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Student Uses Heimlich Maneuver To Save Choking Classmate

Student Uses Heimlich Maneuver To Save Choking Classmate

Macy’s, Kmart, JCPenney: More retailers closing brick-and-mortar stores

The news from retailers across the country this quarter has not been good. 

More than two dozen stores and restaurants, including the likes of Macy's, Payless Shoes, Outback Steakhouse and Noodles and Company, have either closed locations or have announce plans to shutter stores across the country.

As people choose e-commerce over shopping in brick-and-mortar stores, experts said customers can expect to see more deserted storefronts and “going out of business” signs.

"It's going to be a year of transition and a year of reckoning and a year of awakening for retailers," said Marshal Cohen, chief industry analysis for the NPD Group. NPD Group conducts market research on consumer trends.

More shoppers are eschewing retail outlets for the convenience of online shopping, made sweeter with deals from the likes of Amazon, which offers free shipping if you are an Amazon Prime member. 

Amazon has seen the benefits of such features. In the fourth quarter of 2016, the company saw a 22 percent increase in revenue over the fourth quarter of 2015.

U.S. shoppers spent a record high $91.7 billion online during the 2016 holiday season.

While e-commerce is seen as quick and generally easy, a study conducted in 2013 by WD Partners showed that nearly 80 percent of respondents said instant gratification was what got them out of their homes and into the malls. 

Here’s a list of 15 retailers that have announced store closings for 2017.

  • American Apparel – all 110 stores closed
  • CVS – closing 70 stores
  • Chico – closing 120 stores
  • Crocs – closing 160 stores
  • Family Christian – closing all of its 240 stores 
  • JCPenney – closing 138 stores
  • Kmart – closing 108 stores
  • Macy's – closing 63 stores
  • Office Depot – closing 100 stores
  • Payless Shoes – closing 400-500 stores
  • Radio Shack – closing 552 stores
  • Sears – closing 42 stores
  • The Limited – closed 250 stores in January
  • The Children’s Place – closing as many as 200 stores
  • H.H. Gregg – closing 88 stores 

Several restaurant chains have also announced they will be closing locations in 2017 as well.

Forty “underperforming” Carrabba’s, Outback, Bonefish Grill and Flemings restaurants will be closing by the end of the year, according to the company that owns them.

In 2016, chains Bob Evans, Logan’s Roadhouse, Old Country Buffet and Ruby Tuesday all announced restaurant closings.

WATCH: Teen saves choking friend while others stand by

A Wisconsin teenager is alive today thanks to his quick-thinking friend.

>> Read more trending news 

Freshman Will Olson was eating lunch with his friends this week when he started to choke on a piece of food. His classmate Ian Brown immediately knew something was wrong, jumped to his feet and began using the Heimlich Maneuver on Olson.

Other students around them continued eating.

After a few thrusts, the food became dislodged and Olson began to breathe again.

“I could’ve been dead,” Olson told WISN. “I could be dead now. I’m thankful. I can’t say thank you enough for what he did.”

The La Crosse Police Department posted surveillance video of the incident to its Facebook page where it said Brown had learned the life-saving technique when he took a training course with the police department. Brown had participated in the department’s Police Explorer program, which exposes teenagers who are interested in pursuing a career in law enforcement the basics of policing, including first aid training, according to KTRK-TV

Chihuahua Attempts Daring Escape

Chihuahua Attempts Daring Escape

Nearly 1 million pounds of chicken recalled due to ‘metal objects’

An Oklahoma company is recalling nearly 1 million pounds of breaded chicken products sold nationwide after customers complained of finding “metal objects” in the food.

>> Read more trending news

About 933,300 pounds of OK Food Inc. breaded chicken products fall under the recall, according to a notice issued Thursday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The chicken was sold under various brand names, including Wal-Mart’s Great Value store brand. The products were also sold to institutions across the country.

 >> See the full list of recalled OK Food Inc. chicken products

The affected chicken products have establishment No. P-7092 in the USDA mark of inspection.

The recall comes after five people complained of finding metal in OK Food Inc.’s chicken. Personnel with the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service also found metal in the products.

OK Food Inc. determined that the food was tainted by metal from a conveyor belt.

No injuries or illnesses have been reported.

Man, 72, suffocates wife, drags body to car in broad daylight, police say

A Texas man was arrested and charged with murder after police responded to a call about a man seen dragging a body from a house to a car in broad daylight, police said. 

When police arrived to the home inside a gated community, they saw Joseph Scala, 72, leaning against a vehicle, and the body of his wife Betty Scala, 72, on the ground next to it around 11 a.m. Thursday, according to WFAA.

Scala told officers he suffocated his wife, Sgt. Chris Brichetto, a Granbury police spokesman, told the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram

>> Read more trending news

"She was laying next to the vehicle. He was kind of trying to catch his breath,” Brichetto told KDFW. “That is what was reported to me. They asked what happened. He said, ‘I suffocated her.’”

The couple lived in Arlington, but Betty was staying with a friend in Granbury. Joseph Scale did not give a reason for or say what lead up to the incident, Brichetto said.

“She was staying out here with a friend. He was not,” Brichetto said. “So he drove out here today, apparently for that reason."

