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Great Pyramid hidden area found

In a first since the 19th century, a hidden chamber within one of the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World is hidden no more.

Scientists have discovered a 153-foot-long void above the Great Pyramid’s Grand Gallery, National Geographic reported. The area is also 26 feet high. 

So far experts are not sure why it is there or if it holds anything.

>> Read more trending news 

Scientists from France and Japan on the ScanPyramids team announced their finding two years after they studied the structure. They used muography that shows changes in density inside rock structures, The BBC reported.

A smaller, similar void had been found on the pyramid’s north face.

The team will not call the voids chambers, of which there are three large chambers already discovered, along with several passageways.

Some believe the void could have been built to relieve pressure and stress above the King’s Chamber. Others say that it isn’t the case, that it is too large to relieve the weight of the pyramid, The BBC reported.

Now the challenge that faces the experts is how to get a look inside the void without damaging or destroying the ancient pyramid. 

One scientist suggested drilling a 3 centimeter hole that they could use to fly a robot through and into the area, but Egyptian officials would have to approve it, The BBC reported.

The Great Pyramid was built during Egypt’s Old Kingdom’s Fourth Dynasty about 4,500 years ago by pharaoh Khufu, National Geographic reported

Girls with nagging moms grow up to be more successful, study says

Did your mom often nag you about homework and chores as a child? 

Her fussing may be the root of your success, according to a report

Researchers from the University of Essex in England conducted an experiment to determine how a girl’s upbringing can affect her life as an adult.

To do so, they examined the lives of about 15,000 girls between the ages of 13 and 14, following them between the years of 2004 and 2010.

After analyzing the results, they found that daughters with stricter parents were more likely to attend college and snag higher-paying jobs. They were also less likely to become teen moms. In fact, parents with high expectations were believed to reduce a teenager’s chance of becoming pregnant by 4 percent, compared to those with “middling aspirations.”

On the other hand, the scientists correlated less pushy moms and dads with poorer grades among kids as well as low-earning wages and unemployment. 

“In many cases we succeeded in doing what we believed was more convenient for us, even when this was against our parents’ will,” said lead researcher Ericka Rascon-Ramirez. “But no matter how hard we tried to avoid our parents’ recommendations, it is likely that they ended up influencing, in a more subtle manner, choices that we had considered extremely personal.”

Researchers presented their findings at the Royal Economic Society Conference in the U.K. Want to learn more about the findings? Read additional details at the Daily Mail

8 killed in New York terror attack: What we know about the victims

A driver in a rented pickup truck plowed into pedestrians and bicyclists on a path in New York City on Tuesday, killing eight people and injuring 12 others.

>> Read more trending news

Police said the suspect in the case, 29-year-old Sayfullo Saipov, was shot in the abdomen by a police officer after the truck collided with a school bus. Saipov, who came to the United States from Uzbekistan in 2010, carried out the attack in ISIS’s name, police said Wednesday.

>> Related: Who is Sayfullo Saipov, New York City terror attack suspect? 

Investigators said 20 people were injured in the attack, six of which were pronounced dead at the scene. Two other people died at hospital, according to authorities.

Here’s what we know about the victims:

Cab mounts pavement, crashes in London

A taxicab crashed into a sidewalk in London on Wednesday, scattering pedestrians and causing chaos one day after a man plowed a pickup truck into people on a bicycle path in New York City, according to witnesses.

>> Read more trending news

Police said that the accident did not appear to be terror related.

Video posted on social media from the scene in Covent Garden showed multiple police cars in the area following the crash.

Trump tears into Russia 'dossier,' Hillary Clinton and Uranium One in Twitter spree

President Donald Trump began his Sunday by laying into his political enemies.

>> Reports: First charges filed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller

On Sunday morning, Trump tweeted about the now-infamous “dossier” prepared by intel group Fusion GPS.

Recently, reports revealed the Clinton campaign was one of the major backers of the dossier.

>> Trump ally Roger Stone suspended from Twitter after profanity-laden rant

Trump also tweeted about the “Uranium Deal" – a reference to reportedly unfounded allegations that Hillary Clinton allowed the sale of uranium to Russian energy agency Rosatom in exchange for a $145 million donation to the Clinton Foundation – as well as Clinton’s email scandal. Fact-checking sites such as Snopes and FactCheck.org have disputed those claims.

>> Read more trending news

“There is so much GUILT by Democrats/Clinton, and now the facts are pouring out,” Trump tweeted. “DO SOMETHING!”

Although the tweets came just days after reports that a grand jury approved the first charges filed in special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, White House lawyer Ty Cobb told NBC News that Trump's tweets were not "a reaction to anything involving the special counsel, with whom the White House continues to cooperate."

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

US service member killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash

A U.S. service member was killed and six crew members were injured when a helicopter crashed in Afghanistan, CNN reported Saturday.

>> Read more trending news

The helicopter crashed in the Logar province of Afghanistan on Friday evening, CNN reported, citing a statement from the NATO-led coalition in that country, Operation Resolute Support.

The Logar province is just south of Afghanistan's capital, Kabul.

According to the statement, the crash did not occur because of enemy action.

"We have full accountability of all personnel and the crash site has been secured," the statement said.

"We are deeply saddened by the loss of our comrade," said Army Gen. John Nicholson, Resolute Support commander.

"On behalf of all of Resolute Support, our heartfelt sympathies go out to the families and friends of our fallen comrade and those injured in this unfortunate event."

US defense secretary Mattis visits Korean DMZ

Standing just a few yards away from North Korea, Defense Secretary James Mattis on Friday criticized the country’s “reckless behavior,” adding that the United States and South Korea were committed to a “diplomatic solution,” CNN reported.

