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Growing Fintech industry employs tens of thousands in Georgia

More than 70 percent of all credit card transactions are now being processed out of metro Atlanta and that means security is a top priority.

Channel 2 Anchor Craig Lucie went to Mercedes-Benz stadium for the FinTech South event this week, where he learned local companies are employing thousands here in Georgia and around the world.

“We dominate this industry globally,” said Larry Williams.

Larry Williams is the president and CEO of the Technology Association of Georgia or TAG. He organized the FinTech South event at Mercedes-Benz Stadium because he says financial technology has become one of the most important industries in Georgia.

“Seventy percent of all credit card transaction are processed here in Georgia,” Williams said.

Cyber companies from all over the world are in town, but many of them are based in the metro  like Trust Stamp. They’re a startup from the Atlanta Tech Village, and they’re using artificial intelligence to send secure emails to avoid massive security breaches.

“Instead of hitting the send button, you will hit a send secure button and our technology will prompt you to do a facial scan and once we verify the email, it will be encrypted and sent to the recipient,” said Alex Valdes of Trust Stamp.

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These numbers give you an idea as to why they are having the event at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. Georgia Fintech companies are employing more than 37,000 people in our state, 130,000 globally, and they are handling more than 128 billion transactions per year.

One of them is Midtown Atlanta-based Payscape.

“We employ several hundred people. We process billions worth of transactions, and we have seen an ecosystem revolve from what used to be a cottage industry around us,” said Jeremy Wing who is the CEO of Payscape.

Wing says the ideas coming out of FinTech South event are changing the way we pay.

“Credits cards will be the things that go away, and it will all be built into your phone and be Uber-like,” said Wing.

Growing Fintech industry employs tens of thousands in Georgia

More than 70 percent of all credit card transactions are now being processed out of metro Atlanta and that means security is a top priority.

Channel 2 Anchor Craig Lucie went to Mercedes-Benz stadium for the FinTech South event this week, where he learned local companies are employing thousands here in Georgia and around the world.

“We dominate this industry globally,” said Larry Williams.

Larry Williams is the president and CEO of the Technology Association of Georgia or TAG. He organized the FinTech South event at Mercedes-Benz Stadium because he says financial technology has become one of the most important industries in Georgia.

“Seventy percent of all credit card transaction are processed here in Georgia,” Williams said.

Cyber companies from all over the world are in town, but many of them are based in the metro  like Trust Stamp. They’re a startup from the Atlanta Tech Village, and they’re using artificial intelligence to send secure emails to avoid massive security breaches.

“Instead of hitting the send button, you will hit a send secure button and our technology will prompt you to do a facial scan and once we verify the email, it will be encrypted and sent to the recipient,” said Alex Valdes of Trust Stamp.

TRENDING STORIES:

Medical examiner releases CDC researcher's cause of death Doctor who made music videos in operating room facing several malpractice lawsuits Kayaker bitten by rattlesnake, cousin clarifies story; victim's condition upgraded

These numbers give you an idea as to why they are having the event at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. Georgia Fintech companies are employing more than 37,000 people in our state, 130,000 globally, and they are handling more than 128 billion transactions per year.

One of them is Midtown Atlanta-based Payscape.

“We employ several hundred people. We process billions worth of transactions, and we have seen an ecosystem revolve from what used to be a cottage industry around us,” said Jeremy Wing who is the CEO of Payscape.

Wing says the ideas coming out of FinTech South event are changing the way we pay.

“Credits cards will be the things that go away, and it will all be built into your phone and be Uber-like,” said Wing.

Women claims security officer assaulted them at Houston's; TI calls for boycott of Houston's

A video showing a security officer holding down a woman at Houston’s restaurant is going viral, after local rapper T.I. posted it on his social media. 

It showed a security officer holding a woman down outside of Houston’s on Peachtree Road on May 13.

“From the video, I think any kind of physical anything is not good on anyone,” said Atlanta resident Alieon Music. 

Photos Brittany Lucio's attorney sent Channel 2 Action News show the injuries she says she received.

Police said it started because Lucio and her two friends refused to leave Houston’s women’s bathroom after the restaurant closed. despite being asked multiple times, first by management then by the security officer. 

When the security officer first approached the women, police say they laughed and looked at their phones. 

At the third request, police say the officer grabbed Lucio’s wrist and said “let’s go,” he says she kept resisting and punched him in the mouth. 

“They should have left, but still putting hands on, what makes him so comfortable to be able to put his hands on somebody?” Music said.

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The women were arrested. Lucio was charged with both criminal trespass and felony obstruction.

