Now Playing
B985 FM
Last Song Played
80s 90s & NOW
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
B985 FM
Last Song Played
80s 90s & NOW

news

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >

Florida woman pulls gun, uses racial slur in road rage incident

Florida authorities have charged a 22-year-old woman in a road rage incident earlier this month.

Savanah Huffman is accused of pulling out a gun, pointing it at another driver in traffic and using a racial slur to tell the other driver she would kill her, according to Palm Beach County deputies.

>> Read more trending news

On Sept. 13, Huffman was driving in suburban West Palm Beach, when she allegedly pulled out a gun and pointed it at the driver of a Toyota Tacoma. The driver of the truck, a 52-year-old woman, later told investigators she had no idea why the woman pulled the gun out and pointed it or said she would kill her, using a racial slur.

According to the report, Huffman admitted to the road rage incident but gave no reason for singling out the woman.

Another driver who witnessed the incident called 911 and followed Huffman to her house to get her tag number.

When deputies arrived at the home, Huffman let deputies search her vehicle. Inside, they found an unloaded 9 mm pistol under the passenger seat, according to the report.

>> Related: 18-wheeler and SUV caught on camera in road-rage incident

Huffman was arrested on charges of of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and improper exhibition of a firearm.

She was jailed in Palm Beach County and later released on $15,000 bond.

Police blame drunk driver in accident that knocked out power

DECATUR, Ga. (AP) - Power was knocked out to two college campuses and a high school in DeKalb County when a mini-van flipped and hit a utility pole.

WSB-TV reports that the Monday morning crash happened in front of Georgia Piedmont Technical College.

Police say a high school student was driving drunk when it happened.

Electrical wires trapped the driver in the car, and the roadway was shut down for hours as crews worked to clear the scene and get the driver out safely.

___

Information from: WSB-AM, http://wsbradio.com/

Body found in backyard of Cobb County home ID'd as missing woman

Police have identified the woman whose body was found in the backyard of a Cobb County home over the weekend.

Channel 2 Action News has learned the victim, 38-year-old Melissa Fisher, was reported missing the same day her body was found.

The circumstances surrounding Fisher’s death remain under investigation. 

Police tell Channel 2 Action News that there were no obvious signs of foul play, and “it is believed that recent drug usage may have contributed to her death.”

Neighbors talk about their subdivision being turned into a crime scene, plus the latest developments on the investigation, on Channel 2 Action News at 4 p.m.  

Steelers fans burn memorabilia over national anthem stance

The Pittsburgh Steelers didn’t take to the field Sunday as the national anthem played before the team faced the Chicago Bears, and that decision isn’t sitting well with some fans.

>> Read more trending news

Steelers fans across America posted videos on social media showing them burning their memorabilia after the team failed to show up for the anthem. The protest comes amid tension between NFL players, who first started taking a knee during the anthem last year in protest of inequality and police violence, and President Donald Trump, who called the protests disrespectful.

>> Related: Trump slams NFL players for national anthem protests, athletes react

Jim Heaney, a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, posted on YouTube and said, “Can't come out and stand for our anthem or flag? I'm done with you. #BoycottPittsburghSteelers #BoycottTheNFL.”

6 ways you might be disrespecting the flag without even knowing it

How and when the U.S. flag and national anthem should be publicly respected and honored has become the matter of much debate and consternation, but what does the law say?

>> Read more trending news

It’s actually easier than you think to disrespect the Star-Spangled Banner, at least according the sometimes-obscure U.S. Flag Code.

The rules went into effect on the very first Flag Day — June 14, 1923 — but fell out of the spotlight until recently. Title 36, Chapter 10 of the United States Code, listed as “Patriotic Customs,” is quite specific and straightforward when it comes to what you should and should not do with the flag and during the national anthem, including what “respecting the flag” entails.

Most Americans know by heart at least a few of the 11 “respect for the flag” rules listed under Section 176. Never letting the flag touch the ground or water and only displaying the stars and stripes upside-down as a serious distress signal qualify as fairly common knowledge. But who knew about the part of the law that says the flag should never be used to cover the ceiling?

