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Amazon working on home robot, report says

Amazon.com Inc. may be gearing up for its next big project: a home robot.

>> On AJC.com: Amazon in 2018: 6 things you should know about the e-commerce giant

The rumor comes from a Bloomberg report published Monday in which sources familiar with the plan revealed that the company has started work on the domestic robot under the code name Vesta.

>> Read more trending news 

According to the sources, Vesta has apparently been in the works for years, but new job listings for Lab126, Amazon’s hardware research and development division, have sprung up this year.

Lab126 engineers previously built Amazon’s Kindle, Fire Phone and Echo.

“People briefed on the plan say the company hopes to begin seeding the robots in employees’ homes by the end of this year, and potentially with consumers as early as 2019,” Bloomberg reported, noting that the timeline may change.

>> On AJC.com: 6 most impressive benefits offered to Amazon employees

The Vesta robot prototypes reportedly have computer vision software and advanced cameras for navigation. Think of a “mobile Alexa, accompanying customers in parts of their home where they don’t have Echo devices,” Bloomberg analysts wrote.

An Amazon spokesperson told Bloomberg the company doesn’t comment on “rumors and speculation.” The AJC has reached out to Amazon for comment, as well. 

>> On AJC.com: Amazon tours Atlanta in its second headquarters search

Other companies have dabbled in domestic robots before, including iRobot and its Roomba vacuum and MobileRobots Inc.’s Jeeves home security robot.

Read the full report from Bloomberg.com.

This Facebook tool reveals whether Cambridge Analytica has your data

If you're still in the dark as to whether your Facebook information was shared with data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica, the social networking site now has a tool that will clear things up.

>> PREVIOUS STORY: Facebook to alert users if their data was compromised by Cambridge Analytica

According to Mashable, a Facebook page titled "How can I tell if my info was shared with Cambridge Analytica?" reveals whether you or your friends used a quiz app called "This Is Your Digital Life," which reportedly exposed the data.

>> Click here to use the Facebook tool

Once you're on the page, scroll down to "Was My Information Shared?" There, you'll see one of the following messages:

>> Cambridge Analytica: What you need to know about the firm, Facebook and your information

1. Based on our available records, neither you nor your friends logged into "This Is Your Digital Life."

As a result, it doesn't appear your Facebook information was shared with Cambridge Analytica by "This Is Your Digital Life."

>> Cambridge Analytica data breach affected up to 87M Facebook users, company says

2. Based on our investigation, you don't appear to have logged into "This Is Your Digital Life" with Facebook before we removed it from our platform in 2015. 

However, a friend of yours did log in. 

As a result, the following information was likely shared with "This Is Your Digital Life": 

  • Your public profile, Page likes, birthday and current city. 

A small number of people who logged into "This Is Your Digital Life" also shared their own News Feed, timeline, posts and messages which may have included posts and messages from you. They may also have shared your hometown.

>> Mark Zuckerberg testimony live updates: Facebook CEO testifies before Congress

3. Our investigation indicates you logged into "This Is Your Digital Life" with Facebook before we moved it from our platform in 2015.

As a result, you likely shared the following information with "This Is Your Digital Life":

  • Your public profile, Page likes, friend list, birthday and current city
  • Your friends' public profiles, Page likes, birthday and current cities

A small number of people also shared their News Feed, timeline, posts, messages and friends' hometowns with "This Is Your Digital Life."

>> You don’t have to #DeleteFacebook: 7 tips to lock down your privacy without leaving

According to The Associated Press, as many as 87 million users' data may have been shared with the firm, which "may have used ill-gotten user data to try to influence elections."

>> Read more trending news 

Facebook previously announced it would send affected users notices, but the AP reported late Tuesday that "there were no signs that any users have yet received that notification." 

>> Facebook breach: Want to leave the social media giant? Here’s how

Additionally, Facebook said it would be sending its 2.2 billion users a more general notice about protecting their privacy on the social networking site.

Read more here.

YouTube accused of illegally collecting children's data

A new complaint filed with the Federal Trade Commission accuses video-sharing site YouTube of illegally collecting children's data.

>> Here's how to download a copy of the data Facebook keeps on you

According to the Guardian, nearly two dozen advocacy groups, including the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood and the Center for Digital Democracy, are arguing that YouTube's parent company, Google, violates the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act by collecting data on and targeting advertising toward children without obtaining parental consent beforehand.

