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NASA doesn't care about your zodiac sign

The zodiac has been around for thousands of years and has always contained 12 signs — until recently. NASA pointed out there's actually a 13th constellation within it. 

Cue a bunch of people having a crisis on Twitter about their astrological signs possibly changing. 

>> Read more trending stories

But NASA doesn't care whether you're a Leo or a Sagittarius. It just wants the zodiac to be factually accurate. 

In a recent Tumblr post, NASA reported the ancient Babylonians originally started out with 13 constellations that the sun appeared to pass through. 

But in order to make their zodiac fit within their 12-month calendar, one of the constellations had to be left out. So Ophiuchus got the ax. 

NASA also pointed out that the Babylonian's zodiac doesn't exactly work as intended anymore, since the Earth's axis has shifted slightly in the last 3,000 years. 

So astrology might not be that scientific, but NASA's not trying to change it. Just know that if you're a die-hard Scorpio, you could've just as easily been an Ophiuchus. Doesn't that roll off the tongue?

From cheerleader to addict: Heroin lifestyle killed mother of 4

Police are searching for the person who killed a 26-year-old mother of four, wrapped her in a rug and left her on the side of the road.

Morgan Oller was found dead near Chappell Road in Atlanta on Aug. 10.

But Oller’s mother, Mitze Hester, said although someone is responsible for her death, she believes Morgan’s heroin lifestyle is what killed her.

Marijuana in middle school eventually led to meth in high school, and Oller's life spiraled out of control from there.

"She was trying to fit in," Hester said.

>> Read more trending stories

Oller soon began to take pain pills.

“Oxycodone was the gateway to her using heroin,” Hester said.

The progression was tracked not only in drug types, but also in photos. From a bright, shining mother during a clean period in her life to a woman barely recognizable to her parents not long before an officer knocked on their door.

“I just said 'My daughter's dead, isn’t she?’ And he nodded his head 'yes,'” Hester said.

A passerby found Oller’s body wrapped in a rug, a deflated air mattress and bedding.

“It was almost like somebody putting out the garbage,” Atlanta police Maj. Adam Lee said.

“You don’t expect to get that about your baby. You hear it on the news and it’s somebody else but not your child,” Hester said.

Police are investigating the death as a homicide.

“Our best detectives, they need the public's help, and that's what we're asking for now,” Lee said.

Hester says she desperately wants justice, but she also wants people to know how the lifestyle of a heroin addict endangered Oller, who had four children on her own in a mostly sober period.

“If she hadn’t have been using, she would have been home with her children,” she said.

Now Oller’s parents are on a mission to make sure what happened to their daughter doesn’t happen to yours.

“We take it upon ourselves to tell every parent we can, ‘It can happen to you,’” Oller’s stepfather, Jim Hester, said.

That’s something Mecca Marson knows all too well.

I realize I could have lost my life several times through heroin addiction,” she said. “It’s not just about the drugs and using the drugs, it's the lifestyle that goes along with it.”

Marson says drug court has helped her stay off heroin for roughly six months.

“God gave me the strength to keep going. He gives me the strength to keep going. 'Cause I do get called by heroin. Every day I get called,” she said.

She says the heroin lifestyle nearly killed her.

“I had to jump out of an 18-wheeler during a drug deal. I was attacked several times while I was on heroin,” she said. “All your inhibitions are lowered. Anything goes. Anything’s acceptable.”

Mitze Hester says that lifestyle had overtaken her daughter.

“Morgan had stolen everything that she could from me,” Hester said.

She says Oller went to rehab roughly 15 times, costing family members hundreds of thousands of dollars.

“We pulled money out of 401Ks. We drained savings accounts. We used college funds,” Hester said.

Jim Hester says in the year and a half that he's been married to Mitze Hester, he never met Oller. They made the hard decision not to bring her lifestyle around her 15-year-old sister. But he says no matter where you live, that lifestyle is not far away.