The other two charged with criminal trespass.

One of the other women arrested, Asia’h Epperson, told Channel 2 Action News in a statement the security officer is lying and she plans on taking legal action. The Atlanta Police Department says that officers’ actions are under review.

Epperson released a statement to Channel 2 Action News:

"Like I said, the statement that was released was false and exaggerated. It was not after hours. The restaurant was open. It was full of people. We asked if we could use the restroom and we were given permission to do so. We were in the restroom maybe 7-8minutes. Actually Using the restroom, and On the phone with the Uber driver trying to give directions to where we were! Period. We weren’t doing anything wrong. We were never asked multiple times to leave. That is a lie. We are moving forward very rapidly with this matter things will be handled legally!"

Meanwhile, Atlanta-rapper T.I. is calling for the Houston’s chain to be shut down. Last year he organized a boycott of the Houston’s that's now shut down on Lenox Road when a staffer he says threw out a group of black female customers. 

Houston's released a statement to Channel 2 Action News:

"We are aware of a complaint regarding an incident at our Houston’s Restaurant on Peachtree Road on May 13th and are cooperating with the Atlanta Police Department (APD). The evidence we have seen thus far shows that three women arrived approximately 30 minutes after closing time, they went into the restroom as a group after being told that the restaurant was closed, the three stayed in the restroom for more than 10 minutes, and refused to leave despite repeated requests from several managers to do so. Eventually, an off-duty Atlanta Police Officer again asked the women to leave. An altercation with the APD officer ensued which led to additional APD being summoned."

Women claims security officer assaulted them at Houston's; TI calls for boycott of Houston's

A video showing a security officer holding down a woman at Houston’s restaurant is going viral, after local rapper T.I. posted it on his social media. 

It showed a security officer holding a woman down outside of Houston’s on Peachtree Road on May 13.

“From the video, I think any kind of physical anything is not good on anyone,” said Atlanta resident Alieon Music. 

Photos Brittany Lucio's attorney sent Channel 2 Action News show the injuries she says she received.

Police said it started because Lucio and her two friends refused to leave Houston’s women’s bathroom after the restaurant closed. despite being asked multiple times, first by management then by the security officer. 

When the security officer first approached the women, police say they laughed and looked at their phones. 

At the third request, police say the officer grabbed Lucio’s wrist and said “let’s go,” he says she kept resisting and punched him in the mouth. 

“They should have left, but still putting hands on, what makes him so comfortable to be able to put his hands on somebody?” Music said.

TRENDING STORIES:

Medical examiner releases CDC researcher's cause of death Doctor who made music videos in operating room facing several malpractice lawsuits Kayaker bitten by rattlesnake, cousin clarifies story; victim's condition upgraded

The women were arrested. Lucio was charged with both criminal trespass and felony obstruction.

The other two charged with criminal trespass.

One of the other women arrested, Asia’h Epperson, told Channel 2 Action News in a statement the security officer is lying and she plans on taking legal action. The Atlanta Police Department says that officers’ actions are under review.

Epperson released a statement to Channel 2 Action News:

"Like I said, the statement that was released was false and exaggerated. It was not after hours. The restaurant was open. It was full of people. We asked if we could use the restroom and we were given permission to do so. We were in the restroom maybe 7-8minutes. Actually Using the restroom, and On the phone with the Uber driver trying to give directions to where we were! Period. We weren’t doing anything wrong. We were never asked multiple times to leave. That is a lie. We are moving forward very rapidly with this matter things will be handled legally!"

Meanwhile, Atlanta-rapper T.I. is calling for the Houston’s chain to be shut down. Last year he organized a boycott of the Houston’s that's now shut down on Lenox Road when a staffer he says threw out a group of black female customers. 

Houston's released a statement to Channel 2 Action News:

"We are aware of a complaint regarding an incident at our Houston’s Restaurant on Peachtree Road on May 13th and are cooperating with the Atlanta Police Department (APD). The evidence we have seen thus far shows that three women arrived approximately 30 minutes after closing time, they went into the restroom as a group after being told that the restaurant was closed, the three stayed in the restroom for more than 10 minutes, and refused to leave despite repeated requests from several managers to do so. Eventually, an off-duty Atlanta Police Officer again asked the women to leave. An altercation with the APD officer ensued which led to additional APD being summoned."

Judge to rule on trial of ex-officer accused of murder

A DeKalb County judge will review evidence and testimony before ruling on a request to dismiss charges against a former DeKalb County police officer.

