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Missing Washington, D.C., teens: What to know

On March 24, a surge of photos posted by everyday people and celebrities such as Taraji P. Henson and LL Cool J on social media show images with text claiming that 14 girls have disappeared in the last 24 hours in Washington, D.C., and the images have continued to pick up steam.  

>> Read more trending news

WRC reported however, that the information in those images is not entirely true.

Here are things to know about the missing teens in Washington:

Police say that 14 teen girls have not disappeared from Washington in one day.

The girls pictured in the viral image went missing at different times. Relisha Tenau Rudd, pictured on the far left of the image, was last seen in Washington on March 1, 2014. Pheonix Coldon was last seen December 18, 2011 in St. Louis. Shaniah Boyd was last seen in Washington. Makayla Randall, pictured on the far right, has been missing since October 1, 2012 and was last seen in Oak Park, Missouri.

WRC reported that police have changed their method of communicating information about missing persons. There has been no increase in the number of missing people. 

The Metropolitan Police Department has changed how it shares information on missing persons.

“We've just been posting them on social media more often,” Metropolitan Police Department spokeswoman Rachel Reid said.

Chanel Dickerson, commander of the Washington police’s Youth and Family Services Division, told The Washington Post that the 211 people reported missing in January reflected  better reporting by families, not an increase in missing teens.

Many of the missing teens are black or Latino.

Outrage over the missing persons comes from a perception that people of color who are missing are not covered in the media as often as white missing persons.

Derrica Wilson, the co-founder and chief executive of the Black and Missing Foundation, which works to raise awareness of missing people of color, told The Huffington Post 40 percent of missing persons in the U.S. are people of color.

Police say there is not a known link between the missing persons and human trafficking.

Police spokeswoman Karimah Bilal told WRC the teens reported missing so far in 2017 left voluntarily. WUSA reported that since many teens left on their own, Amber Alerts have not been issued for them.

“Because of the number of releases, there have been concerns that young girls in the District of Columbia are victims of human trafficking or have been kidnapped,” Bilal said.

“We look at every case closely to make sure that doesn't happen, but to my knowledge, that hasn't been a factor in any of our missing person cases,” Bilal said. 

Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser and Washington police told WUSA they confirmed that there is no link between the missing persons and human trafficking.

Lawmakers are calling on the FBI to investigate many of the missing persons cases.

The Associated Press reported that Congressional Black Caucus chairman Cedric Richmond, D-La., and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, who represents the District of Columbia in Congress, sent a letter Tuesday that called for Attorney General Jeff Sessions and FBI Director James Comey to devote time to investigating the number of missing children in Washington and “determine whether these developments are an anomaly or whether they are indicative of an underlying trend that must be addressed.”

"Ten children of color went missing in our nation's capital in a period of two weeks and at first garnered very little media attention. That's deeply disturbing," the letter sent to the Justice Department said.

The number of missing persons in Washington changes daily.

The Metropolitan Police Department reports the number of open and closed missing person cases and has them broken down by year, critical and non-critical, and juvenile and adult. Recent data from the department shows a decrease in reported missing person cases from 2,433 in 2015 to 2,242 in 2016.

The regularly updated list of missing persons, including flyers of missing persons, are on the Metropolitan Police Department website

1 dead after plane crashes into home in Georgia

One person has died after a plane crashed into a home in a Marietta, Georgia, neighborhood Friday evening.

The Federal Aviation Administration said a Cessna Citation I aircraft en route to the Fulton County Airport went down around 7:20 p.m.

The pilot was the only person on the plane and died in the crash.

Cobb County fire officials said the plane left from Wilmington, Delaware.

Fire officials said the plane landed in the home's front yard and sent the house up in flames. 

>> Read more trending news

"From what it looks like at this point, it came over from the top of the house and landed in the front yard," Danell Boyd with the Cobb County fire department said. 

The family was at church at the time of the crash and not at home. 

