing in chorus.

It also discussed moves to build up a cult of personality around Xi, the ruling Communist Party's attacks on human rights campaigners and the death of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo last year while serving a prison term for subversion.

The censoring of social media posts was the latest sign of the country's increasing sensitivity over political content and satire. China maintains some of the world's toughest restrictions on content online as well as on foreign news and entertainment broadcasters such as HBO.

Weibo did not immediately respond Friday to a request for comment.

ABC orders 'Roseanne' spinoff for fall minus Roseanne Barr

ABC, which canceled its "Roseanne" revival over its star's racist tweet, said Thursday it will air a Conner family sitcom minus Roseanne Barr this fall.

ABC ordered 10 episodes of the spinoff after Barr relinquished any creative or financial participation in it, which the network had said was a condition of such a series.

In a statement issued by the show's producer, Barr said she agreed to the settlement to save the jobs of 200 cast and crew members who were idled when "Roseanne" was canceled last month.

"I regret the circumstances that have caused me to be removed from 'Roseanne,' she said, adding, "I wish the best for everyone involved."

The revival of the hit 1988-97 sitcom "Roseanne" was swiftly axed by ABC last month after Barr posted a tweet likening former Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett to a product of the Muslim Brotherhood and "Planet of the Apes."

Tom Werner, executive producer of the original series and the revival, said in the statement that he was grateful to reach the deal to keep the team working "as we continue to explore stories of the Conner family."

ABC said that the new series, with "The Conners" as its working title, will star John Goodman, Laurie Metcalf, Sara Gilbert, Lecy Goranson and Michael Fishman.

How Barr's character, the family matriarch, will be erased from their lives was left unexplained for now by ABC.

"After a sudden turn of events, the Conners are forced to face the daily struggles of life in Lanford in a way they never have before," the network said in its announcement, referring to the fictional Illinois town where the family lives.

The spinoff will continue to portray contemporary issues that are as relevant today as they were 30 years ago," ABC said, a nod to the unusual portrayal of a blue-collar family on TV.

In a joint statement, the cast expressed support for the project.

"We have received a tremendous amount of support from fans of our show, and it's clear that these characters not only have a place in our hearts, but in the hearts and homes of our audience," they said.

After getting the chance last season to tell stories about challenges facing working-class family, they're glad to "continue to share those stories through love and laughter," the actors said.

The new show was ordered from producer Werner Entertainment without a pilot episode, the typical basis for a series to be greenlit.

Barr's tweet had been condemned by ABC Entertainment President Channing Dungey as "abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with our values."

Barr initially apologized and deleted the post, which had followed her pattern of making controversial political and social statements on social media. Some observers questioned why ABC had ordered the revival given her history.

But the comedy's return was an instant smash for ABC, owned by the Walt Disney Co., and was counted on to lead the network's fortunes next season.

Its first new episode last March was seen by more than 25 million people, with delayed viewing counted in, numbers that are increasingly rare in network television.

Kantar Media said "Roseanne" earned an estimated $45 million in advertising revenue for ABC through last season's nine-episode run.

The show tackled hot-button topics such as the opioid epidemic, single parenting and the Trump presidency, with the fictional Roseanne's support mirrored by that of Barr in real life.

The reboot also prompted some outrage, including over a joke about two other TV comedies featuring minority characters that was deemed dismissive and an episode some people called Islamophobic.

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Lynn Elber can be reached at lelber@ap.org and on Twitter at http://twitter.com/lynnelber .

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