Robert Olsen was indicted for murder, aggravated assault and other charges after he shot and killed a naked, unarmed man at a Chamblee apartment complex in March 2015.

The apartment manager called police after seeing Anthony Hill, a resident, wandering around the complex without clothing.

Olsen testified that when he arrived at the scene and got out of his patrol car, Hill sprinted toward him in an aggressive manner.

The former officer testified that he feared for his life, and felt he was under attack.

He shot Hill twice.

Though the officer attempted medical care on Hill, the Air Force veteran died on the scene.

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Defense attorneys have filed court papers asking a judge to dismiss charges against Olsen, claiming he shot Hill in an act of self-defense.

During an immunity hearing Tuesday, a defense witness and deadly use of force expert testified the officer did not have time to use a non-lethal weapon, such as a baton or taser.

He said he had only seconds to react to what he believed was a life-threatening situation.

"Under the circumstances and limited reaction time, using deadly force was appropriate,” said Darrell Lee Ross.

However, a prosecution witness disagreed.

Craig Webb, who trains DeKalb Police officers on deadly use of force, concluded Olsen had the preparation time to deploy pepper spray, a baton or taser.

"It's a very fluid situation,” Webb said.

DeKalb Superior Court Judge J.P. Boulee is expected to rule on whether charges are dismissed or the case goes to trial in the next two weeks.

Judge to rule on trial of ex-officer accused of murder

A DeKalb County judge will review evidence and testimony before ruling on a request to dismiss charges against a former DeKalb County police officer.

Robert Olsen was indicted for murder, aggravated assault and other charges after he shot and killed a naked, unarmed man at a Chamblee apartment complex in March 2015.

The apartment manager called police after seeing Anthony Hill, a resident, wandering around the complex without clothing.

Olsen testified that when he arrived at the scene and got out of his patrol car, Hill sprinted toward him in an aggressive manner.

The former officer testified that he feared for his life, and felt he was under attack.

He shot Hill twice.

Though the officer attempted medical care on Hill, the Air Force veteran died on the scene.

TRENDING STORIES:

Patient says she woke up from surgery in hotel room with sandwich in hand 'American Idol' reveals its 2 finalists are dating before announcing winner 2 victims of cougar attack identified, friends grieving death of avid cyclist

Defense attorneys have filed court papers asking a judge to dismiss charges against Olsen, claiming he shot Hill in an act of self-defense.

During an immunity hearing Tuesday, a defense witness and deadly use of force expert testified the officer did not have time to use a non-lethal weapon, such as a baton or taser.

He said he had only seconds to react to what he believed was a life-threatening situation.

"Under the circumstances and limited reaction time, using deadly force was appropriate,” said Darrell Lee Ross.

However, a prosecution witness disagreed.

Craig Webb, who trains DeKalb Police officers on deadly use of force, concluded Olsen had the preparation time to deploy pepper spray, a baton or taser.

"It's a very fluid situation,” Webb said.

DeKalb Superior Court Judge J.P. Boulee is expected to rule on whether charges are dismissed or the case goes to trial in the next two weeks.

Local company says its tool could prevent school shootings

A local company says it has a new gun tool which could prevent school shootings, teen suicides and accidental shootings.

Channel 2 Anchor Craig Lucie met with the Alpharetta-based company called Vypin. They make tracking devices for food transportation companies, but soon realized their device could be used in a totally different way. A way they say could save thousands of lives.

“I’m telling you, I think we can change the world,” said Brian Robbins. 

Brian Robbins told Lucie he’s never been so excited to work on a tiny device called the SafeTstrap. He says it could make schools and homes safer for our youth. 

“I think we can absolutely cut down on the thousands that die a year from school shootings, teen suicides and accidental shootings that come from the home,” said Robbins. 

Robbins works for Vypin, and he says the SafeTstrap works just like a gun lock, but its way more technical than that.

“A gun owner will know right away if it’s been moved, if it’s been cut or taken a hammer to,” said Robbins. 

Two things happen then if someone touches the firearm other than the owner.

“They will hear a siren in the house and mom and dad at work will know in a matter of seconds that someone has been messing with the gun,” said Robbins. 

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The push alerts and texts messages ping your cell phone. The SafeTstrap cost $50 and the Bluetooth box that triggers the alarm cost another $50. Vypin employees say they are talking to local law enforcement agencies, school districts and child safety organizations all over the country to get them in as many homes as possible since we hear about school shootings nearly every week. 

“It’s wildly frustrating,” said Robbins. 

In the latest shooting at Santa Fe High School in Texas, authorities say the alleged gunman used his father’s guns. 

