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2 drivers shot in separate 'random acts of violence,' Atlanta police say

Police are investigating two separate shootings of drivers in the metro Atlanta area overnight.

Atlanta police said one victim was shot in the neck on Fulton Street, then lost control and crashed.

The driver then lost control and hit a line of parked cars in front of an apartment building. The car then flipped on its side.

It also pushed one of those cars up onto a tree and bench.

The victim was able to get out of the wreckage.

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Atlanta police say he was shot in the neck. He survived, but lost a lot of blood.

He gave officers a description of the silver SUV the shooter was in, which matches the same description another driver gave.

That driver was shot multiple times on Interstate 20 from a passing silver SUV a couple of hours earlier and not far away.

Channel 2’s Steve Gehlbach asked police about any other possible connections that could link the shootings, but, so far, they don’t know why each was targeted, possibly by the same person.

2 cars totaled in crash involving Atlanta police officer

An Atlanta police officer is recovering in the hospital after officials said she crashed into a car.

Officials told Channel 2 Action News it happened on Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard and Peeples Street in southwest Atlanta early Thursday morning.

Police didn't say if the call required blue lights and sirens, but the impact totaled both the cruiser and the passenger side of a Kia Soul.

“Her car collided with a citizen vehicle (and) the driver of the vehicle sustained serious injuries,” Capt. Andrew Senzer said.

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The impact knocked down a light pole and deployed the airbags in both cars.

“The officer was complaining (about) injuries to her knees,” Senzer said.

Police called in the Georgia State Patrol to investigate the crash.

Georgia State Patrol said the officer failed to yield at the intersection and the other driver had a green light.

Both the other driver and the officer were taken to Grady Memorial Hospital for treatment. 

2 cars totaled in crash involving Atlanta police officer

An Atlanta police officer is recovering in the hospital after officials said she crashed into a car.

Officials told Channel 2 Action News it happened on Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard and Peeples Street in southwest Atlanta early Thursday morning.

Police didn't say if the call required blue lights and sirens, but the impact totaled both the cruiser and the passenger side of a Kia Soul.

“Her car collided with a citizen vehicle (and) the driver of the vehicle sustained serious injuries,” Capt. Andrew Senzer said.

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The impact knocked down a light pole and deployed the airbags in both cars.

“The officer was complaining (about) injuries to her knees,” Senzer said.

Police called in the Georgia State Patrol to investigate the crash.

Georgia State Patrol said the officer failed to yield at the intersection and the other driver had a green light.

Both the other driver and the officer were taken to Grady Memorial Hospital for treatment. 

Study: Counting calories isn't key to weight loss

It’s often considered common knowledge that in order to lose weight, you should start by reducing your calorie intake.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention even advises individuals trying to lose weight to keep a calorie tracking journal.

But new research finds losing weight is more about diet quality than calorie quantity.

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The findings, published this week in the academic journal JAMA, showed that dieting individuals who reduced their consumption of added sugars, highly processed foods and refined grains while focusing on increasing their vegetables and whole foods, lost significant amounts of weight over the course of a year without counting calories or limiting the size of portions.

"The unique thing is that we didn't ever set a number for them to follow," Dr. Christopher D. Gardner, director of nutrition studies at the Stanford Prevention Research Center and lead researcher, told The New York Times. Instead of putting limits on calorie intake, Gardner said researchers instructed participants to focus on eating as much whole or "real" foods as they needed to avoid feeling hungry.

More than 600 individuals participated in the study, which was backed with $8 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health and other groups.

While the study focused primary on diet, the participants were also given 22 health education classes and were encouraged to meet standard guidelines for physical activity.

Gardner designed the study with fellow researchers to examine how overweight and obese people would compare when consuming low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets. The recruited individuals -- who hailed from northern California -- were split into two groups: "healthy" low-carb and "healthy" low-fat.

Both groups attended courses led by dietitians who instructed them to consume minimally processed and nutrient-rich whole foods. They also encouraged participants to cook at home on a regular basis.

Individuals in the low-fat group were told to eat foods such as brown quinoa, fresh fruit, legumes, rice, barley, steel-cut oats, lentils, lean meats and low-fat dairy products.

Although soft drinks, fruit juice, white rice and white bread may technically be low in fat, participants were told to avoid these, as they are highly processed or contain added sugars.

The low-carb group was advised to eat foods such as avocados, hard cheeses, vegetables, olive oil, salmon, nut butter, and grass-fed and pasture-raised animal foods.

After one year, both groups demonstrated significant weight loss even though they didn't worry about their calorie intake. Those in the low-fat group lost about 11.7 pounds on average, while the members of the low-carb group lost a little more than 13 pounds. Individuals in both groups also showed improvements in other important health markers such as reduced body fat, lower blood sugar, improved blood pressure levels and decreased waist size.

"This is the road map to reducing the obesity epidemic in the United States," Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, a cardiologist and dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, who was not involved in the new study, told The New York Times. "It's time for the U.S. and other national policies to stop focusing on calories and calorie counting."