>> Facebook alerts users if their data was compromised by Cambridge Analytica

The complaint, filed Monday, also alleges that Google knows that children use YouTube, even though YouTube asks that children under 13 not use the site.

"Despite the presence of literally millions of child-directed videos, and despite promising advertisers access to kids via YouTube ads, Google pretends that they aren’t responsible for the children on YouTube," the CCFC said on its website. "Google knows kids are there, and they are not taking steps to protect their privacy. So we are."

>> Cambridge Analytica: What you need to know about the firm, Facebook and your information

YouTube released the following statement in response to the complaint:

"We are reviewing the complaint and will evaluate if there are things we can do to improve. Protecting kids and families has always been a top priority for us. Because YouTube is not for children, we’ve invested significantly in the creation of the YouTube Kids app to offer an alternative specifically designed for children."

>> Read more trending news 

According to The Associated Press, YouTube Kids "offers more parental controls but is not as widely used" as the main YouTube site.

Read the full complaint here.

Delta, Sears, Kmart data breach: Customer payment info possibly compromised in cyberattack

Update Apr 5, 2018 3:45 PM EDT: In addition to Delta Airlines, Sears Holdings announced that customer data from Sears and Kmart stores, including names, addresses and credit card numbers, may have been exposed during a security breach last fall.

>> Read more trending news 

Sears Holdings uses the same online chat service as Delta, [24]7.ai, and said in a statement posted on its website that it believes fewer than 100,000 customers were affected by the breach.

“As soon as [24]7.ai informed us in mid-March 2018, we immediately notified the credit card companies to prevent potential fraud, and launched a thorough investigation with federal law enforcement authorities, our banking partners, and IT security firms,” company officials said.

Sears Holdings said the credit card information of customers making purchases online between Sept. 27, 2017 and Oct. 12, 2017, may have been compromised, but that anyone using a Sears credit card was not affected.

The company said there’s no evidence its stores were compromised or that Sears’ internal data bases were compromised.

Sears Holdings is establishing a hotline for customers to find out more about the breach by Friday.

(Previous story)

Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines is the latest victim of a cyber incident.

>> Watch the news report here

Delta announced Wednesday that a "small subset" of customers may have had their payment information compromised online.

"(I’m) a little uneasy. I think they'll take care of it, so it will be OK, but the first gut reaction is a little nerve-racking," traveler Nicole Ladin told WSB-TV's Carl Willis at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, Delta's main hub. 

>> Visit WSBTV.com for the latest on this developing story

According to Delta, [24]7.ai, an online chat service they use, was hacked from Sept. 26 to Oct. 12 of last year, and payment information may have been compromised.

Delta said the airline was notified about the breach last Wednesday.

"It's just ... I think they have to make it 100 percent, to make it work 100 percent," traveler Marquise Bishop said.

Delta said the company will launch a special webpage at Delta.com/response at noon Thursday to address customer questions and concerns.

>> Read more trending news 

The airline also will start directly contacting customers who may have been impacted and ensure that customers are not responsible for any fraudulent payment card activity that may have happened.

Ladin told Willis that her mind will still be on her wallet as she flies home.

"Especially when you're a frequent flier. It gets a little nervous that that information has been leaked," Ladin said.

Here's is Delta's full statement about the cyber incident: 

"Last week, on March 28, Delta was notified by [24]7.ai, a company that provides online chat services for Delta and many other companies, that [24]7.ai had been involved in a cyber incident. It is our understanding that the incident occurred at [24]7.ai from Sept. 26 to Oct. 12, 2017, and that during this time certain customer payment information for [24]7.ai clients, including Delta, may have been accessed – but no other customer personal information, such as passport, government ID, security or SkyMiles information was impacted.

"Upon being notified of [24]7.ai's incident, Delta immediately began working with [24]7.ai to understand any potential impact the incident had on Delta customers, delta.com, or any Delta computer system. We also engaged federal law enforcement and forensic teams, and have confirmed that the incident was resolved by [24]7.ai last October. At this point, even though only a small subset of our customers would have been exposed, we cannot say definitively whether any of our customers' information was actually accessed or subsequently compromised.

"We appreciate and understand that this information is concerning to our customers. The security and confidentiality of our customers' information is of critical importance to us and a responsibility we take extremely seriously. Delta will launch delta.com/response, a dedicated website, noon ET April 5, which we will update regularly to address customer questions and concerns. We will also directly contact customers who may have been impacted by the [24]7.ai cyber incident. In the event any of our customers' payment cards were used fraudulently as a result of the [24]7.ai cyber incident, we will ensure our customers are not responsible for that activity."

