Now Playing
B985 FM
Last Song Played
80s 90s & NOW
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
B985 FM
Last Song Played
80s 90s & NOW

Entertainment News

Results 1 - 20 of 100 next >

At Glastonbury, Depp asks about assassinating the president

Johnny Depp has asked a crowd at the Glastonbury Festival when was the last time an actor assassinated a president. The remarks came during a segment Thursday in which Depp was speaking about President Donald Trump.

He asked the question at the annual festival that celebrates the performing arts.

The 54-year-old "Pirates of the Caribbean" star followed by saying that he is not an actor, but someone who lies for a living.

However, he said, it's "been a while, and maybe it's time."

Actor John Wilkes Booth assassinated President Abraham Lincoln in 1865.

Depp was at the festival to introduce a screening of his 2004 film "The Libertine."

He played Trump last year in a Fun or Die video parody of the businessman's 1987 book "The Art of the Deal."

‘Cake Boss’ star Buddy Valastro's mother dies from ALS complications

The mother of “Cake Boss” star Buddy Valastro has died after a yearslong battle with Lou Gehrig's disease, which is also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. She was 69 years old. 

>> Read more trending news

Valestro’s representative confirmed the news in a statement to People.

“Mary took a turn yesterday, and Buddy rushed back to New Jersey last night to be by her side. She passed early this morning, June 22nd, surrounded by all of her children. Mary’s condition had been steadily worsening these past months, so it was not sudden but still extremely heartbreaking for the family. After eight years of fighting her battle with ALS, the family is relieved she is no longer suffering. Buddy and his sisters are absolutely crushed right now.”

Valastro also shared his grief with fans in a post on Instagram.

“It’s with an extremely heavy heart that I must share the news of my mother’s passing,” he wrote alongside the photo of his mother. “She left for heaven this morning, surrounded by the family. This is a difficult time for all of us and I do ask for your patience and respect while we let this sink in. Her battle with ALS has ended, she is no longer suffering and I hope she’s dancing to ‘I Will Survive’ with my dad right now.”

After her diagnosis, the Carlo’s Bakery owner started the Mama Mary Foundation to raise funds and awareness for ALS.

‘Baby Driver’ cast talks heart-pounding, toe-tapping summer action flick

Actor Kevin Spacey, Jon Hamm and Jamie Foxx star in the summer’s most anticipated action movie, and it’s equal parts heart-pounding thrills and toe-tapping musical.

Car crashes, romance and a musical backdrop make “Baby Driver” a genre-bending adrenaline kick from writer/director Edgar Wright.

>> Read more trending news

“We had a very good blueprint to work with from Edgar,” Jon Hamm told Hot Topics digital producer Jessica Sooknanan. “Not only his script and his shot-list essentially. He had the whole movie story boarded out.”

The film stars Ansel Elgort, who plays a skilled getaway driver in Atlanta serving kingpin Kevin Spacey and cronies Hamm and Jamie Foxx.

Wright wrote nearly every scene to the beat of a killer song.

“Everything really, even to the syncopation of what he hears when we do ADR, he really wanted it to bound the right way. It was magical in that way,” said Foxx.

It turns out, shooting guns on-beat is harder than it looks.

“It was really hard,” said Eiza Gonzales, who plays Hamm’s love interest, Darling. “When Jamie shot, then I knew someone else was going to shoot and then I was there, but you had to have the beat.”

>> Related: Ron Howard tapped to direct Han Solo stand-alone film

You’re not going to want to blink in the caffeinated heist thriller, or you might miss a musical cameo.

“There’s a brief appearance by Big Boi and Killer Mike, Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Sky Ferrerira, Paul Williams, Jon Spencer. To be honest, I would have done even more,” Wright said.

“Baby Driver” opens in the U.S. on June 28.

Bernie Mac, Snoop Dogg to get Hollywood Walk of Fame stars

Snoop Dogg, Shonda Rhimes, "Weird Al" Yankovic and late entertainers Bernie Mac and Steve Irwin will be receiving stars on Hollywood's Walk of Fame next year.

The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce revealed the 2018 honorees Thursday.

Other recipients include Lin-Manuel Miranda, Taraji P. Henson, RuPaul, Simon Cowell, Jennifer Lawrence, Zoe Saldana and Lynda Carter.