“I’m the husband of a teacher, and I’m getting text messages about how horrifying things are and how scary it is. I’m sitting here in Alpharetta, and we have a solution,” said Robbins.

Local company says its tool could prevent school shootings

A local company says it has a new gun tool which could prevent school shootings, teen suicides and accidental shootings.

Channel 2 Anchor Craig Lucie met with the Alpharetta-based company called Vypin. They make tracking devices for food transportation companies, but soon realized their device could be used in a totally different way. A way they say could save thousands of lives.

“I’m telling you, I think we can change the world,” said Brian Robbins. 

Brian Robbins told Lucie he’s never been so excited to work on a tiny device called the SafeTstrap. He says it could make schools and homes safer for our youth. 

“I think we can absolutely cut down on the thousands that die a year from school shootings, teen suicides and accidental shootings that come from the home,” said Robbins. 

Robbins works for Vypin, and he says the SafeTstrap works just like a gun lock, but its way more technical than that.

“A gun owner will know right away if it’s been moved, if it’s been cut or taken a hammer to,” said Robbins. 

Two things happen then if someone touches the firearm other than the owner.

“They will hear a siren in the house and mom and dad at work will know in a matter of seconds that someone has been messing with the gun,” said Robbins. 

TRENDING STORIES:

Medical examiner releases CDC researcher's cause of death Doctor who made music videos in operating room facing several malpractice lawsuits Kayaker bitten by rattlesnake, cousin clarifies story; victim's condition upgraded

The push alerts and texts messages ping your cell phone. The SafeTstrap cost $50 and the Bluetooth box that triggers the alarm cost another $50. Vypin employees say they are talking to local law enforcement agencies, school districts and child safety organizations all over the country to get them in as many homes as possible since we hear about school shootings nearly every week. 

“It’s wildly frustrating,” said Robbins. 

In the latest shooting at Santa Fe High School in Texas, authorities say the alleged gunman used his father’s guns. 

“I’m the husband of a teacher, and I’m getting text messages about how horrifying things are and how scary it is. I’m sitting here in Alpharetta, and we have a solution,” said Robbins.

CDC warns pools, hot tubs, water parks are hotbed for disease outbreaks

You may want to think twice about jumping in that hotel pool or taking the kids to a popular water park nearby. 

According to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, contaminated recreational waters led to 493 reported disease outbreaks between 2000 and 2014.

These outbreaks, commonly caused by pathogens or chemicals, resulted in at least 27,219 cases and eight deaths. About half of the outbreaks started between June and August.

Public health officials examined data from 46 states and Puerto Rico for the report and found that hotel pools and hot tubs contributed to about one-third (32 percent) of the outbreaks. Public parks came in second (23 percent), then club/rec facilities (14 percent) and water parks (11 percent).

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While no significant trend was observed after 2007, the CDC said outbreaks caused by the parasite Cryptosporidium, also known as crypto, increased 25 percent per year between 2000 and 2006.

Of the 363 outbreaks with a microorganism as the culprit, 58 percent were classified as Crypto.

Crypto can spread when people swallow something that’s come into contact with an ill person’s feces, such as pool water contaminated with diarrhea, according to the CDC.

“Swallowing just a mouthful of water contaminated with Crypto can make otherwise healthy people sick for up to three weeks with watery diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, or vomiting, and can lead to dehydration,” the CDC states on its website.

The parasite is highly resistant to pool chemicals aimed at cleaning the waters, including chlorine and bromine.

The CDC recommends anyone, adults or children, who has experienced diarrhea should wait two weeks before getting in pools, hot tubs or other public water containers and parks. 

Additionally, avoid swallowing water when swimming, rinse off in the shower before entering the water and take children on bathroom breaks often.

Unlike Crypto, parasites Legionella and Pseudomonas can both be effectively controlled by halogens (chlorine, bromine) if the water is properly dosed. Unfortunately, 20 percent of public pools and hot tubs aren’t properly dosed with disinfectant.

Legionella can lead to a pneumonia-like condition known as Legionnaire’s disease or a flu-like condition called Pontiac fever. Legionella is transmitted when aerosolized water droplets often produced by hot tubs and spa jets are inhaled.

The number of outbreaks caused by Legionella increased 14 percent per year, according to the CDC report, but only accounted for 3 percent of the 363 identified microorganism outbreaks.

Pseudomonas, transmitted when skin comes in contact with contaminated water, may lead to rashes near the ear canal and otitis externa (or swimmer’s ear). Pseudomonas accounted for about 4 percent of the 363 outbreaks.  

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