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Famous Norman Rockwell study drawing of umpires fetches $1.68M at auction

An original study drawing of a famous illustration by Norman Rockwell sold for $1.68 million Sunday night in Heritage Auctions’ Platinum Night Sports auction.

>> Read more trending news

The 1948 study, or preliminary work, for “Tough Call,” which was used as the April 23, 1949, cover of The Saturday Evening Post, belonged to the family of John “Beans” Reardon, an umpire who was the primary subject of the drawing.

“I need to credit my colleagues in the art division for the assist on this one,” said Chris Ivy, director of sports auctions at the Dallas-based auction house. “This isn’t the first time that we’ve been able to draw from other segments of our million-strong bidding clientele to benefit a sports consignor.”

Reardon’s family had believed the original study they owned was merely a signed print, worth only several hundred dollars, Ivy said. It sold to a buyer who wished to remain anonymous, Ivy said.

The drawing is also known as “Game Called Because of Rain,” “Bottom of the Sixth,” and “The Three Umpires.” Rockwell’s finished painting is on display at the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.

The drawing depicts a game at Brooklyn’s Ebbets Field, with the Dodgers leading the Pittsburgh Pirates 1-0 in the bottom of the sixth inning. Reardon and his fellow umpires are looking skyward, debating whether to call the game due to rain.

Sports memorabilia fetched more than $10.7 million during the two-day auction, which ended Sunday, Ivy said.

New biography about David Bowie reveals details of his wild life

An upcoming biography of David Bowie reveals new details about the singer’s life, including some strange propositions, NME reported.

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“David Bowie: A Life” will be released Sept. 12. Written by Dylan Jones, the biography is described as “intimate a portrait as may ever be drawn” about Bowie, who died Jan. 11, 2016, after an 18-month battle with cancer.

In the book, groupie Josette Caruso describes the time Bowie was offered a “warm, deady body” to have sex with while on tour in Philadelphia in September 1972, NME reported.

According to the Daily Mail, Caruso told how Bowie’s bodyguard answered the door and then called for the singer, looking “white as a sheet.”

“He obviously looked like such a freak that some sick people thought he might be into necrophilia,” Caruso said.

“Who on earth do they think I am? Why would they think I’d be interested in something like that?” Bowie reportedly said.

Other details from the book, according to the Daily Mail:

  • Bowie’s sex addiction drove him to sleep with 13-year-old groupies, engage in orgies and declare he was bisexual.

  • Because of his brother's schizophrenia, he did not like LSD but developed a cocaine habit.

  • Born David Jones, he changed his last name to Bowie -- like the Bowie Knife -- after British media nicknamed Mick Jagger, 'Jagger Dagger' 

The book also gives a detailed insight into the singer’s life from his childhood in Brixton, through his wild and successful music career, to his relatively calm last few years with wife Iman, NME reported.by

“David Bowie was his very own creation, his very own work of art,” Dylan Jones writes.“This was the boy from postwar Brixton with his sights set on the world.”

 

Police name Barcelona attack suspect

Spanish authorities said they are looking for Younes Abouyaaqoub, a suspect in the deadly Barcelona terror attack who remains at large, a spokesman for the Catalan police told CNN on Saturday.

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The spokesman also revealed the names of three of the five suspected terrorists who were killed after a confrontation with police in Cambrils: Moussa Oukabir, Said Aallaa and Mohamed Hychami.

Catalan police had not released the names and pictures of any of the suspects but decided to confirm those details after they began circulating on social media and in news reports, the spokesman told CNN.

The four names and photos that have appeared in the media are of Abouyaaqoub, Oukabir, Aallaa and Hychami, CNN reported.

 

Police: Stabbings in Finland ‘a terrorist attack’

Police in Finland said they believe the killing of two people in the southwestern city of Turku on Friday was a terrorist attack, the BBC reported Saturday.

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The attacker, who was shot in the leg by police and taken into custody, was an 18-year-old Moroccan. The two people stabbed to death were both Finnish, police said. Eight people were also injured, among them two Swedes and one Italian.

Police raided a flat and made a number of arrests overnight, the BBC reported.

In a statement, police said "The act had been investigated as murder, but during the night we received additional information which indicates that the criminal offences are now terrorist killings."

Police said they knew the identity of the Moroccan but have not yet released it, the BBC reported.

The attack happened in the Puutori/Market Square area of Turku.

Nobel laureate Yousafzai accepted to Oxford

Malala Yousafzai, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 and survived a gunshot wound at age 15 for speaking out for the right to an education, has been accepted to the University of Oxford, the Evening Standard reported.

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The 20-year-old activist shared word of her acceptance to the school on Twitter and included the screenshot of her “Congratulations” notice, CBC News reported. She plans to major in philosophy, politics and economics, the favored degree of many of Britain's top leaders.