Jack Black, Anthony Anderson, Carrie Underwood and Mary J. Blige are also part of the Walk of Fame's class of 2018.

So are business magnate Richard Branson and Steve Jones, the former The Sex Pistols member turned radio host.

Anyone can nominate a celebrity for Walk of Fame star consideration.

Selections are made by a Chamber of Commerce committee.

Walk of Fame honorees or their sponsoring studios must pay $40,000 for each star granted.

Spokesman: Cosby plans tour to educate youth on misbehavior

Bill Cosby will organize a series of town hall meetings to help educate young people about problems their misbehavior could create and other issues, a spokesman for Cosby said.

Cosby is eager to get back to work following a deadlocked jury and mistrial in his sexual assault case, spokesman Andrew Wyatt told Birmingham, Alabama, TV station WBRC on Wednesday.

"We'll talk to young people. Because this is bigger than Bill Cosby. You know, this, this issue can affect any young person, especially young athletes of today," Wyatt said. "And they need to know what they're facing when they're hanging out and partying, when they're doing certain things they shouldn't be doing.

"And it also affects married men," Wyatt said, without elaborating.

"Is it kind of a, 'Do as I say, not as I do' situation?" the newscaster asked, but it was unclear if Wyatt heard and responded to the question.

Prosecutors have said Cosby will be retried on sexual assault charges stemming from former Temple University worker Andrea Constand's allegations that Cosby drugged and molested her in 2004. Cosby contends the encounter was consensual.

The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network, an anti-sexual violence organization known as RAINN, responded to Cosby's announced plans.

"It would be more useful if Mr. Cosby would spend time talking with people about how not to commit sexual assault in the first place," RAINN spokeswoman Jodi Omear said in a statement.

In a statement Thursday to The Associated Press, Wyatt expanded on his remarks.

He said that many civic organizations and churches have called asking that Cosby speak to young men and women about the judicial system and how it can be used for "personal agenda and political ambitions."

"They feel that the young men and women need to be aware that Mr. Cosby was given a deal to never be criminally charged" in the Andrea Constand case, he said.

A town hall will be held in Birmingham in July, Wyatt said. He didn't identify the date or location or any other cities that will be visited.

Also taking part in the TV interview was Wyatt associate Ebonee Benson, who had read comments from Cosby's wife, Camille, slamming prosecutors after the trial's end last weekend in Norristown, Pennsylvania.

"Laws are changing," Benson said on Thursday. "The statute of limitations for victims of sexual assault are being extended. So this is why people need to be educated on a brush against the shoulder, you know anything at this point can be considered sexual assault. And it's ... a good thing to be educated about the law."

Lecturing isn't new for Cosby. In recent years, the comedian and actor became known for scolding fellow African-Americans for poor grammar, sloppy dress and not valuing education, critiques that drew fire from some as elitist.

It also led indirectly to the reopening of the examination of his past.

In 2014, black standup comedian Hannibal Buress slammed Cosby on stage, calling him a self-righteous scold and adding, "You rape women, Bill Cosby."

Video of Buress' remarks was widely viewed online, and a number of women came forward to share similar stories alleging sexual abuse by Cosby. Prosecutors ultimately reopened Constand's case.

During the trial, Constand testified that Cosby drugged and molested her at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004. Cosby did not testify during the trial, but has said his contact with the former director of women's basketball operations at his alma mater, Temple University, was consensual.

A juror in Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial said Thursday that some jurors were concerned that prosecutors waited 10 years to charge him, expressing suspicion that politics had played a role in the case.

The juror told The Associated Press that the panel was almost evenly split in its deliberations, with a similar number of jurors wanting to convict the 79-year-old entertainer as acquit him.

The AP does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

George Orwell's son says his father's '1984' was 'prescient'

The audience at the opening night on Broadway of a new stage adaptation of George Orwell's dystopian fantasy "1984" will include a special guest — the author's son.

Richard Blair, whose father finished the book in 1949 when he was a young boy, was in New York on Thursday to cheer on the cast amid a huge jump in interest of his father's nightmarish vison of the future.

"His novel '1984' was his take on what could possibly happen — not necessarily will happen — but, as it turned out, it was really quite prescient," said Blair. "Crickey, it's still fresh today as it was then."

