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Canadian rock legend Kenny Shields dies 

Kenny Shields, the lead singer of Canadian classic rock ‘n’ roll band Streetheart, died Friday after cardiac surgery in Winnipeg, CBC News reported. He was 69.

>> Read more trending news

Shields and Streetheart charted during the 1970s and 1980s with hits like “Action,” “Hollywood,” “Here Comes the Night,” and a cover of the Rolling Stones’ “Under My Thumb.”

The group’s last album was 2008’s “The Hits/Anthology.” The band had planned a cross-country tour this year to celebrate its 40th anniversary, but scrapped the plan when Shields became ill earlier this month.

Shields’ wife and daughter were with him when he died around 3 a.m., according to close friend and bandmate Jeff Neill.

“The ones that he loved were by his side and he wasn’t in pain,” Neill told CBC News. “And he just slipped away.”

‘Britain’s Got Talent’ champion dog Pudsey dies

Former “Britain’s Got Talent” winner Ashleigh Butler announced the death of her beloved dog, Pudsey on Friday, ITV reported.

>> Read more trending news

Butler, who won the 2012 season title on the ITV television show with Pudsey -- a mix of border collie, bichon frise and Chinese crested -- posted an emotional tribute on her Instagram account.

“My handsome man is gone and I don’t know what to do without him,” Butler wrote.

Butler said Pudsey, who was 11, was put down on Thursday after a short battle with leukemia. 

"I had to make the hardest decision of my life to let my beautiful boy go to sleep at the age of 11," Butler told the BBC.

The pair were notable for their dance routine to the theme song from “Mission: Impossible,” and were the first dog act to win the competition.

Woman, deputies aid 4 children left in car in Walmart parking lot

A Virginia woman and three sheriff’s deputies helped make four children comfortable, providing them with formula and diapers after they were left alone in a car in a Walmart parking lot, WTVR reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Crystal Richards-Jackson said she noticed three Hanover County deputies making multiple trips to a car parked outside a Walmart in Mechanicsville. Four children -- two 3-year,-olds, a 2-year-old and a 1-month-old infant, had been left untended in the vehicle at 4:30 a.m. Thursday. The temperature was 73 degrees, and deputies said the children had been in the car for more than an hour.

“It was hot,” Richards-Jackson told WTVR. “I mean, I was sweating.”

Deputies said Kiear Ellis, 24, and another woman had left the children inside the car and went into the Walmart, where they were arrested on charges of shoplifting. Neither woman mentioned they had children in a car, WTVR reported.

Ellis is charged with felony grand larceny and three misdemeanor counts of child endangerment. The other woman, whose name has not been released, was charged with one count of petty larceny and one count of child endangerment.

Richards-Jackson called the deputies “angels.”

“They weren’t police,” she said. “They were parents. I saw the officers going back and forth and one officer came back with a bottle.”

Richards-Jackson said she persuaded deputies to allow her to try and find other family members for the children.

"I bought formula and Pampers and the deputy mentioned CPS (Child Protective Services),” she told WTVR. “I asked to see if I could find their family before getting CPS involved, and the deputy agreed."

Richards-Jackson says an aunt and grandmother came to get the children.

Aside from soiled Pampers and underwear, they were all in good shape.

"They (deputies) made sure these kids had food and didn't go hungry," she said.

Your eyes will fry under normal sunglasses during 2017 eclipse, here’s why

The nation is preparing for the Aug. 21 “Great American” total solar eclipse, which is the first in 99 years to cross coast-to-coast.

>> Read more trending news

That means buying special eclipse glasses because normal sunglasses – even those with the darkest lenses – aren’t enough to protect eyes from damaging rays.

It’s not that the sun is any stronger during an eclipse, but where you would squint, blink and turn away from the full sun on a normal day to protect your eyes, it can be more comfortable to look at the sun as the moon moves over the bright disk.

“A solar eclipse should never be watched the same way we should not stare at the sun,” said Alberto Ortiz, an ophthalmologist with Mittleman Eye in West Palm Beach. “It causes toxicity to the retina and can even cause permanent vision loss.”

Damage to the eye may not be immediately noticeable, but can occur later with blurred vision or complete loss of sight, Ortiz said.

>> Related: Best places to see the 2017 solar eclipse.

Rick Fienberg, the press officer for the American Astronomical Society, said ordinary sunglasses transmit 10 to 20 percent of the light that falls on them.

This makes the landscape on a bright sunny day easier to look at without squinting, and cuts down on glare.

Eclipse glasses allow just 0.0001 percent of the light that falls on them through.

“That’s at least 100,000 times darker than ordinary sunglasses,” Fienberg said. “Nothing can get through such glasses except the sun itself – just enough to be comfortable for viewing.”

The only time it’s safe to look at the eclipse is if you are in the path of totality and the fleeting moments when the sun is completely covered by the moon.

About 12 million people live in the path of totality for the Aug. 21 eclipse. Millions more will travel to get into the path.

“The sun can be viewed safely with the naked eye only during the few brief seconds or minutes of a total solar eclipse,” NASA says on its eclipse website. “Do not attempt to observe the partial or annular phases of any eclipse with the naked eye.”