Witnesses said the plan spun out and nose-dived to the ground.

"I heard a swoosh and then a clap and an explosion and I pretty much knew before I looked outside that it was a plane crash," neighbor Joe Thomas said.

A few homes were evacuated while firefighters investigated. The neighborhood will be blocked off for a time as National Transportation Safety Board investigators look into the crash. 

"Seeing a plane on fire and a house starting to burn and wondering if your neighbors are OK -- it's not just something you hear on the news," neighbor Samantha Strickland said.

The FAA will investigate and the NTSB will determine the cause of the crash.

 

Mother with cancer dies a day after delivering twins

A Fresno, California, mother died a day after welcoming newborn twins.

KGO-TV reported that Jamie Snider, 30, had been diagnosed with cervical cancer for the second time. She discovered the cancer returned when she learned she was pregnant.

>> Read more trending news

Throughout her pregnancy, Snider underwent intensive treatment that included chemotherapy.

“They couldn't give her too much chemo because it would affect the development of the babies,” Snider’s brother, Chris Snider, told KGO-TV.

Snider gave birth to twins Nico and Camilla on March 16 via cesarean section. Right after, she underwent surgery for a hysterectomy.

She died of heart failure a day after her surgery, on March 17.

“She made sure those babies would live,” her brother said. “She traded her life."

“What gives me peace in my heart is she got to see those babies and hold them, and be with them a little bit,” Snider's friend, Larina Campanile, told KGO-TV.

In addition to Camilla and Nico, Snider is survived by two older children, Aubrey and Maddie.

KGO-TV reported that three GoFundMe pages have been created to help Snider’s children and help with memorial costs.

Campanile set up a GoFundMe page for her friend to help the family with “any costs necessary in helping through this difficult time,” according to the page. It has surpassed its $6,000 goal.

Another GoFundMe page was created by Vanillape Crude. According to that page, the funds raised will help Jamie Snider’s partner and the twins’ father, Heath Coigny, with costs to care for the children. Coigny’s sister, Willow Coigny, and her husband, Kevin Smith, will be taking the family into their Pelham, New Hampshire, home. More than $36,000 of the page’s $80,000 goal has been raised. 

A third GoFundMe page was created to help with memorial costs. It has surpassed its $4,000 goal.

Snider’s memorial service will be held March 30 in Palo Alto, California. 

President Trump says he'd bargain with Dems on health care

President Donald Trump says his health care reform fell short because it lacked support from Democrats.

Trump made his first comments about the failure of a signature legislative item Friday in the Oval Office a short time after a House vote on the bill was cancelled.

Trump told reporters "we were very close" and tried to blame Democrats, though Republicans control both the House and the Senate.

Pres. Trump after health care bill is pulled: “We were very close...the best thing we can do politically speaking is let Obamacare explode." pic.twitter.com/ppEFrf9IQu— ABC News (@ABC) March 24, 2017

Trump says he would be willing to reopen negotiations for a health care bill with Democrats if the Affordable Care Act fails.

Trump told reporters Friday that he would be "open to it" if Democrats wanted to work on a bipartisan measure. He predicted the current law would soon collapse.

The president says he has a great relationship with the Republican Party and isn't going to speak badly about GOP lawmakers.

Pres. Trump on Obamacare: "I'd love to see it do well but it can't...I want great health care for the people of this nation." pic.twitter.com/t5bR4BHwoK— ABC News (@ABC) March 24, 2017

Still, he said he was a little surprised by the bill's rejection from the conservatives in the House Freedom Caucus.

Trump also said he "never said repeal and replace it within 64 days," though he repeatedly promised during the campaign to do it on Day One of his term.

"We came really close today, but we came up short'," House Speaker Paul Ryan said.