The novel tells the story of a man who works at the Ministry of Truth falsifying war news and promoting adoration of the mythical leader Big Brother. The play version stars Olivia Wilde, Tom Sturridge and Reed Birney.

Orwell's portrait of a government that manufactures its own facts, demands total obedience and demonizes foreign enemies has enjoyed renewed attention of late, along with other dystopian tales, like Hulu's version of "The Handmaid's Tale."

One edition of "1984" saw sales jump by 10,000 percent since January, when Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway defended incorrect claims as "alternative facts." It instantly drew comparisons to Orwell's terms "doublethink" and "newspeak" and to the type of government manipulation the author wrote about nearly 70 years ago.

His son said his father's lesson is timeless: "Man has been doing this to himself now since he came out of the trees," said Blair, a retired engineer. "Man is always trying to put one over on his fellow man and get the upper hand."

Orwell, the pen name for Eric Arthur Blair, seemed to predict the government's mass surveillance programs and data mining in the age of Facebook and WikiLeaks. But his son has seen his father's profile jump every few years, surviving the end of the Cold War and thriving under the Trump administration.

"As the decades have gone by, world events tend to collide with '1984' and suddenly everyone wakes up and says, 'Oh my goodness. This is a bit Orwellian, isn't it?' And a lot of them rush and start buying '1984' and realizing that fiction is imitating life or life is imitating fiction," said Blair.

___

Online: http://www.RevisedTruth.com

___

Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

Colbert goes to Russia, vows to search for Comey 'tapes'

Stephen Colbert is on a mission to Russia.

The host of CBS' "The Late Show" is on assignment there for a future broadcast, the network said Thursday.

Colbert, whose steady political wisecracks have been accompanied by a rise in his ratings, wasted no time in taking a dig at President Donald Trump over the possibility of tapes involving fired FBI Director James Comey.

"Don't worry, Mr. President. I'm in Russia. If the "tapes" exist, I'll bring you back a copy!" Colbert tweeted.

His message came after Trump said on Twitter that he has no recordings of his private conversations with Comey, despite an earlier suggestion that they might exist.

Colbert also posted a photo of himself wearing a trench coat and in front of a grand building that appeared to be the Winter Palace in St. Petersburg.

A CBS spokeswoman said she had no information on where Colbert was visiting or how the material he was gathering in Russia would be used.

Family: Peter Tosh's son left in coma following jail beating

The family of the late reggae icon and marijuana activist Peter Tosh is seeking answers after they say his son was left in a coma following an attack in a New Jersey jail, where he was serving a six-month sentence on pot possession charges.

Jawara McIntosh has been hospitalized since suffering traumatic brain injuries in the attack in February at the Bergen County jail, where he was after pleading guilty to marijuana possession, his family said.

McIntosh, of Boston, performed under the stage name Tosh1. His father was a Jamaican-born musician and activist who started the Wailers along with Bob Marley. His 1976 hit "Legalize It" remains a rallying cry for those pushing to make marijuana legal.

Jawara McIntosh is also a pro-marijuana activist and performed the song outside of the New Jersey statehouse in April 2014 during a rally pushing for state and federal lawmakers to legalize or decriminalize marijuana.

Attorney Jasmine Rand said Thursday the family has filed a notice that it plans to sue the county and also wants the U.S. Justice Department to investigate. McIntosh is hospitalized in Boston and remains unresponsive and in a coma, suffering from brain damage, she said.

"My heart cries not knowing what happened to my son," said his mother, Melody Cunningham. "Not being able to talk to him because of the condition that he's in. (I'm) trying to be strong for him, I have to be strong for him."

His sister, Niambe McIntosh, said that they haven't been given any solid information about what happened. Rand said the county hasn't been forthcoming about providing evidence about what happened.

A spokesman for the Bergen County sheriff's office said he was not immediately able to comment Thursday.

McIntosh was arrested in New Jersey in June 2013 after police said they found more than 65 pounds of marijuana in the trunk of his rental car.

His family says that he is a Rastafarian like his father and was fighting for marijuana legalization. Tosh was killed in Jamaica in 1987 during a home invasion robbery.