It is only safe to view a solar eclipse with the naked eye when you are in the path of totality and the moon completely covers the sun.

Proper eclipse glasses are marked with ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and the numbers 12312-2.

Some older solar-viewing glasses may meet previous standards for eye protection, but not the new international standard, Fienberg said.

NASA recommends glasses from the companies Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical and TSE 17.

Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, said it’s a good idea to practice putting the glasses on with children before the eclipse.

“Absolutely make sure the eye protection is clearly on top of the eyes of the child,” Zurbuchen said. “It’s not good to look at the sun when it’s just in the sky and it’s not good when it’s only half or three-quarters covered. The only time it’s OK to look at the sun is when it is entirely covered by the moon.”

Hit the decks of Oasis of the Seas for perfect solar eclipse view

Want the perfect spot to view the Aug. 21 total eclipse of the sun?

>> Read more trending news

How about on the deck of a cruise ship, surrounded by miles of ocean!

There’s still time to book the seven-night Total Eclipse Cruise aboard the Oasis of the Seas, sailing from Port Canaveral on Aug. 20.

The party kicks off the following day with eclipse-themed activities, including dance parties, trivia, enrichment lectures and science programs for youngsters. Eclipse-watchers can indulge in a Cosmic Cosmo, Planetary Punch or Moon Pie.

A “major headliner” is slated to perform in concert on Eclipse Day — but the cruise line is keeping us in the dark (eclipse humor) for now as to the identity of the entertainer.

Post-eclipse stops on the voyage are St. Maarten, St. Thomas and Nassau. On-board activities include two Flowrider surf simulators and a nine decks-high zip line. Broadway musical “Cats” is on stage, and the outdoor AquaTheater offers high-diving acrobatic performances.

For more information on the sailing, visit www.RoyalCaribbean.com/TotalEclipse

Great American eclipse: Celestial mechanics or act of God?

Man has always looked to the cosmos for answers, with delight, in fear, and for signs.

In August, the boldest sign the universe can bring — a midday midnight — will be on display for millions of people as a total solar eclipse paints a black ribbon coast-to-coast.

>> Read more trending news

It is mechanical, an alignment predictable to the second, an event ripe for scientific study. Yet, it is also an apparition so profound that historically, and even today, a total solar eclipse is considered by some a signal from a higher power, or a harbinger of apocalypse.

“Total eclipses are so phenomenal and so overpowering and so amazing that some people have ascribed a ‘super spirituality’ to them,” said Dan McGlaun, a 12-time total solar eclipse viewer who runs the website Eclipse2017.org. “That’s why so many cultures have created stories and myths about eclipses throughout history.”

>> Related: South Floridians prepare for total solar eclipse.

The Aug. 21 total solar eclipse is the first in 99 years to cross the U.S., traveling from Oregon to South Carolina. Everyone in North America will be able to see the eclipse, but only those in the 70-mile wide path of totality will witness a black hole open in the daytime sky as the moon envelops the sun.

The cross-country eclipse will take 90 minutes, beginning at 10:15 a.m. PST in Newport, Ore., and ending 4:10 p.m. EST in Charleston, S.C. For two minutes, 40 seconds, darkness will reign in the strip of totality where 12 million people live and millions more will journey.

>> Related: New heat-activated eclipse stamp does something no other stamp can.

In ancient times, mythical animals were often blamed for the darkness, eating the sun bite by bite to starve people of life-giving light. An invisible dragon swallowed the sun in China. India had a serpent head with no body munching on the bright star. Demon dogs did the deed in Scandinavia. The Mayans thought a giant Jaguar was the culprit.

Some Australian aboriginal tribes thought the eclipse was the joining of the moon and sun as man and wife, or the moon (man) pulling the curtains of the sky closed for privacy as they came together.

“That’s really the sweetest one I’ve heard,” said Lika Guhathakurta, NASA’s lead scientist for the eclipse. “Most cultures have regarded eclipses with great trepidation and fear, and you can understand why when all of a sudden darkness descends during the day and you don’t know why.”

>> Related: Best places to see the 2017 solar eclipse.

Guhathakurta said in remote parts of India people hold onto folklore beliefs that food cooked during an eclipse is poison and people bang pots and pans together to frighten away the moon so the sun can shine again. There is also a misconception that solar eclipses can harm pregnant women, who are asked to stay indoors during the event.

As recent as 1995, Guhathakurta said she saw the pots and pans ritual in India. In 1998, she saw the same thing in Mongolia.

“Even in our country, there are all kinds of ideas,” said Guhathakurta.

Find out what they are in the full story at MyPalmBeachPost. 

Florida man pleads for return of wife's ashes stolen in burglary

A Maitland, Florida, man said Friday that he feels like he lost his wife a second time after her ashes were stolen in a home burglary just weeks before a planned trip to Hawaii to spread them on the beach.

>> Read more trending news

Frank Schieber bought his Maitland home with his wife, and “love of my life,” Nancy in December.

Four weeks ago, she died of cancer. But before she did, Nancy asked her husband to take her ashes back to the beach in Hawaii where they celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary.