Beyond calorie counting, the study contradicted the increasingly popular theory that diets should be catered to an individual's genetics. According to U.S. News and World Report, previous research has suggested that certain genes or an individual's insulin levels could interact with different diets to affect weight loss.

This new study showed no significant difference when filtering for such factors. Weight loss among the participants was found to be the same, regardless of genetics, insulin levels or diet type.

"The bottom line: Diet quality is important for both weight control and long-term well-being," Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of the nutrition department at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, told The New York Times.

CLICK HERE to read the new research at jamanetwork.com.

This article was written by Jason Lemon, For The Atlanta Journal Constitution.

College student warning others after she was kidnapped from grocery store

A college student is speaking out and sharing her story to warn others after she was kidnapped from a grocery store parking lot.

Jaila Gladden, a 22-year-old University of West Georgia student, said she went to a Kroger in Carrollton to get some tea one night in September.

Surveillance video shows the moment a suspect approached her, put a knife to her stomach, shoved her into her car and climbed into the driver's seat.

"I was in shock at that moment and I didn't know what to do," Gladden said.

Police said the suspect, identified as Timothy Wilson, 28, drove her an hour away, assaulted her and threatened to kill her for nearly two hours.

"He told me there was no purpose of crying," Gladden said.

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Police said Wilson told Gladden he was driving to Michigan. She said he gave her back her cellphone so she could find a gas station for him to rob. She took that opportunity to try to get help.

"I texted my boyfriend my location immediately and told him I had been kidnapped," Gladden said.

Her boyfriend mapped her location via the phone's tracking system and called police.

A few hours later, Wilson was captured and Gladden was rescued.

Now, Gladden's attorney is demanding answers from Kroger.

"Why wasn't there a security guard in this parking lot?" Rod Dixon said.

Kroger released the following statement:

"We are deeply saddened by the terrible suffering Ms. Gladden endured from these atrocious criminal acts. We extend our sympathy to Mrs. Gladden, her family and friends. We have been and will continue to assist the Atlanta Police Department and Carrollton Police Department in any way we can to help bring this criminal to justice."

Dixon said they plan on filing a lawsuit against Kroger.

Wilson pleaded not guilty to the charges and is being held at the Fulton County Jail.

College student warning others after she was kidnapped from grocery store

A college student is speaking out and sharing her story to warn others after she was kidnapped from a grocery store parking lot.

Jaila Gladden, a 22-year-old University of West Georgia student, said she went to a Kroger in Carrollton to get some tea one night in September.

Surveillance video shows the moment a suspect approached her, put a knife to her stomach, shoved her into her car and climbed into the driver's seat.

"I was in shock at that moment and I didn't know what to do," Gladden said.

Police said the suspect, identified as Timothy Wilson, 28, drove her an hour away, assaulted her and threatened to kill her for nearly two hours.

"He told me there was no purpose of crying," Gladden said.

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Police said Wilson told Gladden he was driving to Michigan. She said he gave her back her cellphone so she could find a gas station for him to rob. She took that opportunity to try to get help.

"I texted my boyfriend my location immediately and told him I had been kidnapped," Gladden said.

Her boyfriend mapped her location via the phone's tracking system and called police.

A few hours later, Wilson was captured and Gladden was rescued.

Now, Gladden's attorney is demanding answers from Kroger.

"Why wasn't there a security guard in this parking lot?" Rod Dixon said.

Kroger released the following statement:

"We are deeply saddened by the terrible suffering Ms. Gladden endured from these atrocious criminal acts. We extend our sympathy to Mrs. Gladden, her family and friends. We have been and will continue to assist the Atlanta Police Department and Carrollton Police Department in any way we can to help bring this criminal to justice."

Dixon said they plan on filing a lawsuit against Kroger.

Wilson pleaded not guilty to the charges and is being held at the Fulton County Jail.

Unpaid student loans could cost you your job under little-known state law

Registered nurse Debra Curry was shocked when she received a letter Nov. 2014 from the Department of Justice notifying her she was violating Georgia law by not paying for a federal education loan, and the board of nursing would suspend her license if she did not pay. 

“I have numerous loans, they’re hard to keep up with,” Curry said. 

Curry pays more than $1,700 a month toward multiple loans, but the DOJ letter was the first time she learned one of her loans was in default. 

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“That’s alarming. It got my attention,” Curry said.

Curry was confronted with what many describe as a little-known law that’s on the books in more than a dozen states. When student borrowers don’t pay back federal loans they risk a lower credit score, garnished wages, and in Georgia, losing their job.

Currently professional licenses through the Secretary of State and the Medical Composite Boards must be suspended if the licensees’ federal student loans are in nonpayment or default. 

“The way this law is written it essentially makes the state of Georgia a collection agency for the federal government,” Republican State Rep. Jason Spencer said.

What you need to know about the law, and the new bill introduced to change it, Thursday on Channel 2 Action News at 5 p.m.

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