"A lot of his music is inspired by the Rastafarian culture, by getting the truth out there. My father was a human rights activist and all of his music was about uplifting and educating people about some of the conditions out there," Niambe McIntosh said. "But also my father was an activist for the legalization of cannabis. That's also another avenue that my brother Jawara kind of walked into and upheld. He was also an advocate for legalization of cannabis."

Rastafarians regard cannabis as a sacrament.

McIntosh has four children, including an 11-year-old daughter who performed a song she wrote for him at his hospital bedside, Niambe McIntosh said.

"When you're faced with such a travesty you have to find strength and hope," she said.

___

Contact Cornfield at https://www.twitter.com/JoshCornfield

’Downton Abbey’ the movie in the works, production to start next year

Downton Abbey” the movie is in the works, with production scheduled to begin next year.

The popular, award-winning PBS television drama, which ended in 2015, focused on the lives of an aristocratic British family, the Granthams, and their family of servants.

>> Read more trending news

The historical TV series, starring Dame Maggie Smith and Elizabeth McGovern, among others, was written by Julian Fellowes, and he’s also working on the movie script, too, according to The Associated Press.

“We are working on getting the script right, and then we’ve got to figure out how to get the (cast) together, because as you know, people go on and do other things. But we’re hopeful to make a movie sometime next year,” NBCUniversal International Studios president Michael Edlestein said. 

>> Related: Ron Howard tapped to direct Han Solo stand-alone film

Edlestein also said he hopes to reassemble the critically acclaimed cast for the film, but cast members at an “Downton Abbey” exhibition in Singapore were not aware of production plans for the upcoming movie, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

 

In the stars: New John Green novel coming in October

John Green fans, mark your calendar.

The author of the million-selling "The Fault in Our Stars" has a new novel coming Oct. 10, Dutton Books announced Thursday. The book is called "Turtles All the Way Down" and tells of a 16-year girl in search of a missing billionaire as she copes with mental illness. "Turtles" is Green's first book since "Fault in Our Stars," which came out in 2012. According to Dutton, the new release is "about lifelong friendship, the intimacy of an unexpected reunion, Star Wars fan fiction, and tuatara. But at its heart is Aza Holmes, a young woman navigating daily existence within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts."

Green, 39, said in a statement that he had been working on "Turtles" for a long time.

"This is my first attempt to write directly about the kind of mental illness that has affected my life since childhood, so while the story is fictional, it is also quite personal," said Green, who has spoken publicly about his struggles with obsessive-compulsive disorder and anxiety. He is one of the world's most loved authors and sales just for "The Fault in Our Stars," the tearjerker about two teen cancer patients, tops 45 million copies. "The Fault in Our Stars" was adapted into a movie of the same name starring Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort.

Green's other books include "Paper Towns" and "Looking for Alaska."

The Latest: Bill Cosby spokesman says town halls are planned

The Latest on the release of jurors' names in the Bill Cosby sexual assault case (all times local):

6:15 p.m.

A spokesman for Bill Cosby says a series of town halls is planned to help educate young people about the problems their misbehavior could create.

Spokesman Andrew Wyatt tells a Birmingham, Alabama, TV station Cosby is eager to get back to work following a mistrial over the weekend in his suburban Philadelphia sexual assault trial.

Wyatt said Thursday the issue "is bigger than Bill Cosby" and can affect any young person, especially young athletes. He says young people need to know what they may face when "they're hanging out and partying" and doing "certain things" they shouldn't.

Cosby was accused of drugging and molesting a woman in 2004. He says the encounter was consensual.

A juror tells ABC News the jury couldn't reach a consensus after voting 10-2 to convict on two counts against Cosby.

___

1:10 p.m.

A juror in Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial says the panel was almost evenly split in its deliberations.

The juror told The Associated Press on Thursday that a similar number of jurors wanted to convict the 79-year-old entertainer as acquit him.

He's the second juror to speak out after the jury deadlocked in the Pennsylvania case. A mistrial was declared Saturday after 52 hours of deliberations.

Another juror told ABC News that jurors voted 10-2 to convict Cosby on two counts. The juror who spoke to the AP confirmed that vote but said three people then changed their minds. He said the panel was typically more evenly split.

The juror spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity in order to discuss the sensitive deliberations.