>> Read more trending news

Mattis spoke during a visit to the demilitarized zone that divides the two Korean nations As he spoke with his back to North Korea, Mattis said the goal of the United States is not war but rather “the complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearization of the Korean peninsula.”

"North Korean provocations continue to threaten regional and world peace and despite unanimous condemnation by the United Nations' Security Council they still proceed," Mattis said.

Mattis’ trip to South Korea comes a week before President Donald Trump’s visit to Asia next week, CNN reported. The defense secretary spoke to troops at the Yongsan garrison after his visit to the DMZ.

“Ultimately our diplomats have to be backed up by strong soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines,” he said. “So they speak from a position of strength, of combined strength, of alliance strength. Shoulder to shoulder, (South Korea) and the U.S. together.

“You just keep working together and show the world we can do it and we'll buy time for our diplomats to solve this problem, OK?”

10-year-old immigrant with cerebral palsy detained after emergency surgery now with her family

UPDATE Nov. 3: The Associated Press reported Friday that the ACLU has said authorities released the 10-year-old girl to family. 

Original story, Oct. 26:

A 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy who came to the United States from Mexico illegally when she was an infant was detained by Border Patrol agents after undergoing emergency gall bladder surgery in Texas, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

Leticia Gonzalez, an attorney for Rosa Maria Hernandez, told The Associated Press that the girl has “difficulty understanding exactly what’s taking place” and is closer in development to a child who’s 4 or 5 years old.

Rosa Maria was intercepted Tuesday morning by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents while she and her cousin, a U.S. citizen, were being taken by ambulance from Laredo to Corpus Christi, according to the Corpus Christi Caller-Times. Rosa Maria was traveling to get emergency surgery and, on the way, she passed through an immigration checkpoint in Freer, the newspaper reported.

Family members told the San Antonio Express-News that Border Patrol agents told them Tuesday that Rosa Maria had to either go back to Mexico or face a lengthy detention process. 

Family members declined to take her to Mexico and authorities transferred her to a children’s shelter 150 miles away in San Antonio on Wednesday, according to the Express-News.

Gonzalez told the Caller-Times that she asked authorities to release Rosa Maria to family members who are U.S. citizens, but that they refused. She said doctors suggested in hospital discharge papers that Rosa Maria be released to family members post-surgery.

"At this point, our argument to (immigration officials) is there is a doctor's directive, why aren't you following it?" Gonzalez told the Caller-Times.

Rosa Maria’s mother, Felipa Delacruz, told the newspaper that federal agents waited outside her daughter’s hospital room while she was recovering. Delacruz does not have legal immigration status and is in Laredo, the Caller-Times reported.

In a statement released to The Associated Press, Customs and Border Protection officials stood by their decision to detain Rosa Maria, saying that agents were “committed to enforcing the immigration laws of this nation.”

“Once medically cleared, she will be processed accordingly,” the statement said.

U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-San Antonio, blamed the Trump administration for adopting “callous policies” toward immigrants.

“They’re treating her like a hardened convict,” Castro said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Pope Francis makes holy call to space station, gets philosophical with astronauts

In a live streamed video call into the heavens Thursday, Pope Francis connected with astronauts aboard the International Space Agency and jumped right into the big question: What is our place in the universe?

>> Read more trending news

Francis, the first pope to call the space station and second to speak to astronauts orbiting the earth via video call, conversed with Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency, Russian cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin and Sergey Ryazanskiy and NASA astronauts Randy Bresnik, Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba.

During his 23-minute call from the Vatican Library in Rome, Italy, the pope spoke in Italian and Nespoli translated for his fellow crew members.

“Your little glass palace in totality is greater than the sum of its parts, and this is the example that you give us,” Francis said through a translator.

He asked Nespoli, “What are your thoughts regarding the place of man in the universe?" 

“Holy Father, this is a complex question," Nespoli replied in Italian as NASA TV displayed an English translation for viewers. “When we speak of these much more internal questions of where we come from, I remain rather perplexed. I think that our objective here is that of knowing our being and to fill our knowledge to understand what's around us. But on the other hand, an interesting thing is that the more we know, the more we realize how little we know.”

Francis also asked why they became astronauts and what they love about spending time at the ISS.

Ryazanskiy told the pope he was honored to continue his family’s legacy. Ryazanskiy’s grandfather had worked on the launch of the world’s first artificial satellite, Sputnik, which launched in 1957.

Francis, who has long exalted the role of grandparents, marveled at his response. “That's our strength: Never forget roots. It does me good to hear this! Thank you,” he said.

Bresnik described the overwhelming joy of looking outside and seeing “God’s creation from his perspective.”

“As we see the peace and serenity of our planet … there's no borders, no conflict. It's just peaceful,” Breskin said. “We hope that an example of what we can achieve together [in space] sets an example for the rest of the world.”

Pope Francis’ conversation with the astronauts, particularly Russian cosmonauts Misurkin and Ryazanskiy, also marked a small step toward softening Vatican-Russian relations.

When he asked the astronauts what they thought about Italian poet Dante Alighieri’s verse that love is the force that moves the universe, Misurkin said he had been listening to the audiobook of Antoine de St. Exupery’s “The Little Prince” and was moved by the young boy’s understanding of love.

“Love is the force that gives you strength to give your life for someone else,” he told the pope.

Francis, overjoyed by Misurkin’s response, said, “It's clear you have understood the message that St. Exupery so poetically explained, and that you Russians have in your blood, in your humanistic and religious tradition.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Russian helicopter carrying 8 crashes near Norway's Svalbard archipelago

A Russian helicopter with eight people on board went down Thursday in the sea off the coast of Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean, according to officials.

>> Read more trending news

Norwegian search and rescue officials said the helicopter was flying from Pyramiden to Barentsburg when it was reported missing around 3:35 p.m. local time Thursday. It was confirmed down 10 minutes later.

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