Here are some common ways the flag is disrespected every day, according to the federal code:

1.

“The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery.” So that’s going to be a no to American flag bikinis, bedspreads and curtains.

2.

“The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever.” The law is the law, even for iconic American brands.

3.

“It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for temporary use and discard.” Fourth of July picnics can be just as delicious without the star-spangled napkins and paper plates.

4.

“No part of the flag should ever be used as a costume or athletic uniform. However, a flag patch may be affixed to the uniform of military personnel, firemen, policemen and members of patriotic organizations. The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing. Therefore, the lapel flag pin being a replica, should be worn on the left lapel near the heart.” It would seem even well-intended patriotism can put sports teams on the wrong side of the law.

5.

“It is the universal custom to display the flag only from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs in the open. However, when a patriotic effect is desired, the flag may be displayed 24 hours a day if properly illuminated during the hours of darkness. The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather is inclement, except when an all-weather flag is displayed.”

6.

Incidentally, the law is also pretty straightforward when it comes to what’s expected of Americans when the national anthem is played, given that the anthem is typically accompanied by a display of the flag. If the flag is being displayed, “all present except those in uniform should stand at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart,” and those not in uniform should remove their hats, holding them at the left shoulder, which would put your hand over your heart. Those in uniform salute the flag for the entire song. If there’s no flag on display, everyone is supposed to face wherever the music is coming from and conduct themselves as if the flag is on display there. Kneeling, sitting or otherwise sitting out the anthem is not addressed in the law as illegal or otherwise.

State To Pay $550,000 To Prison Inmate Because Of Amputation

State To Pay $550,000 To Prison Inmate Because Of Amputation

Here’s the truth on whether NFL rules require players to stand for the national anthem

After Donald Trump inserted himself into the national anthem protest debate, there’s been plenty of conversation on whether teams were breaking NFL rules by protesting.

>> Read more trending news

Here’s what is currently circulating on Facebook and other platforms.

“The specific rule pertaining to the national anthem is found on pages A62-63 of the NFL League Rulebook. It states:“The national anthem must be played prior to every NFL game, and all players must be on the sideline for the national anthem.

“During the national anthem, players on the field and bench area should stand at attention, face the flag, hold helmets in their left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in good condition…

…It should be pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged by the public in this area of respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by the start of the national anthem may result in discipline, such as fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first offenses.”

>> Related: Live updates: Trump slams NFL players for national anthem protests, athletes react

Here’s what the 2017 official NFL rulebook says.

As for being on the field ahead of the start of the game, there’s no mention of the national anthem or requirement to stand for it. There is a requirement for teams to be on the field 10 minutes prior to the kickoff. That means teams that stayed in the locker room Sunday, typically had ample time to make their way to the field.

“SECTION 2 STARTING A PERIOD OR HALF

ARTICLE 1. KICKOFF ON SCHEDULE. Both teams must be on the field to kick off at the scheduled time for the start of each half. Prior to the start of the game, both teams are required to appear on the field at least 10 minutes prior to the scheduled kickoff in order to ensure sufficient time for proper warm-up. Designated members of the officiating crew must notify both head coaches personally of the scheduled time for kickoff prior to the start of each half.”

Here is the only real policy on political statements and NFL standards, via the official rulebook.

>> Related: Roger Goodell calls Trump’s attack on NFL players’ protests ‘divisive’

“SECTION 4 EQUIPMENT, UNIFORMS, PLAYER APPEARANCE

ARTICLE 8. PERSONAL MESSAGES. Throughout the period on game-day that a player is visible to the stadium and television audience (including in pregame warm-ups, in the bench area, and during postgame interviews in the locker room or on the field), players are prohibited from wearing, displaying, or otherwise conveying personal messages either in writing or illustration, unless such message has been approved in advance by the League office. Items to celebrate anniversaries or memorable events, or to honor or commemorate individuals, such as helmet decals, and arm bands and jersey patches on players’ uniforms, are prohibited unless approved in advance by the League office. All such items approved by the League office, if any, must relate to team or League events or personages. The League will not grant permission for any club or player to wear, display, or otherwise convey messages, through helmet decals, arm bands, jersey patches, or other items affixed to game uniforms or equipment, which relate to political activities or causes, other non-football events, causes or campaigns, or charitable causes or campaigns. Further, any such approved items must be modest in size, tasteful, non-commercial, and non- controversial; must not be worn for more than one football season; and if approved for use by a specific team, must not be worn by players on other teams in the League.”