— Associated Press writer Joe Mandak

___

1:05 a.m.

A juror says after 52 hours of deliberations, two holdouts in Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial outside Philadelphia refused to convict the 79-year-old comedian.

The juror, who spoke to ABC News on condition of anonymity, says the jury couldn't reach a consensus after voting 10-2 to convict on the first and third counts and 11-1 to acquit on the second count.

The juror says they initially voted overwhelmingly to acquit Cosby on all three counts of aggravated indecent assault.

ABC published the interview with the juror on Wednesday after Judge Steven O'Neill ordered the public release of the jurors' names, granting a request by a dozen media organizations, including The Associated Press and the major TV networks.

The judge declared a mistrial on Saturday. Prosecutors plan to try Cosby again.

Courteney Cox regrets plastic surgery

In an interview with New Beauty, former “Friends” star Courteney Cox opened up about the plastic surgery that she got as a younger woman --  some that she’s come to regret and in some cases is having reversed.

>> Read more trending news

“Hollywood makes it hard; this business makes it harder. I grew up thinking appearance was the most important thing. That as long as I looked OK, I would be OK, which got me into trouble […] I was trying so hard to keep up, and that actually made things worse. Now, I’m as natural as I can be,” she said.

RELATED: “Friends” fans rejoice! Courteney Cox and Lisa Kudrow played “Friends” trivia, and it was everything

Cox talked about her old outlook on plastic surgery.

“What would end up happening is that you go to a doctor who would say, ‘You look great, but what would help is a little injection here or filler there,’” she told New Beauty. “So you walk out and you don’t look so bad and you think, no one noticed — it’s good. Then somebody tells you about another doctor […] The next thing you know you’re layered and layered and layered. You have no idea because it’s gradual until you go, ‘Oh shit, this doesn’t look right.’”

Now, she says there’s a lot less than used to meet the eye, and that people are (once again) seeing her as she really is.

“I’ve had all my fillers dissolved. I’m as natural as I can be. I feel better because I look like myself,” she said. “I think that I now look more like the person that I was. […] Things are going to change. Everything’s going to drop. I was trying to make it not drop, but that made me look fake. You need movement in your face, especially if you have thin skin like I do. Those aren’t wrinkles—they’re smile lines. I’ve had to learn to embrace movement and realize that fillers are not my friend.”

See more at New Beauty.

Louis Vuitton channels escapism at sweltering Paris menswear

Dries Van Noten went 80s, Rick Owens dabbled in abstract musing while sweltering celebrity guests such as model-actress Naomi Campbell got an exotic taste of wanderlust from Louis Vuitton.

Here are the highlights of Thursday's menswear collections for spring-summer 2018 at Paris Fashion Week.

LOUIS VUITTON'S GREAT ESCAPE

The sun beat down on VIP guests attending Louis Vuitton's open air show inside the storied Palais Royal gardens.

If some were dreaming of being whisked away from the stifling heat in the French capital, they were in luck. Designer Kim Jones channeled wanderlust and the magic of isolated world archipelagos for Vuitton's next spring-summer collection. It was a welcome escapism.

Starting with Hawaii, Jones reimagined the familiar Aloha shirt with a shiny sheer outer layer that evoked the sparkling ocean. But his collection was more about island-hopping and a sense of spirited adventure than any one geographical location.

"I was inspired by the idea of an island and of travel. Of moving easily from place to place, and experiencing these different pockets of civilization," Jones said.

Sneakers and logo-adorned sandals, indigo denim hats and oversize Monogram bags slung across the shoulder accessorized his relaxed looks. Baggy pants — gently pleated and loose at the hip — were on-trend.

Sports also was very much in the air, inspired, the fashion house said, by the extreme sports often practiced in far-flung locations. Neoprene scuba tops and shorts were reimagined in luxurious multi-colored bonded leather.

This was backpacking and trekking — but not for the budget traveler.

___

FRONT ROW

Naomi Campbell caused a stir when she arrived at the Vuitton show at the last minute, joining American rappers Travis Scott and Tyga in the front row.

Campbell was passing through Paris after attending the Cannes Lions Festival, where she hung out with The Weeknd.