>> Click here for more information from [24]7.ai

Facebook privacy practices under investigation, FTC confirms

The Federal Trade Commission confirmed Monday that it is investigating Facebook’s privacy practices amid reports that the social media giant inappropriately shared user data with consultancy firm Cambridge Analytica.

>> Read more trending news

“The FTC takes very seriously recent press reports raising substantial concerns about the privacy practices of Facebook,” Tom Pahl, acting director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, said Monday in a statement. “Today, the FTC is confirming that it has an open non-public investigation into these practices.”

>> Related: Here's how to download a copy of the data Facebook keeps on you

Facebook has faced criticism since reports surfaced that Cambridge Analytica got access to the data of about 50 million Facebook users inappropriately.

Citing unidentified sources, Bloomberg News reported last week that the FTC was investigating whether Facebook violated the terms of a consent decree it reached with the FTC in 2011 over privacy concerns.

>> Related: BBB warns about popular Facebook quiz

The decree required the company to “notify users and receive explicit permission before sharing personal data beyond their specified privacy settings,” CNBC reported. Officials declined to confirm the report.

If found in violation of the decree, Facebook could face a fine of $40,000 per violation, CNBC reported.

>> Related: You don’t have to #DeleteFacebook: 7 tips to lock down your privacy without leaving

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a statement last week that Cambridge Analytica got data gathered from a personality quiz app created in 2013 by Cambridge University researcher Aleksandr Kogan. The app, which was installed by about 300,000 people, asked users to share their data as well as the data of their friends, Zuckerberg said.

>> Related: Facebook breach: Want to leave the social media giant? Here’s how

“Given the way our platform worked at the time, this meant Kogan was able to access tens of millions of their friends’ data,” Zuckerberg said.

He added that Facebook implemented measures in 2014 to prevent similar situations and better protect user privacy.

Astronaut Scott Kelly’s DNA doesn’t match twin Mark’s after year-long space mission

A trip to space would be a life-changing experience. But scientists didn’t realize how much it changes astronauts when it comes to the building blocks of life.

NASA sent astronaut, and twin, Scott Kelly, to the International Space Station for a one-year mission to study the effects of space on the human body, KTLA reported

>> Read more trending news 

Scott Kelly was in space from March 2015 to March 2016, Newsweek reported.

His identical twin brother Mark kept his feet firmly planted on Earth. 

The two men were identical, down to their cellular level, before the trip, but that can’t be said now. 

Scott now differs from Mark when it comes to their DNA.

Getting into the science specifics. 

Scientists looked at the spaceman’s metabolites, cytokines and proteins before and after his voyage. They said the mission caused Scott’s “space genes” to switch on, and they didn’t turn off after he returned to Earth. The experts believe they were turned on because of the stress of space travel, KTLA reported.

NASA said in the study that Scott’s cells showed changes in the length of telomeres, the ends of chromosomes that show biological aging. They were lengthened while he was in space, but they returned to almost normal days after he landed. There was also damage to his DNA that was caused by radiation and the restriction on his calories. His collagen, blood clotting and bone formation also changed and because of zero gravity and fluid shifts.

Kelly’s year-long trip in space was a precursor to planned three-year missions to Mars. Scientists needed to test how space missions that are longer than what is currently done impacts astronauts, KTLA reported.

Click here to read NASA’s study.

Related video:

Newest cellphone is only that -- a phone

Your kids are begging for the latest and greatest cellphones to hit the market.

They may not like a new one that’s being introduced, but you sure will like them to have it.

It is called  Light Phone 2 and it has only a few functions. First and foremost is a phone, ABC News reported.

It can call and it can text. But it cannot use Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram or any other social media.

>> Read more trending news 

Light Phone 2 can also message, use maps and call for an Uber, the Telegraph reported.

Basically, it’s an old-fashioned flip phone without the flip phone look.

It also uses E-Ink for the display and operates on a modified version of the Android operating system, the Telegraph reported.

“Unlike a flip phone, however, to children the Light Phone is seen as ‘cool’ amongst their peers,” Joe Hollier, co--founder of Light told “Good Morning America.” “We have been working with parents on the idea of a parental app to support their child’s Light Phone 2 as well.”

Light launched it’s first phone in 2016. It could only make calls and store nine numbers, the Telegraph reported. The company sold 10,000 devices, but they were too simple for many and were not practical for some, the Telegraph reported.

Light Phone 2 are expected to ship next year and will cost about $250, the Telegraph reported.

