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Posted: April 21, 2017

With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later

FILE - In this Nov. 22, 2015, file photo, Prince presents the award for favorite album - soul/R&B at the American Music Awards in Los Angeles. Prince died at his home in Chanhassen, Minn. on April 21, 2016 at the age of 57. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 22, 2015, file photo, Prince presents the award for favorite album - soul/R&B at the American Music Awards in Los Angeles. Prince died at his home in Chanhassen, Minn. on April 21, 2016 at the age of 57. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP, File)

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            With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later
FILE In this Nov. 2, 2016 file photo, a replica of the Memorial Fence is shown at Prince's Paisley Park in Chanhassen, Minn. Paisley Park, home and studio of the late musician Prince, is open for public tours. At his home and recording studio-turned-museum, a full four days of events are on tap for the one-year anniversary of his death on April 21, 2016, ranging from concert performances by the great one's former band mates to panel discussions on his legacy. Fans who can't afford those high-dollar tickets can head to a street party outside the club he made famous in 'Purple Rain.'

            With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later
FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2007, file photo, Prince performs during the halftime show at the Super Bowl XLI NFL football game at Dolphin Stadium in Miami. Prince died at his home in Chanhassen, Minn. on April 21, 2016 at the age of 57.

            With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later
FILE - In this April 22, 2016 file photo, a woman places flowers at a memorial at First Avenue in Minneapolis where pop super star Prince often performed. At his home and recording studio-turned-museum, a full four days of events are on tap for the one-year anniversary of his death on April 21, 2016, ranging from concert performances by the great one's former band mates to panel discussions on his legacy. Fans who can't afford those high-dollar tickets can head to a street party outside the club he made famous in 'Purple Rain.'

            With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later
FILE - In this Aug 28, 2016, file photo, a mural honoring the late Prince adorns a building in the Uptown area of Minneapolis. In addition, at his home and recording studio-turned-museum, a full four days of events are on tap for the one-year anniversary of his death on April 21, 2016, ranging from concert performances by the great one's former band mates to panel discussions on his legacy. Fans who can't afford those high-dollar tickets can head to a street party outside the club he made famous in 'Purple Rain.'

            With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later
In this April 4, 2017 photo, graffiti memorials to the late Prince mark the Riley Creek underpass which has become the new graffiti bridge near his home and studio in Chanhassen, Minn. Fans have been marking it since the rock star's death from an accidental overdose on April 21, 2016. At his home and recording studio-turned-museum, a full four days of events are on tap for the one-year anniversary of his death, ranging from concert performances by the great one's former band mates to panel discussions on his legacy. Fans who can't afford those high-dollar tickets can head to a street party outside the club he made famous in 'Purple Rain.'

            With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later
FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2016 file photo, a Prince costume and motorcycle are on display at Prince's Paisley Park in Chanhassen, Minn. Paisley Park, home and studio of the late musician Prince, is open for public tours. At his home and recording studio-turned-museum, a full four days of events are on tap for the one-year anniversary of his death on April 21, 2016, ranging from concert performances by the great one's former band mates to panel discussions on his legacy. Fans who can't afford those high-dollar tickets can head to a street party outside the club he made famous in 'Purple Rain.'

            With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later
FILE - In this April 22, 2016 file photo, Scott Ewing and his wife Gina Easley, view Prince's Purple Rain outfit on display at the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul, Minn. The one-year anniversary of Prince's death from an overdose will be marked April 21, 2017. At his home and recording studio-turned-museum, a full four days of events are on tap for the one-year anniversary of his death, ranging from concert performances by the great one's former band mates to panel discussions on his legacy. Fans who can't afford those high-dollar tickets can head to a street party outside the club he made famous in 'Purple Rain.'

            With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later
FILE - In this Jan. 22, 1985 file photo, Prince performs in concert at Riverfront Coliseum during his Purple Rain Tour in Cincinnati, Ohio. Prince died at his home in Chanhassen, Minn. on April 21, 2016 at the age of 57.