Speaker Ryan: “We were on the cusp of achieving an ambition that we've all had for 7 years and we came a little short. We were close." pic.twitter.com/o8vzsmi582— ABC News (@ABC) March 24, 2017

The president has “left everything on the field when it comes to this bill,” White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Friday at an afternoon press briefing, adding that Ryan "has done everything he can” to collect votes but “at the end of the day, you can’t force people to vote.”

ABC and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

8-week-old boy found strapped to car seat in parking lot; parents arrested

A Texas couple was charged with child endangerment Thursday after a woman told Harris County sheriff’s deputies that she found their 8-week-old child in the middle of a parking lot, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

A woman called police Tuesday night after finding the baby boy strapped to a car seat in a parking space in a Katy strip mall, the Houston Chronicle reported.

The child was cold and fussy by the time the woman who called police, Dee Griffin-Stevens, found him, according to KHOU.

“I just pictured my own children when they were that little,” she told the news station. “I call him ‘baby love,’ because I don’t know his name and probably won’t ever know his name, but I loved him and took care of him.”

Authorities estimated that the child was left for at least 45 minutes before he was found.

An employee at a nearby pizzeria recognized the infant and called his parents, according to KHOU. 

Deputies arrested Sarah Shibley, 33, and Gary Collins, 39, on charges of child endangerment.

“Shibley, who works at the pizzeria, said she left the child in the parking lot where she works and thought his father placed him in a car,” KHOU reported.

Shilbey was released on $2,000 bond, according to the Chronicle. Collins remained jailed Friday.

Amy Schumer drops out of live-action ‘Barbie’ movie

According to a new report from Variety magazine, actress and comedian Amy Schumer will not appear in the live-action “Barbie” film, as previously planned. 

>> Read more trending news

News that Schumer would star in the production was announced in December

This week, Schumer announced that she would no longer be able to participate in the production due to scheduling issues. 

“Sadly, I’m no longer able to commit to ‘Barbie’ due to scheduling conflicts,” the actress said in a statement to Variety. “The film has so much promise, and Sony and Mattel have been great partners. I’m bummed, but look forward to seeing ‘Barbie’ on the big screen.”

“We respect and support Amy’s decision,” a spokesperson for Sony said in a statement. “We look forward to bringing Barbie to the world and sharing updates on casting and filmmakers soon.”

Sony will more than likely have to stick with the previously planned June 29, 2018 release date since Mattel has already produced merchandise and plans with that date in mind. 

According to IMDb, the film is about a doll who sets off on an adventure in the real world after being expelled from ‘Barbieland’ for not being perfect enough.

Sony is still seeking a director for the comedy.

Nearly 1 Million Pounds Of Chicken Recalled Due To ‘Metal Objects’

Nearly 1 Million Pounds Of Chicken Recalled Due To ‘Metal Objects’

House Leaders ‘Came Up Short’ In Effort To Kill Obamacare

Despite days of intense negotiations and last-minute concessions to win over wavering GOP conservatives and moderates, House Republican leaders Friday failed to secure enough support to pass their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

House Speaker Paul Ryan pulled the bill from consideration after he rushed to the White House to tell President Donald Trump that there weren’t the 216 votes necessary for passage.

“We came really close today, but we came up short,” he told reporters at a hastily called news conference.

When pressed about what happens to the federal health law, he added, “We’re going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future.”

Ryan originally had hoped to hold a floor vote on the measure Thursday — timed to coincide with the seventh anniversary of the ACA — but decided to delay that effort because GOP leaders didn’t have enough “yes” votes. The House had been in session Friday while members debated parts of the bill.

The legislation was damaged by a variety of issues raised by competing factions of the party. Many members were spooked by reports by the Congressional Budget Office showing that the bill would lead eventually to 24 million people losing insurance, while some moderate Republicans worried that ending the ACA’s Medicaid expansion would hurt low-income Americans.