"So excited to go to Oxford!!" she tweeted Thursday.

Yousafzai was a co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 for her work in pushing for education for all children. She shared the honor with Indian children's rights activist Kailash Satyarthi. At age 15, Yousafzai was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman in Pakistan as a teenager for speaking out for the right of girls to go to school, a topic she raised publicly as an 11-year-old.

Barcelona van attack: At least 15 killed in terror attack; arrests made 

Authorities said a terror attack in Barcelona claimed at least 15 lives on Thursday and left 80 others injured after a van slammed into pedestrians on Barcelona's popular La Rambla street.

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Mossos d'Esquadra, the Catalonia police force, confirmed the attack in a Twitter post around 5:10 p.m. local time.

Obama's Charlottesville response becomes most-liked tweet of all time

Former President Barack Obama’s response to the deadly, racially charged unrest in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend has become the most popular tweet of all time.

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Obama took to Twitter on Saturday after a rally organized by white supremacist groups turned violent, leaving a 32-year-old woman dead and multiple people injured.

>> Related: Trump condemns KKK, white supremacists days after deadly Charlottesville attack

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion," Obama wrote, quoting late South African President Nelson Mandela in a series of tweets. “People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love … for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite."

By Wednesday morning, the tweet had more than 3.1 million likes, rising above Ariana Grade’s response in May to a deadly bombing at one of her shows in Manchester to become the most-liked tweet of all time. Grande’s tweet, which has more than 2.7 million likes, was previously ranked No. 1, according to Favstar, a company that tracks Twitter usage.

Police arrested James Alex Fields Jr., 20, Saturday after authorities identified him as the suspect accused of slamming into a pair of parked vehicles and running down counterprotesters demonstrating against the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville. The rally was organized to protest the removal of a Confederate memorial from the city’s Emancipation Park.

>> Related: Who is James Alex Fields Jr., suspect in deadly Charlottesville car attack?

The crash claimed the life of Heather Heyer, a Charlottesville resident who was attending the counterprotest with friends.

In the aftermath of the attack, President Donald Trump was roundly criticized for his failure to call out white supremacists for the violence. He instead said that there were “many sides” to blame.

He attempted to mollify critics two days later, saying at a news conference that “racism is evil, and those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything that we hold dear as Americans.”

Russian surveillance plane spotted over Boston

An incredible photo taken Saturday showed a Russian surveillance plane flying over Boston.

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A photographer with The Boston Herald took the photo in South Boston and estimated the plane to be only about 3,600 feet high -- less than a mile above the ground and one-tenth as high as cruising altitude for most commercial flights.

The flight was sanctioned because of what is called the Open Skies Treaty, an international program that allows unarmed aerial surveillance flights over participating nations, Boston25News.com reported.

Russia and the United States are two of the 34 nations in the agreement.

The same Russian plane was spotted over Washington D.C. last week. It has been conducting missions based out of an Air force base in Ohio.

London's Big Ben to go silent for four years

Big Ben, the iconic British timekeeper at the Palace of Westminster, will go silent until 2021.

>> Read more trending news 

Also known as the Great Bell of the clock on the Elizabeth Tower, Big Ben is the name of the bell inside the clocktower. It will sound Monday for the last time for four years.

According to the BBC, the bongs are being disconnected for the clock and the surrounding tower to be restored.

“Big Ben falling silent is a significant milestone in this crucial conservation project. This essential program of works will safeguard the clock on a long term basis, as well as protecting and preserving its home,” Steve Jaggs, keeper of the Great Clock, said in a statement.

Jaggs said the clock will be be “dismantled piece by piece with each cog examined and restored,” The Washington Post reported.

According to CNN, the repairs will cost approximately $40 million. 

The bells chimes have signaled time every hour in the city for 157 years.

The last time the bell was silent was in 2007, when it stopped for maintenance work. Before that, the bong was paused between 1983 and 1985 while it underwent refurbishments.

The bell will still ring for important national events such as New Year's Eve and Remembrance Sunday.

Read more at BBC and The Washington Post.

World's oldest man, Auschwitz survivor dies at 113

Yisrael Kristal, a survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp and recognized last year by Guinness World Records as the world's oldest living man, died in Israel on Friday. He was 113, Reuters reported.

>> Read more trending news

According to Guinness, Kristal was born in Poland on Sept. 15, 1903. At the Auschwitz death camp, his first wife, two children and other family members were killed by the Nazis. He married again after the war and moved to Israel in 1950.

Kristal was awarded a Guinness certificate as the world's oldest man on March 11, 2016, when he was 112 years and 178 days old. He died in Haifa aged 113 years, 330 days, Reuters reported.

Jeanne Calment, a French woman, had the longest confirmed human lifespan, according to Guinness. She died in 1997 at the age of 122.

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