If you want to get in on the new technology, the company launched an IndieGoGo campaign to raise $250,000. So far it has exceeded that amount by 335 percent and has more than $836,000 pledged from supporters.

Google’s new AI can look into your eyes and predict heart attack risk

Researchers from Google and sibling company Verily Life Sciences have developed a new algorithm using artificial intelligence to predict the risk of heart attack, stroke and other major cardiovascular events.

How does it work? Through the eyes.

» RELATED: Google launches 10,000-person study to predict how and when people get sick

Scientists studied data from 284,335 patients and found the “deep-learning” AI algorithm could identify risk factors based on age, blood pressure, gender, smoking status and others just by scanning the individuals’ retinas.

“The rear interior wall of the eye (the fundus) is chock-full of blood vessels that reflect the body’s overall health,” the Verge reported. “By studying their appearance with camera and microscope, doctors can infer things like an individual’s blood pressure, age, and whether or not they smoke, which are all important predictors of cardiovascular health.”

» RELATED: Google's AI push comes with plenty of people problems

Google’s AI was able to differentiate patients who suffered a major cardiac event in the following five years and those who didn’t with a 70 percent accuracy

>> Read more trending news 

"While doctors can typically distinguish between the retinal images of patients with severe high blood pressure and normal patients, our algorithm could go further to predict the systolic blood pressure within 11 mmHg on average for patients overall, including those with and without high blood pressure," lead author Lily Peng wrote in a Google blog.

» RELATED: Bullied, abused children and teens at higher risk of heart disease, study says

Medical algorithms are traditionally created to redesign experiments to test hypotheses made from observations. But this algorithm found new ways to analyze existing medical data.

“With enough data, it’s hoped that artificial intelligence can then create entirely new medical insight without human direction,” the Verge reported.

» RELATED: Just one cigarette can up your chance for heart disease and stroke, study says

This technology would make it more efficient for doctors to analyze cardiac risk without a blood test, which typically predicts events with 72 percent accuracy. But more tests are necessary before the AI can be used in a clinical setting.

“We look forward to developing and testing our algorithm on larger and more comprehensive datasets. To make this useful for patients, we will be seeking to understand the effects of interventions such as lifestyle changes or medications on our risk predictions and we will be generating new hypotheses and theories to test,” Peng wrote.

The research was published Monday in the journal “Biomedical Engineering.”

WATCH: Boston Dynamics' 'robot dog' taught to open doors

Robots are already changing the world around us – and in some people’s minds, getting ready to take over the world – but at least one of them has good manners.

>> Watch the video here

Boston Dynamics, the company behind Atlas (an upright bipedal robot that looks like it’s wearing a space suit), Spot (a 4-legged robot that sprints like a cheetah) and Handle (a wheeled robot that can spin, squat and jump), has introduced their newest creation – SpotMini, a robot the company has taught to open doors.

>> Read more trending news 

The newest video is only 45 seconds long, but it shows one discouraged SpotMini that gets stuck at a door. Thankfully, another SpotMini arrives – and this one is built with an arm that can grab the handle and pull the door open, allowing the first robot through before following behind.

Boston Dynamics designs robots with real-world applications that range from searching damaged buildings to chasing criminals.

Lyft responds to claims of employees snooping on riders

Former Lyft employees say the company spied on riders, and now the ride-sharing service is investigating the claim. 

According to a report from The Information, a current or former employee made an anonymous post online claiming  to have seen employees look up rider data on friends, exes, porn stars, actors and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

>> Read more trending news 

Tech Crunch reported that it spoke with a source who once worked with Lyft. The unnamed source said staff can see feedback, rider history and pickup and dropoff coordinates.

“Maintaining the trust of passengers and drivers is fundamental to Lyft,” the company said in a statement. “The specific allegations in this post would be a violation of Lyft’s policies and a cause for termination, and have not been raised with our Legal or Executive teams. We are conducting an investigation into the matter. 

“Access to data is restricted to certain teams that need it to do their jobs. For those teams, each query is logged and attributed to a specific individual. We require employees to be trained in our data privacy practices and responsible use policy, which categorically prohibit accessing and using customer data for reasons other than those required by their specific role at the company. Employees are required to sign confidentiality and responsible use agreements that bar them from accessing, using, or disclosing customer data outside the confines of their job responsibilities.”

A timeline for Lyft’s investigation was not provided, according to CNN.

Related video: Tips for Safely Using Ride-Hailing Services

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