“If you think that because you live out in the suburbs or in Gwinnett County or Cobb County, regardless, you’re close to where heroin's being sold and used,” he said.

He says Oller’s father, Bryan Pritchard, worked very hard with her mother in the efforts to save their daughter.

“I hope the pain in us losing Morgan will open somebody else's eyes,” Mitze Hester said. “As hard as it is to lose my baby, I don’t want somebody else to lose theirs. Well over a month has passed (and I think about it) every second of every day. It doesn’t go away.”

Woman called ‘hero’ after chasing man who set fire to Auburn’s iconic trees

Auburn University junior Herron Taylor found herself in an unbelievable position early Sunday morning.

The biomedical sciences major had participated in the university’s famed celebration following a Saturday night football victory: rolling the oaks in Toomer’s Corner. The Auburn Tigers and their fans were celebrating a last-second 18-13 victory over LSU when suspect Jochen Wiest, 29, of Auburn, allegedly lit the tree on fire.

Taylor told the Plainsman, Auburn University’s newspaper, that a friend was taking a picture of her and her boyfriend, Brendan McGowan, when McGowan saw Wiest with a lighter in his hand.

“My boyfriend said, ‘He just lit the tree on fire,’” Taylor told the student newspaper. “So I turned around and sure enough, the dude’s standing there with a lighter still in his hand.”

Taylor said her first instinct was to put out the fire, which had been ignited using a strand of the tissue the tree had been rolled with and which had engulfed the tree within seconds. She quickly realized there was nothing she could do to stop the blaze.

She turned her attention to Wiest.  

“He was trying to get away and I was, like, ‘No, no, not today,’” Taylor told the Plainsman. “We just got our trees back.”

>> Read more trending stories

The oak trees in Toomer’s Corner are relatively new. Their predecessors were poisoned in late 2010.

Taylor told Fox 10 out of Mobile, Alabama, that she and her boyfriend realized they had to stop Wiest, who at that point was fleeing down the street.

"I was screaming, running after him saying, 'This is the guy that lit the fire,'" Taylor told the news station. "At that point, the tree had already been engulfed in flames, so a bunch of guys around me tackled him to the ground and started beating him up."

Taylor said rumors that the suspect was an LSU fan were false. An Auburn resident, he was wearing an Auburn hat at the scene, she said.

It was only later, when she was giving a statement to police, that Taylor learned she had been caught, chasing the suspect, on the city’s Toomer’s Corner surveillance camera. He had also been caught lighting the tree on fire.

The video has since gone viral on social media, with Taylor being called a hero for her actions.

Wiest, initially charged with public intoxication, had also been charged with desecration of a venerable object for setting fire to the oak tree. The Plainsman reported Monday afternoon that Auburn police investigators had added a felony charge of first-degree criminal mischief to Wiest’s list of charges. He remained in the Lee County Jail, his bail set at $4,500.

Gary Keever, a horticulture professor at Auburn, told the Plainsman that he doesn’t think the burned tree is dead, but that its future remains uncertain. The upper and lower canopies, as well as the base of the trunk, suffered damage in the fire.

“Based on the leaf curl and off color of the foliage in parts of the canopy, these leaves will drop over the next several days,” Keever told the newspaper.

If the tree survives, it could still suffer aesthetic death, in which its condition detracts from its surroundings. In that case, it may need to be replaced, he said.

It could be spring before the full impact of the fire is determined. 

Identical twin: I committed murder, not my brother

Prison records show that Karl Smith, a ward of the Chicago prison system, has a tattoo of a skull with a top hat on his left upper arm which also includes the words, “Trust me.”

Prosecutors found that hard to do last week as Smith, 38, sat in a courtroom and confessed to a 2003 murder for which his identical twin brother, Kevin Dugar, has served 13 years in prison.

"I'm here to confess to a crime I committed that he was wrongly accused of," Smith testified, according to the Chicago Tribune.