At the same time, conservatives, especially the hard-right House Freedom Caucus that often has needled party leaders, complained that the bill kept too much of the ACA structure in place. They wanted a straight repeal of Obamacare, but party leaders said that couldn’t pass the Senate, where Republicans don’t have enough votes to stop a filibuster. So they chose to use a complicated legislative strategy called budget reconciliation that would allow them to repeal only parts of the ACA that affect federal spending.

The decision came after a chaotic week of negotiations, as party leaders sought to woo more conservatives. Trump personally lobbied 120 members through personal meetings or phone calls, according to a count provided Friday by his spokesman, Sean Spicer. “The president and the team here have left everything on the field,” Spicer said.

On Thursday evening, Trump dispatched Office of Management and Development Director Mick Mulvaney to tell his former House GOP colleagues that the president wanted a vote on Friday. It was time to move on to other priorities, including tax reform, he told House Republicans.

“He said the president needs this, the president has said he wants a vote tomorrow, up or down. If for any reason it goes down, we’re just going to move forward with additional parts of his agenda. This is our moment in time,” Rep. Chris Collins (R-N.Y.), a loyal Trump ally, told reporters late Thursday. “If it doesn’t pass, we’re moving beyond health care. … We are done negotiating.”

Trump’s edict clearly irked some lawmakers, including the Freedom Caucus chairman, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C), whose group of more than two dozen members represented the strongest bloc against the measure.

“Anytime you don’t have 216 votes, negotiations are not totally over,” he told reporters who had surrounded him in a Capitol basement hallway as he headed in to the party’s caucus meeting.

Shortly before Ryan’s press conference, Trump called Washington Post reporter Robert Costa to say they were pulling the bill back from consideration. Costa said the president seemed at ease with the decision and did not blame Ryan for the defeat.

Trump, Ryan and other GOP lawmakers tweaked their initial package in a variety of ways to win over both conservatives and moderates. But every time one change was made to win votes in one camp, it repelled support in another.

The White House on Thursday accepted conservatives’ demands that the legislation strip federal guarantees of essential health benefits in insurance policies. But that was another problem for moderates, and Democrats suggested the provision would not survive in the Senate.

Republican moderates in the House — as well as the Senate — objected to the bill’s provisions that would shift Medicaid from an open-ended entitlement to a set amount of funding for states that would also give governors and state lawmakers more flexibility over the program. Moderates also were concerned that the package’s tax credits would not be generous enough to help older Americans — who could be charged five times more for coverage than their younger counterparts — afford coverage.

The House package also lost the support of key GOP allies, including the Club for Growth and Heritage Action. Physician, patient and hospital groups also opposed it.

It’s not clear what will happen next to the Republican effort to overturn or modify Obamacare. But White House officials told members Thursday that if they couldn’t pass the legislation, the president wanted to turn to other priorities, including tax reform. “The president understands this is it,” Spicer said. “We had this opportunity to — to change the trajectory of health care, to help improve — put a health care system in place and to end the nightmare that Republicans have campaigned on called Obamacare.”

Not A Done Deal: House Leaders ‘Came Up Short’ In Effort To Kill Obamacare

Despite days of intense negotiations and last-minute concessions to win over wavering GOP conservatives and moderates, House Republican leaders Friday failed to secure enough support to pass their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

House Speaker Paul Ryan pulled the bill from consideration after he rushed to the White House to tell President Donald Trump that there weren’t the 216 votes necessary for passage.

“We came really close today, but we came up short,” he told reporters at a hastily called news conference.

When pressed about what happens to the federal health law, he added, “We’re going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future.”

Ryan originally had hoped to hold a floor vote on the measure Thursday — timed to coincide with the seventh anniversary of the ACA — but decided to delay that effort because GOP leaders didn’t have enough “yes” votes. The House had been in session Friday while members debated parts of the bill.

The legislation was damaged by a variety of issues raised by competing factions of the party. Many members were spooked by reports by the Congressional Budget Office showing that the bill would lead eventually to 24 million people losing insurance, while some moderate Republicans worried that ending the ACA’s Medicaid expansion would hurt low-income Americans.