>> Related: WWII veteran, 97, kneels in support of NFL’s national anthem protests

So that means the players who wore “I’m with Kap” shirts could have broken NFL rules if the league did not approve them ahead of time. 

>> Related: NASCAR owners threaten to fire those who protest during national anthem

The league could have also taken action at kneeling during the anthem as a form of protest if it deemed it conveying a personal message through illustration. It’s quite clear that the NFL won’t do so at this time.

Jared Kushner used personal email to conduct White House business, lawyer says

Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and a senior White House adviser, used a personal email account to discuss official government business, despite his father-in-law’s criticism of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for doing the same, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

The email account was set up in December, Politico reported, noting that Kushner also uses an official White House email account. The news site was the first to report on Kushner’s use of private email.

“Fewer than 100 emails from January through August were either sent to or returned by Mr. Kushner to colleagues in the White House from his personal email account,” Kushner’s lawyer, Abbe Lowell, said Sunday in a statement to Politico. “These usually forwarded news articles or political commentary and most often occurred when someone initiated the exchange by sending an email to his personal rather than his White House address.”

Trump, who faced Clinton last year in the race for the White House, criticized the former secretary of state numerous times for her use of private email, leading supporters on chants of “Lock her up” and insisting that her actions were illegal. The FBI determined last year that Clinton did not break the law, although then-FBI Director James Comey said that Clinton and her colleagues were "extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information.”

Politico reported that there were no indications that Kushner used his private email account to discuss sensitive or classified information.

An unidentified government official told The New York Times that “unlike in the Clinton case, Mr. Kushner had not set up a private server to house the personal email account. While Mrs. Clinton used her personal account exclusively, the official said that Mr. Kushner does use his government account.”

At a news briefing on Monday, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that, to her knowledge, Kushner’s use of private email was “very limited.”

“White House counsel has instructed all White House staff to use their government email for government matters,” she said, adding that staff was “instructed on this one pretty regularly.”

Government officials are required to keep records of their correspondence under federal law. Lowell told the Times that all White House-related emails were forwarded to Kusner’s official government address in order to create a record of the correspondence.

Lone Steelers player to stand for anthem now has NFL's best-selling jersey

Pittsburgh Steelers offensive lineman Alejandro Villanueva made headlines Sunday afternoon when he was the only member of the Pittsburgh Steelers to stand on the field for the national anthem.

Since that moment, the lineman now has the best-selling jersey in the NFL.

Villanueva, a former Army Ranger who earned a Bronze Star and served three tours in Afghanistan, was the only Steelers player who came outside the tunnel during the national anthem Sunday afternoon.

Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin previously said the team collectively decided not to be on the sideline during the song.

Pictures and video of the 29-year-old West Point graduate standing alone, with his hand on his heart, quickly spread across social media.

According to ESPN, a spokesman for Fanatics, confirmed that over the past 24 hours, Villanueva's gear has been ordered more than that of any other NFL player.

Officials with Fanatics, which runs the NFL’s official online store, said the gear includes jerseys and name T-shirts.

The offensive lineman beat out four quarterbacks for the top spot: Tom Brady, Carson Wentz, Dak Prescott and Aaron Rodgers.

Villanueva jerseys are available in men’s and women’s sizes.

ESPN's Darren Rovell said this is the first time he can remember seeing an offensive lineman's jersey available in women's sizes.

Jerseys and T-shirts of Alejandro Villanueva are now available in men's & women's cuts. First time I've seen that for an offensive lineman pic.twitter.com/EIfozzLdEE — Darren Rovell (@darrenrovell) September 25, 2017