Dugar, who had not seen his brother in years, sat nearby and wiped tears from his eyes.

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Cook County prosecutors were dubious about Smith’s claim, pointing out that he only came forward after an appeals court denied his bid to toss out his own attempted murder conviction for a separate crime. Smith is serving 99 years for his part in a home invasion and armed robbery that left a 6-year-old boy shot in the head.

"He's got nothing to lose," Assistant State's Attorney Carol Rogala said of Smith’s confession.

The Tribune reported that Rogala argued that Smith’s confession didn’t fit “independent eyewitness accounts of what happened."

It is unclear when the judge in the case will decide whether or not Dugar will be granted a new trial.

Those who know the twins told the Tribune that they were closer than siblings growing up, sharing everything – clothes, food and each other’s names. Their mother, Judy Dugar, said that even she and their father, who died last month, couldn’t always tell them apart. In court, only their uniforms, from separate prison facilities, distinguished the two.

Both standing 5 feet 9 inches tall, just 5 pounds separates the brothers, Illinois Department of Corrections records show. They both keep their hair cropped close to their heads and trim their beards in nearly identical patterns.

Different tattoos, and healed gunshot wounds on Dugar’s right hip, also mark who is who.

The Tribune reported that the twins’ mother wept as Smith, who took her maiden name in adulthood, confessed to murder. It was the first time in several years that she and her sons were in the same room together.

Smith confessed to a March 2003 shooting near Sheridan Road and Argyle Street in Chicago that killed Antwan Carter and wounded a second person, Ronnie Bolden. The Tribune reported that Bolden testified at Dugar’s 2005 trial that the gunman was “Twin,” the street name used by both Smith and Dugar, who often impersonated each other.

Drug dealers and gang members at the time, the brothers would use one another’s names interchangeably. Smith testified last week that he was stopped by police shortly after Carter’s murder, but was allowed to leave after identifying himself as his brother.

Bolden, a member of a rival gang, testified at Dugar’s murder trial that he initially didn’t identify Dugar as the gunman because he wanted to settle it himself on the street, the Tribune reported. He eventually identified Dugar in a photo lineup that did not include Smith.

A second witness, a 16-year-old girl, recanted her testimony at the trial, saying that she identified Dugar as the gunman after Bolden told her to. Based largely on those eyewitness statements, Dugar was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to 54 years in prison.

Smith testified that he kept his secret to himself until 2013, a decade after the slaying, the Tribune reported. At that time, he sat down in his cell at Menard Correctional Center, in Pontiac, and wrote to his brother, who was housed in Stateville Correctional.

"I have to get it off my chest before it kills me," Smith wrote. "So I'll just come clean and pray you can forgive me. I'm the one who and shot and killed those two Black Stones on Sheridan that night."

Dugar didn’t respond to that first letter, the Tribune reported. When Smith wrote a second letter a few weeks later, he responded and asked his brother to write to his attorney.

Smith ended up signing a sworn statement in 2014 in which he confessed to the murder.

Now that the case has seen the inside of a courtroom, the twins’ mother hopes at least one of her sons will gain his freedom.

"I hope Kevin will get out. I hope he change his whole life around," Judy Dugar told the Tribune, crying. "He got to."

Use debate as teachable moment, parenting expert says

The presidential race might be one of the most negative and nasty campaigns in modern U.S. history, with candidates being attacked as criminals, racists, sexists and liars. And even if parents don't like it, children are being exposed to it in school, on television and online.

Parenting expert Stacy Skelly said parents need to look for teachable moments in this year's presidential election.

>> Read more trending stories

"It actually gives you a chance to say, 'Here is what is happening in the world around you, and here is how you can think about it,'" said Skelly, who works for educational research think tank Pearson. "Explain the process instead of focusing on some of the nastiness we've been hearing."

Skelly said the first presidential debate can also be an opportunity to talk about bullying, and what behaviors are and are not acceptable.