Nearby, British singer Lily Allen, a friend of designer Kim Jones, sported a sheeny Louis Vuitton menswear look and said she was excited to be able to make the show.

"It usually falls on the Glastonbury (festival) weekend, this show, so I'm never really around. But I'm not there this year so I thought I'd pop over," she told The Associated Press.

"Me and Kim (Jones) used to live together years ago. We were flatmates. He's the loveliest person in the world. He's one of my treasured friends," she said.

___

RICK OWENS' INDEFATIGABLE CREATIVITY

The ever-creative Rick Owens doesn't so much put on fashion shows as transport guests to a parallel universe for 15 minutes each season.

The U.S.-born designer was in fine form Thursday with a surreal collection that almost looked as if it would be at home in outer space. Models stomped in huge moon boots in black and gray across the shimmering metal podium structure outside Paris' Palais de Tokyo.

White punk vests with cords that evoked alien-like sinews exposed flesh on waif-like male models with visible bones. Torsos sported large sections of voluminous shiny technical fabric that evoked space suit textiles.

But the styles might also have been inspired by punks, goths, soldiers and even sculpture. And that's the point: Owens' clothes intentionally provoke myriad interpretations.

Coats came sleeveless or had long arms that obscured the hands. Some jackets were rendered off-kilter and otherworldly by tiny silhouettes that scrunched up the models' torsos.

___

ISSEY MIYAKE'S DESERT TREK

It was man versus the elements for Issey Miyake.

Designer Yusuke Takahashi imagined a journey into the inhumanly hot desert for the spring-summer collection.

And sweating fashionistas — who fanned themselves with program notes against the sweltering Paris heat wave — didn't need to exert themselves trying to imagine how that desert might feel.

Loose double-face cotton jackets, sometimes in a cross-over style, were presented in earth colors. Below, baggy cotton North African-style pants with pleats and a floppy waist fastening followed pants cut above the ankle with a rippled texture that evoked the roughness of sand.

Later, the desert was suggested again in the rippled patterning on some decidedly un-summerlike dark coats. One enveloping, oversized, shin-length coat provoked moans of sympathy for the male model from guests in the front row.

But the program notes reassured that the fabric was "lightweight and designed with functional elements in mind."

___

DRIES VAN NOTEN'S BEAUTY

It was in the former Paris offices of French newspaper Liberation that Belgian designer Dries Van Noten chose to showcase his collection.

Male models walked by against a backdrop of shelves with myriad multicolored files. And a retro-bookish mood filtered into the styles as long socks that were pulled to mid-calf in varying colors.

Thursday's elegant show marked a return to the '80s. It's a significant decade for Van Noten, as it marked his breakthrough as a designer as part of the radical Antwerp Six group of fashion designers.

High-waisted pants and shorts alongside soft oversize '80s jackets were worn with oversize shirts. They were rendered thoughtfully in tonal colors such as ochre, sienna, dull green, chestnut and cadmium yellow.

Suede boots added a touch of class. While, floral and fern prints betrayed Van Noten's love of flowers.

The collection was muted but that did not detract from its beauty.

___

This story has been corrected to show that Vuitton designer Kim Jones is a man, not a woman.

___

Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K

Ron Howard takes helm of Han Solo 'Star Wars' film

Ron Howard is taking command of the Han Solo "Star Wars" spinoff after the surprise departure of directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller.

Lucasfilm announced their replacement director Thursday, two days after Lord and Miller left the project over creative differences. Howard gives the reeling production a veteran hand in the wake of Lord and Miller's exit in the midst of shooting.

Kathleen Kennedy, president of Lucasfilm, said filming will resume July 10. The untitled film, which stars Alden Ehrenreich as a young Han Solo, is about three-quarters of the way through production. It has several weeks of shooting left, along with reshoots.

Howard has shepherded Oscar winners like "A Beautiful Mind" and "Apollo 13." But his recent films, including the "Da Vinci Code" sequel "Inferno" and "In the Heart of the Sea," have struggled at the box office. He also has some history with Lucasfilm. He helmed the 1988 fantasy "Willow" and starred in George Lucas' 1973 breakthrough "American Graffiti."

"We have a wonderful script, an incredible cast and crew, and the absolute commitment to make a great movie," said Kennedy.