At the same time, conservatives, especially the hard-right House Freedom Caucus that often has needled party leaders, complained that the bill kept too much of the ACA structure in place. They wanted a straight repeal of Obamacare, but party leaders said that couldn’t pass the Senate, where Republicans don’t have enough votes to stop a filibuster. So they chose to use a complicated legislative strategy called budget reconciliation that would allow them to repeal only parts of the ACA that affect federal spending.

The decision came after a chaotic week of negotiations, as party leaders sought to woo more conservatives. Trump personally lobbied 120 members through personal meetings or phone calls, according to a count provided Friday by his spokesman, Sean Spicer. “The president and the team here have left everything on the field,” Spicer said.

On Thursday evening, Trump dispatched Office of Management and Development Director Mick Mulvaney to tell his former House GOP colleagues that the president wanted a vote on Friday. It was time to move on to other priorities, including tax reform, he told House Republicans.

“He said the president needs this, the president has said he wants a vote tomorrow, up or down. If for any reason it goes down, we’re just going to move forward with additional parts of his agenda. This is our moment in time,” said Rep. Chris Collins (R-N.Y.), a loyal Trump ally, told reporters late Thursday. “If it doesn’t pass, we’re moving beyond health care. … We are done negotiating.”

Trump’s edict clearly irked some lawmakers, including the Freedom Caucus chairman, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C), whose group of more than two dozen members represented the strongest bloc against the measure.

“Anytime you don’t have 216 votes, negotiations are not totally over,” he told reporters who had surrounded him in a Capitol basement hallway as he headed in to the party’s caucus meeting.

Shortly before Ryan’s press conference, Trump called Washington Post reporter Robert Costa to say they were pulling the bill back from consideration. Costa said the president seemed at ease with the decision and did not blame Ryan for the defeat.

Trump, Ryan and other GOP lawmakers tweaked their initial package in a variety of ways to win over both conservatives and moderates. But every time one change was made to win votes in one camp, it repelled support in another.

The White House on Thursday accepted conservatives’ demands that the legislation strip federal guarantees of essential health benefits in insurance policies. But that was another problem for moderates and Democrats suggested the provision would not survive in the Senate.

Republican moderates in the House — as well as the Senate — objected to the bill’s provisions that would shift Medicaid from an open-ended entitlement to a set amount of funding for states that would also give governors and state lawmakers more flexibility over the program.  Moderates also were concerned that the package’s tax credits would not be generous enough to help older Americans — who could be charged five times more for coverage than their younger counterparts — afford coverage.

The House package also lost the support of key GOP allies, including the Club for Growth and Heritage Action. Physician, patient and hospital groups also opposed it.

It’s not clear what will happen next to the Republican effort to overturn or modify Obamacare. But White House officials told members Thursday that if they couldn’t pass the legislation, the president wanted to turn to other priorities, including tax reform. “The president understands this is it,” Spicer said. “We had this opportunity to — to change the trajectory of health care, to help improve — put a health care system in place and to end the nightmare that Republicans have campaigned on called Obamacare.”

Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a national health policy news service. It is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Not A Done Deal: Ryan Pulls Back Bill To Replace Obamacare

Despite days of intense negotiations and last-minute concessions to win over wavering GOP conservatives and moderates, House Republican leaders Friday failed to win enough support to pass their plan to partially repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

House Speaker Paul Ryan made the announcement at the Capitol after rushing to the White House to meet with President Donald Trump. The decision came after a fluid 24 hours of negotiation among Republican leaders and different factions of the party. The leadership had hoped to have a vote on their bill Thursday but put that off after it was clear they didn’t have enough “yes” votes. Trump issued an ultimatum to House members Thursday night, saying he was done with concessions and they needed to vote Friday to get the legislation moving. But the gambit did not change enough votes to push the bill through the House.

Story is developing. Check back here for more details shortly.

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