Skelly said that among the questions that parents could consider asking their children when politics turn negative are, "Is that the way you want to be treated?" or, "What would you do if you saw someone being treated poorly?"

She said parents can play a role in raising the next generation of voters.

Skelly said it's important not to try to shield children from politics, but to discuss the policies of political parties and the importance of voting.

Ex-Syrian Intelligence officer lied to get U.S. citizenship, may be hiding in Florida, FBI says

A former brigadier general with Syrian Intelligence Directorate lied to apply for U.S. citizenship and may be hiding out in South Florida, the FBI said.

The most recent photo available to law enforcement of 75-year-old Moustafa Abed Ayoub was taken in 2006, investigators said.

>> Read more trending stories

An FBI release said Ayoub was a commander with the Syrian Intelligence Directorate from the early 1980s through the late 1990s.

Officials said he is wanted on accusations he provided false testimony during U.S. naturalization proceedings.

To be eligible for U.S. citizenship, an individual filing for citizenship must have been in the country for at least 30 months, which Ayoub said he had been, the FBI Miami field office said.

Travel records show that during the past 30 months, Ayoub had traveled outside the U.S. for more than 1,020 days, investigators said.

A warrant for his arrest was filed in Florida, where he has ties to Fort Lauderdale and Miami, the FBI said. It is also possible he is in Syria or Lebanon.

The FBI is offering a reward for information leading directly to the arrest of Moustafa Abed Ayoub. If you have any...Posted by FBI – Federal Bureau of Investigation on Monday, August 22, 2016

Houston shooting: Gunman who injured 9 identified

City officials identified the attorney who injured nine people Monday in a shooting in southwest Houston as Nathan DeSai, the Houston Chronicle reported.

>> Read more trending stories

DeSai opened fire, apparently at random, at people as they were in their vehicles on Monday, according to police.

Firefighters stumbled upon the shooting-in-progress when they arrived at the intersection of Bissonnett and Weslayan streets around 6:30 a.m. in response to a call about a discharged firearm, Assistant Fire Chief Richard Mann said.

>> Related: Shooter injures multiple people in Houston; suspect dead

Nine people were injured, Interim Police Chief Martha Montalvo said.

DeSai "was firing actively at officers" when police arrived, Montalvo said. DeSai was shot and killed by police.

Here is what we know about Monday's attack:

<iframe src="//storify.com/cmgnationalnews/905428135db679ac87391aba04caf6a6/embed?header=none&amp;border=false" width="100%" height="750" frameborder="no" allowtransparency="true"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/cmgnationalnews/905428135db679ac87391aba04caf6a6.js?header=none&amp;border=false"></script>[View the story "Gunman who injured 9 in Houston identified: What we know" on Storify]

Identical twin: I committed murder, not my brother

Prison records show that Karl Smith, a ward of the Chicago prison system, has a tattoo of a skull with a top hat on his left upper arm which also includes the words, “Trust me.”

Prosecutors found that hard to do last week as Smith, 38, sat in a courtroom and confessed to a 2003 murder for which his identical twin brother, Kevin Dugar, has served 13 years in prison.

"I'm here to confess to a crime I committed that he was wrongly accused of," Smith testified, according to the Chicago Tribune.

Dugar, who had not seen his brother in years, sat nearby and wiped tears from his eyes.

>> Read more trending stories

Cook County prosecutors were dubious about Smith’s claim, pointing out that he only came forward after an appeals court denied his bid to toss out his own attempted murder conviction for a separate crime. Smith is serving 99 years for his part in a home invasion and armed robbery that left a 6-year-old boy shot in the head.

"He's got nothing to lose," Assistant State's Attorney Carol Rogala said of Smith’s confession.

The Tribune reported that Rogala argued that Smith’s confession didn’t fit “independent eyewitness accounts of what happened."