            With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later
FILE - In this Jan. 11, 1985, file photo, Prince performs before a sold-out audience in Houston. Prince died at his his home on April 21, 2016. For Prince fans, the Friday, April 21, 2017, one-year anniversary of his shocking death from an accidental drug overdose will be a time for sadness and celebration. At his Paisley Park home and recording studio-turned-museum outside Minneapolis, four days of events are on tap, ranging from concert performances by his former bandmates to panel discussions on his legacy.

The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS —

For Prince fans, the one-year anniversary of his shocking death from an accidental drug overdose is a time for sadness and celebration.

It was a year ago Friday that the music superstar was found dead at Paisley Park, the suburban Minneapolis recording complex where he lived.

Fans from around the globe have flocked to Paisley Park, now a museum, for a four-day celebration that includes performances by Prince's former bandmates and panel discussions. Fans who didn't want to pop for a $549 ticket to get into Paisley could head to a street party outside First Avenue, the club he made famous in "Purple Rain." And the Minnesota History Center is staging a special exhibit of Prince memorabilia, including his iconic "Purple Rain" costume.

Here's a look at how some of Prince's fans are remembering his legacy and mourning his loss.

A 6-HOUR DRIVE FOR PRINCE

Mary Adams and her 10-year-old daughter, Rachel, visited First Avenue on Friday to pose for a picture in front of Prince's star, repainted from silver to gold soon after his death.

The duo drove six hours from Kansas City, Missouri, listening to Prince the whole way.

"I needed to come here," said Adams, 50. "This is where it began."

Adams grew up listening to Prince. After he died, she got her first tattoo — Prince's glyph adorned with open lilies — on her arm.

"He'll always be with me now," she said.

Adams said Prince's tenacity and drive to do things his own way helped Adams, an actor, realize it was OK to be herself.

"He inspired me to be me, and I love him for it — and I always will," she said, choking up.

She planned pilgrimages to the Minneapolis house made famous in the movie "Purple Rain" and to Prince's old neighborhood. She and her daughter went to Paisley Park but weren't allowed to leave a memorial — a purple lei and a card — at the fence outside.

"This should be a time when we should all be able to go there and pay our respects and say our goodbyes — and it feels like you have to pay a small fortune to get in, and it breaks my heart," she said.

"I don't think he would dig that."

FEELING THE LOSS

Malinda Listenbee, 46, of Huntsville, Alabama, wore a Prince shirt as she and her husband Ulton waited to enter Paisley Park.

She recalled hearing about Prince's death a year ago by overhearing nurses talk about it while at a doctor's appointment. She said it felt like she lost a family member.

"He was a caring person, a giving person, and it just felt like I knew him," she said.

The couple had already been to Paisley Park once, in November, when they took a VIP tour and played on Prince's ping-pong table.

"I feel like this is a time to celebrate," she said. "This is a happy space."

PRINCE'S PURPLE ARMY

Rhonda Soso, of Compton, California, was among fans shooting pictures outside Paisley Park. She wore a pendant of Prince's symbol, which she had also spray-painted in black along the legs of her white pants.

Soso said she was there "just to be part of the purple family, the purple army."

She said it was difficult to no longer have Prince, but "his spirit, his energy is still with us."

LOCALS LOVE THEIR PRINCE

Liz Larson, 36, of Minneapolis, stopped by the star outside First Avenue on her way to work Friday to pay her respects.

She said her mother was a singer in the 1980s and would sometimes hang out with Prince at First Avenue. Larson remembers being at concerts there herself when Prince would suddenly show up to play.

Prince's music "was something you could always put on if you wanted to make people dance at a party," she said. "It would always shift the mood."

Larson felt isolated last year when Prince died — traveling on business with co-workers who didn't share her grief. This year, she planned to be at First Avenue's dance party Saturday with her husband and 6-month-old son — in a Prince onesie.

Ryan Matson, 39, of Ramsey, also stopped by Prince's star to get a photo. He said he had always liked his music, but "after he died, you started liking his songs all over again."

He planned to go home after work, have a few beers and watch "Purple Rain."

__

Baenen reported from Chanhassen, Minnesota. Associated Press writer Steve Karnowski contributed.


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