“In her last few days in hospice, we were chatting with (her and asked), 'Well, what would you like done with your ashes?'” Frank Schieber said. “And she didn’t have a really good idea, and I said, ‘Well, you know, I could take you back to that beach in Hawaii.’ And she just lit up and said, ‘You’d do that for me?’ And I said, 'Yeah, I would.'”

He would have flown to Hawaii with his son Aug. 1, but on Monday, someone broke into Schieber’s home and, among other things, stole a travel bag containing a box with her ashes.

“When I realized the bag was gone, I was running through the house (saying), ‘No, no, no. How could it be gone?’” Schieber said.

Now he worries the burglars may have ditched the box in the trash and it may be gone.

It’s a hard thing to process, Schieber said.

“I can just imagine that once they figured out what it was, after leaving the home, that she’s going to end up in a dumpster or in a ditch, and she deserves much better than that,” he said. “Nothing is like losing the ashes of the person you love and being unable to fulfill her dying wish.”

Schieber didn’t think the burglars knew what they were taking and hoped it wasn’t too late for his wife’s ashes to be returned.

“They’re certainly of no value to anyone but me,” he said. “To understand what it feels like, if your momma had died and you had her body ready for burial and someone took it and threw it in a dumpster, how would you feel? 'Cause that’s how I feel. She didn’t deserve that.

“I just want it back so I can do the right thing and take her where her last wishes wanted me to take her.”

Anyone with information on the location of Nancy Schieber’s ashes is asked to contact the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office.

If the person who took them still has the ashes and wants to return them, no questions asked, they can be dropped off at DeGusipe Funeral Home & Crematory, Frank Schieber said.

The funeral home is located at 9001 N. Orlando Ave., in Maitland.

Great American Eclipse: Economic boon or bust for towns in path?

The tiny town of Herculaneum, Missouri, canceled the Fourth of July this year.

>> Read more trending news

It’s saving its celebrations for the Super Bowl of celestial events — a total solar eclipse that will turn the Mississippi River-hugging burg of 4,000 dark for a full two minutes, 32 seconds on Aug. 21.

Scores of cities from Oregon to South Carolina are planted in the 70-mile-wide path of totality for the historic eclipse. With one month to go, they are watching with wary excitement, bracing for an onslaught of eclipse chasers and hoping for a solar system-sized economic boost.

>> RELATED: Best places to see the Great American Eclipse

“We’re doing a two-day festival prior to the eclipse,” said Herculaneum Mayor Bill Haggard, who is also overseeing the sales of city-stamped eclipse glasses, T-shirts and commemorative coins. “We’ve been working on this for a couple years now trying to get the word out.”

A total solar eclipse last touched the U.S. in 1979, turning day to night along the path of a moon shadow that crossed five states. The Aug. 21 eclipse is the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in 99 years.

For many, it will be a once-in-a-lifetime experience, with hotels filling up more than a year in advance and reservations spilling over into dorms at universities eager to cash in on their location.

But economists doubt a significant economic boon will be felt in most areas.

>> RELATED: Your eyes will fry without special eclipse glasses

Small towns are limited by how many people they can house, feed and entertain. At the same time, unlike a sporting event held in a specific city, the coast-to-coast eclipse spreads out spending with no one town as a focal point.

“Nashville is the largest city in the path and it will see the largest impact because it has the biggest hotel capacity,” said Jeff Humphreys, director of economic forecasting for the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. “A lot of the smaller towns won’t have the infrastructure to accommodate big crowds, so people won’t be spending a ton of money in them.”

Jimmy Kimmel shares update on infant son following heart surgery

A few months ago, Jimmy Kimmel revealed that his newborn son, Billy, was diagnosed with a congenital heart disease. The newborn was found to have a “hole in the wall of the left and right side of his heart.” Kimmel broke down on his show as he described his son going into surgery and described the wait as “the longest three hours of my life.”

May 1, 2017 announcement: 

>> Read more trending news

Fortunately, the operation was a success, and Billy is doing better than ever. Kimmel shared a picture of Billy on Twitter.

>> RELATED: Jimmy Kimmel breaks down reliving story of newborn son’s heart surgery

“Billy is three months old today and doing great,” Kimmel wrote. “Thanks for all your love & support and please remind your Congresspeople that every kid deserves the care Billy got.”

Kimmel’s wife, Molly McNearney, also posted a picture in celebration of Billy turning three months old. From the looks of the big smile on his face, it was almost like he was never sick.

Owl in wheel of plane delays flight out of Portland airport

A flight out of Portland International Airport was delayed last week when flight crew saw a owl in a plane.

KGW reported that a barn owl was in the wheel well of a small PenAir plane.

>> Read more trending news

The plane was at the airport overnight and was stored in an older hanger that typically has owls around it, according to an airline spokesman.

Crew members found the owl during pre-flight checks, according to KGW. They were able to get the owl out of the well and release it in a safe location.

After a 25-minute delay, the flight took off for Eureka, California.

Watch a video of the owl after it was taken out of the plane in the video from KGW below.

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