It is unclear when the judge in the case will decide whether or not Dugar will be granted a new trial.

Those who know the twins told the Tribune that they were closer than siblings growing up, sharing everything – clothes, food and each other’s names. Their mother, Judy Dugar, said that even she and their father, who died last month, couldn’t always tell them apart. In court, only their uniforms, from separate prison facilities, distinguished the two.

Both standing 5 feet 9 inches tall, just 5 pounds separates the brothers, Illinois Department of Corrections records show. They both keep their hair cropped close to their heads and trim their beards in nearly identical patterns.

Different tattoos, and healed gunshot wounds on Dugar’s right hip, also mark who is who.

The Tribune reported that the twins’ mother wept as Smith, who took her maiden name in adulthood, confessed to murder. It was the first time in several years that she and her sons were in the same room together.

Smith confessed to a March 2003 shooting near Sheridan Road and Argyle Street in Chicago that killed Antwan Carter and wounded a second person, Ronnie Bolden. The Tribune reported that Bolden testified at Dugar’s 2005 trial that the gunman was “Twin,” the street name used by both Smith and Dugar, who often impersonated each other.

Drug dealers and gang members at the time, the brothers would use one another’s names interchangeably. Smith testified last week that he was stopped by police shortly after Carter’s murder, but was allowed to leave after identifying himself as his brother.

Bolden, a member of a rival gang, testified at Dugar’s murder trial that he initially didn’t identify Dugar as the gunman because he wanted to settle it himself on the street, the Tribune reported. He eventually identified Dugar in a photo lineup that did not include Smith.

A second witness, a 16-year-old girl, recanted her testimony at the trial, saying that she identified Dugar as the gunman after Bolden told her to. Based largely on those eyewitness statements, Dugar was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to 54 years in prison.

Smith testified that he kept his secret to himself until 2013, a decade after the slaying, the Tribune reported. At that time, he sat down in his cell at Menard Correctional Center, in Pontiac, and wrote to his brother, who was housed in Stateville Correctional.

"I have to get it off my chest before it kills me," Smith wrote. "So I'll just come clean and pray you can forgive me. I'm the one who and shot and killed those two Black Stones on Sheridan that night."

Dugar didn’t respond to that first letter, the Tribune reported. When Smith wrote a second letter a few weeks later, he responded and asked his brother to write to his attorney.

Smith ended up signing a sworn statement in 2014 in which he confessed to the murder.

Now that the case has seen the inside of a courtroom, the twins’ mother hopes at least one of her sons will gain his freedom.

"I hope Kevin will get out. I hope he change his whole life around," Judy Dugar told the Tribune, crying. "He got to."

Walmart employees refuse to make 'Blue Lives Matter' police cake

The daughter of a police officer said she asked a metro Atlanta Walmart to make a "Blue Lives Matter" cake for her father's retirement party, but employees refused.

>> Read more trending stories

The woman said she asked for a cake decorated with a black and blue police flag last week for a party held Sunday, according to Rare.com. A bakery employee at the Walmart on Willow Lane in McDonough refused the woman's request.

"One of the bakers told me the design could be perceived as racist and nobody feels comfortable decorating the cake," the woman told Fox News' Todd Starnes, who broke the story.

She then asked for a black cake with a blue line through it. A bakery employee again refused.

"I asked her, 'Is there something wrong with cops?'" the woman said.

The manager of the Walmart, after hearing of her story, offered the woman a free cake and a $50 gift card. When bakery employees refused to comply with his orders, the store manager decorated the cake himself.

The woman said the results were "unprofessional" and she had no time to get another cake.

While Rare and Starnes did not identify the woman, Walmart spokeswoman Leslee Wright acknowledged the "misstep" in a statement to The AJC.

"We have addressed this issue with everyone involved and are taking steps to make sure no other customers have this kind of experience in our stores," Wright said. "We're glad we were able to connect with the family to apologize and make this right."

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