Disney reiterated the film's release date of May 25 next year, suggesting that — at least for now — the "Star Wars" spinoff will be released on schedule. Representatives for the studio declined to comment.

How producers and the Directors Guild of America handle the film's directing credit will also be closely watched. DGA rules govern the crediting of directors.

Lord and Miller had previously been considered among Hollywood's most sought-after directors, having turned "The Lego Movie" and "21 Jump Street" into unexpected and widely praised comedy hits. But reports have circulated that the duo, who favor improvisation and irreverent humor, clashed with Kennedy and co-writer Lawrence Kasdan, a "Star Wars" veteran and executive producer.

"Unfortunately, our vision and process weren't aligned with our partners on this project. We normally aren't fans of the phrase 'creative differences' but for once this cliche is true," the directors said earlier in a joint statement. "We are really proud of the amazing and world-class work of our cast and crew."

___

Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP

Coal company sues HBO's John Oliver for defamation

Coal company Murray Energy has sued HBO and its Sunday-night host, John Oliver, for what it says was a "false and malicious broadcast" last Sunday evening. It's seeking financial damages and a court order barring rebroadcasts of the segment's "defamatory statements."

Oliver's "Last Week Tonight" coal segment criticized the Trump administration's effort to revive the industry, saying coal jobs have dropped for decades and other energy alternatives are driving the industry's decline.

He ribbed Murray Energy's CEO Robert Murray, who blames regulatory efforts by the Obama administration for damaging the coal industry. He said the 77-year-old looked like a "geriatric Dr. Evil" and noted that the company had fought against coal safety regulations.

The Ohio company sued the comedian Wednesday afternoon in circuit court in West Virginia, saying that he tried to embarrass Murray by making fun of his age and appearance and made false statements about a 2007 collapse of a Utah mine, when nine miners died. The company said Oliver ignored information it sent the show that it says showed an earthquake caused the mine's collapse and that the show made no mention of "the efforts Mr. Murray personally made to save the trapped miners."

An HBO spokesman says the show didn't violate Murray Energy's rights or those of Murray. Oliver noted on the show that Murray Energy has a litigious past, and last month sued the New York Times for libel.

Murray Energy employs about 5,400 people, about half of those in West Virginia.

Former US attorney Preet Bharara has a book deal

Preet Bharara, the former U.S. Attorney fired earlier this year by President Donald Trump, has a book deal.

Alfred A. Knopf announced Thursday that Bharara was working on a book about the "search for justice" that would come out early in 2019. Bharara was U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York for 7 1/2 years. His prominent cases included the conviction of Sheldon Silver, former Speaker of the New York State Assembly. Bharara was fired abruptly by Trump in March and has since said the president tried to cultivate a relationship with him, potentially compromising his independence. He has called the conversations "weird and peculiar."

Bharara expects to "address the circumstances that led to his firing," Knopf spokesman Paul Bogaards said Thursday.

Bharara said in a statement issued through Knopf that his book, not yet titled, was about law, but also "integrity" and "moral reasoning."

"The law is merely an instrument, and without the involvement of human hands, it is as lifeless and uninspiring as a violin kept in its case," Bharara said. "People will regard a result as just if they regard the process leading to it as fair and if they believe the people responsible for it are fair-minded. That is the process I want to illuminate in this book."

Shannen Doherty flaunts growing hair months after going into remission

Shannen Doherty is loving her new, curly locks.

>> Read more trending news

In a sweet photo update with husband Kurt Iswarienko, Doherty showed off her new look as her hair grows back following months of cancer treatments.

“I think my husband and I are morphing into each other,” she wrote with the hashtag #curlyhairdontcare in a post on Instagram. The photo shows the two on a trip in Tulum, Mexico.

In April, the “Beverly Hills, 90210” alum announced she was in remission in an emotional Instagram post to fans.

“Moments. They happen. Today was and is a moment,” she wrote. “What does remission mean? I heard that word and have no idea how to react. Good news? YES. Overwhelming. YES. Now more waiting.”

She continued: “As every single one of my fellow cancer family knows, the next five years is crucial. Reoccurrences happen all the time. Many of you have shared that very story with me. So with a heart that is certainly lighter, I wait.”