83-Year-Old Allegedly Steals Ambulance and Drives Home

83-Year-Old Allegedly Steals Ambulance and Drives Home

Insurers May Notch Bigger Profits From Fewer Customers In ‘Trumpcare’

The House GOP’s embattled health care bill has plenty of detractors: Democrats, hospitals, the American Medical Association and the House Freedom Caucus all oppose it. But the insurance industry is not on that list — even though it stands to lose millions of customers.

One reason the industry has been hanging back: Insurers’ profits are expected to fatten under the bill.

The House Republicans’ replacement plan would likely attract more younger, healthier consumers to the individual market than the Affordable Care Act did, according to Standard & Poor’s, the corporate credit rating firm. The ACA tilted the opposite way, offering more options for older, sicker Americans whose health care claims eroded insurers’ profits.

“Profitability will likely improve, as the replacement plan can result in an improved risk pool in the individual market,” S&P said in a report on the House leadership’s initial plan.

A vote on the GOP “Trumpcare” bill is expected Friday, but by late Thursday it remained unclear whether there were enough votes to pass it. The Trump administration has said if the measure doesn’t pass Friday, it will abandon the effort to replace Obamacare.

Under the current health law, an insurer is allowed to charge a 64-year-old consumer a premium that’s three times what it charges a 21-year-old. The House bill allows insurers to charge older consumers premiums that are five times higher.

That change would reduce premiums for younger consumers but boost them significantly for people in their 50s and 60s – even with tax credits that increase for older people under the GOP plan.

Not all insurers are enthusiastic about what’s in the House bill. Those that are also mainly in the business of managing Medicaid services to enrollees under contract with states — such as Molina Healthcare — oppose the bill because of the expected sharp reductions in Medicaid if the House measure is enacted.

In a new analysis of the House bill that was released Thursday, the Congressional Budget Office predicted 9 million people would fall off Medicaid rolls by 2020 and 14 million by 2026. Overall, 52 million Americans under 65 would be uninsured by 2026 compared with 28 million that year under current law, the CBO said.

America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), which has expressed concerns about the bill but hasn’t taken a formal position for or against the bill, has said the legislation’s provisions would give short-term relief to insurers that have been mostly losing money since the exchanges started in 2014.

Those include giving states $100 billion over 10 years to start high-risk pools and stabilization funds to help insurers deal with higher-risk customers.

One of the most significant positives for insurers in the GOP bill is the elimination of a tax that all insurers paid under the ACA. The industry paid $8 billion in 2014 and is expected to pay $14.3 billion in 2018. Congress temporarily suspended the fee for this year.

Insurers’ opposition to the tax was one of the main reasons why the insurance industry chose not to support the ACA when it was approved in 2010. However, the insurance industry built support for the law by throwing its weight behind a requirement preventing insurers from refusing coverage to consumers with preexisting conditions in exchange for a mandate that most Americans have health coverage.

Although many conservative Republicans favor ending the individual mandate, the GOP bill as originally proposed would instead require that Americans keep continuous health coverage or pay a 30 percent penalty when they do buy private coverage.

Many of the nation’s largest insurers, such as UnitedHealthcare, Cigna and Aetna, were never large players in the health law’s exchanges or they have pulled out citing steep financial losses. For them, the elimination of the health insurer tax makes the GOP bill look appealing, said Ana Gupte, a health analyst with Leerink, an investment bank. “The GOP bill is a net positive” for those insurers, she said.

Even insurers with many customers on ACA policies now will be better off financially in the GOP bill, Gupte said. “They will make a bigger [profit] margin on a smaller number of people,” she said.

Anthem, a larger player in the Obamacare marketplaces, has said the GOP bill would benefit insurers and individuals by ensuring that remaining insurers stay in the market to provide choices for consumers.

Health insurers’ cautious optimism about the bill contrasts with the rest of the health industry. Lobbying groups representing doctors, hospitals and nurses have objected vehemently to the legislation. AHIP spokeswoman Kristine Grow said the group remains concerned about the long term stability of the Medicaid health plan market because the GOP bill would kill the Medicaid expansion and reduce federal Medicaid funding to states. She also said it’s too early to know how insurers’ 2018 premiums would be affected under the GOP bill.

A big uncertainty for insurers is whether the Trump administration will continue to allow a key program under Obamacare that helps low-income individuals with out-of-pocket health costs. House Republicans suspended a lawsuit that claimed the $7 billion federal funding of the program was illegal.

The program’s future is of concern to Dr. J. Mario Molina, CEO of Molina Healthcare, which has 3 million Medicaid members and nearly 1 million customers on Obamacare exchange plans. The Long Beach, Calif.-based company operates in about a dozen states.

But Molina said his biggest concern is the GOP bill will return the country to the broken individual market system in place before 2014. “The main thing I am worried about is this bill will cause millions of people to lose insurance coverage,” he said.

Regardless of what Congress and the Trump administration decide to do with Medicaid’s federal funding, Molina predicted more states will shift Medicaid recipients into managed care plans to control costs. “In the short term, we will still grow,” he said.

Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a national health policy news service. It is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Man Steals From Woman With Disability & Spends $9,000 At Strip Club

Man Steals From Woman With Disability & Spends $9,000 At Strip Club

Assisted Living Worker Arrested For Filming Couple

Assisted Living Worker Arrested For Filming Couple
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