Doherty chronicled her cancer battle on social media and shortly after her diagnosis, shared the heart wrenching moment she decided to cut her hair off with the help and support of her close friend, Anne Marie Kortright, and mother, Rosa.

Prince Harry: No one in royal family wants to rise to throne

Britain's Prince Harry has suggested that no one in the royal family really wishes to rise to the throne — and that it is duty, rather than desire, that prompts them to continue serving the British people.

In an interview with Newsweek magazine, Harry said the House of Windsor is "not doing this for ourselves but for the greater good of the people." He also spoke openly about his distress at having to walk behind his mother's coffin as a 12-year-old boy in full public view, saying: "I don't think any child should be asked to do that, under any circumstances."

The 32-year-old royal was recalling the day in 1997 when he joined his brother Prince William, then 15, and other members of the royal family in a funeral procession through London's streets for Princess Diana, who died in a car accident.

"My mother had just died, and I had to walk a long way behind her coffin, surrounded by thousands of people watching me while millions more did on television," he said.

Harry made candid remarks about being a royal — and his determination to lead as ordinary a life as he could.

"Is there any one of the royal family who wants to be king or queen? I don't think so, but we will carry out our duties at the right time," he said.

He does his own shopping, he added — and would continue to do so "even if I was king."

"People would be amazed by the ordinary life William and I live," he said. "My mother took a huge part in showing me an ordinary life, including taking me and my brother to see homeless people. Thank goodness I'm not completely cut off from reality."

Asked whether he worried that an "ordinary" royal would make the family "too accessible," Harry said: "It's a tricky balancing act. We don't want to dilute the magic ... The British public and the whole world need institutions like it."

Patriots' Malcolm Mitchell has deal with Scholastic Books

New England Patriots wide receiver Malcolm Mitchell can be sweet when he wants to be.

Mitchell has a three-book deal with Scholastic, the children's publisher told The Associated Press on Thursday. The books include a newly illustrated edition of his self-published "The Magician's Hat," to come out next May, and two more original works.

Mitchell is a literacy advocate who founded the "Read With Malcolm" program. With New England, Mitchell caught 32 passes last year during the regular season and another six in the Super Bowl, when the Patriots came from behind and defeated the Atlanta Falcons 34-28.

Prince Harry opens up about Diana's funeral, doesn't think any royals want to be king or queen

When he was just 12 years old, Prince Harry’s mother, Princess Diana, died in a car accident, and participating in her highly publicized funeral is something the now 32-year-old royal will never forget.

>> Prince George, Princess Charlotte steal the show at Queen’s Trooping the Color parade

“My mother had just died, and I had to walk a long way behind her coffin, surrounded by thousands of people watching me while millions more did on television,” he recalled the emotionally difficult moment to Newsweek. “I don’t think any child should be asked to do that, under any circumstances. I don’t think it would happen today.”

>> PHOTOS: Prince Harry through the years

Harry went on to live several years in “total chaos” as he tried to deal with his grief, acting out and ignoring his emotions. But finally one day, he realized he needed professional help and decided he wanted to “to fix the mistakes” he felt he was making. Now, he sees his position as royal as a “force for good” and enjoys getting to help other people going through tough situations.

>> Pippa Middleton ties the knot with James Matthews in ‘almost royal’ wedding

"My mother died when I was very young. I didn’t want to be in the position I was in, but I eventually pulled my head out of the sand, started listening to people and decided to use my role for good,” he said. “I am now fired up and energized and love charity stuff, meeting people and making them laugh. I sometimes still feel I am living in a goldfish bowl, but I now manage it better. I still have a naughty streak, too, which I enjoy and is how I relate to those individuals who have got themselves into trouble.”

>> Read more trending news

As he and brother Prince William prepare to take on more royal responsibilities, they want to make sure to “carry on the positive atmosphere that the queen has achieved for over 60 years” by continuing Queen Elizabeth II’s legacy of charity work.

>> PHOTOS: Charming Princess Charlotte, Prince George at Trooping the Color parade

“We are involved in modernizing the British monarchy,” Harry said. “We are not doing this for ourselves but for the greater good of the people […] Is there any one of the royal family who wants to be king or queen? I don’t think so, but we will carry out our duties at the right time.”

Read more here.

Results 1 - 20 of 100 next >