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Artists revamp 'Baby it's Cold Outside' lyrics 'to be not creepy'

A pair of Minnesota musicians have put their twist on a catchy but not so up-to-date holiday classic, humorously changing the lyrics of "Baby it's Cold Outside" to emphasize consent.

>> Read more trending stories

The original duet was written in 1944. To summarize the lyrics, a woman sings about wanting to go home after a date with a man, who insists that she stay with him.

The song has been controversial in recent years – and deemed by some to be the worst Christmas song of all time – because of the man's insistence that the woman stay despite her telling him no clearly and repeatedly.

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"I ought to say no, no, no sir," the female lead sings. "At least I'm going to say that I tried."

"What's the sense of hurting my pride?" the male lead answers.

Artists Lydia Liza and Josiah Lemanski decided to take back the lyrics, posting what Liza deemed a "less sexually aggressive" version of the song Monday on SoundCloud.

"My mother will start to worry," Liza croons.

"Call her so she know that you're coming," Lemanski responds.

Most of Liza's lines stay true to the original song, although Lemanski's have been drastically changed.

"I wish I knew how to break the spell," Liza sings.

"I don't know what you're talking about," Lemanski answers.

In its first few days online, the song garnered more than 26,000 listens.

Hear the full song:

Study: Believing in Santa Claus could be damaging to children

A new study poses the theory that kids believing in Santa Claus could be damaging in the long run and cause them to distrust parents.

>> Read more trending stories

CBS News reports that the study by a psychology professor at the University of Exeter in the U.K. hypothesized that the "morality of making children believe in such myths has to be questioned."

"If they are capable of lying about something so special and magical, can they be relied upon to continue as the guardians of wisdom and truth?" the study said. "If adults have been lying about Santa, even though it has usually been well intentioned, what else is a lie? If Santa isn't real, are fairies real? Is magic? Is God?"

In a statement, Professor Christopher Boyle said that children will discover that they've been lied to for years and may wonder about other lies being told to them.

"Whether it's right to make children believe in Father Christmas is an interesting question, and it's also interesting to ask whether lying in this way will affect children in ways that have not been considered," Boyle said.

But a psychology professor at Wake Forest University told CBS News that she disagrees with Boyle's research, saying that she finds nothing wrong with a little make believe.

"I think lie is a harsh word to use here," Deborah Best said. "I think a better way to look at it is that it's a family secret."

Best added that she finds that believing in Santa Claus works as a way to reward good behavior, and it promotes spreading generosity and joy.

"I think most children are disappointed when they find out that their parents are Santa Claus," she told CBS News. "They're disappointed in the magic going away, but I'm not so sure that they're angry at their parents about lying. I don't think I've ever heard that. It's more of a loss of that magical part of childhood."

Best and Mona Delahooke, a pediatric psychologist specializing in early child development, told CBS that they agree with the research saying that presenting Santa as an all-seeing authority is wrong.

Read more at CBS News.

Mall of America's first-ever black Santa makes history

Santa Claus is making history at the Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota, after being open for 24 years.

WCCO reported that the first black Santa is coming to the mall's The Santa Experience photo studio.

>> Read more trending stories

Larry Jefferson, from Dallas, is the history-making Claus.

"It gives the kids an opportunity to have a Santa who looks like them," Jefferson said. "It gives them something to identify with, but Santa is still just Santa."

Landon Luther, co-owner of the Santa Experience, told the Star Tribune the search for a Santa "for everyone" began months ago.

Luther went to a Santa convention in Branson, Missouri, and found Jefferson. Out of about 1,000 Santas, Jefferson was the only Santa of color there.

"It was like finding a needle in a haystack," Luther told the Star Tribune.

Despite making history, Jefferson is modest.

"It’s no big deal. I’m still Santa, I just happen to be a Santa of color," he told WCCO.

"I was doing an event, and one child said, ‘Santa, you’re brown,’ and I said, ‘Yes, I am, but Santa comes in many different colors.’ He said, ‘Oh,’ so I gave him a candy cane, he ran off with other kids," he said. "Kids are just kids. They're very innocent. They just love Santa."

Mall visitors can make an appointment to have photos taken with Santa Larry Thursday through Saturday at the Mall of America website.

"This is a long time coming," Luther said. "We want Santa to be for everyone, period."

Google and NORAD Santa tracker 2016: It’s never too early to look for the jolly old elf

Both the North American Aerospace Defense Command and the search engine Google powered up their radar Thursday in anticipation of the annual one-night, round-the-world-flight of a certain resident of the North Pole.

For more than 60 years, NORAD has turned all of its tracking capabilities toward following the progress of Santa Claus and his reindeer as he takes flight on Christmas Eve. For the hardcore Santa follower, NORAD’s website does not disappoint.

In the run-up to the big day, visitors can head to the website to watch a movie, play some games, hear some music and learn about St. Nicholas, his elves and his sleigh. NORAD also has a presence at the North Pole (check out the Secret Santa Files).

You can go to NORAD’s tracking site here. 

Over at Google, it’s been only 12 years since Santa has been on their radar, literally, and they have pulled out all the Christmas stops this year.

Google’s Santa Tracker includes Santa’s Village which opened Thursday. There is a countdown clock there, too, and as we move toward Dec. 24, the village unlocks new games and experiences for visitors. 

Google also reminds users that you can search for Santa directly in Google Maps and google.com in addition to using the Santa Tracker. You can even go into Street View to look at the cities he is visiting as he makes his trip to deliver toys.

 This year, Santa’s Village has some new games – sliding penguins and dancing elves, as Google notes – in addition to games available only on the Android app.

“As we get closer to the big day, you can ask your Pixel device or Google Home "Where is Santa". The answer may surprise you,” Google says on the site.

While the two sites have different features, where the come together is when they go into tracking mode on Christmas Eve. You can watch Santa as he leaves the North Pole headed on his worldwide voyage in real-time. He visits countries around the world through the day and brings it home to the United States by Christmas Eve night. 

Oh course, you really should be in bed by that time.

20 best things to do in Atlanta this Christmas

It's the most wonderful time of the year, and there are many magical activities around Atlanta this holiday season.

 

Whether you already have special traditions or are looking to make some new ones, here is our ultimate guide to the holidays in Atlanta. Cross all of these events and actitivities off of your holiday to-do list and you're sure to have a holly jolly season. You won't want to miss a thing

 

Visit live nativity scenes. Slow down for a spell and immerse yourself into a live and interactive nativity scene. 

 

Have some snowy fun. A white Christmas is within grasp, even in the Deep South. 

 

Ride the Macy's Pink PigFor more than 50 years, the Macy's Pink Pig has marked the beginning of the holiday season for Atlantans. Ride through a life-sized storybook filled with friends and fun under the signature 170-foot, 1950s-themed Pink Pig Tent.

 

Go ice skating. Glide on Atlanta open-air ice rinks for a winter experience like no other, even if it isn't below freezing just yet. 

 

See the Nutcracker. Ride the nostalgic wave that is the Nutcracker and feel like you're a kid all over again. 

 

Take a hike. Cooler weather and dazzling leaf colors make fall one the most popular seasons for hiking. Head to one of these great north Georgia trails to soak up some classic autumn beauty.

 

Light the night. Enter a world of dazzle and wonder by exploring the many holiday lights shows around metro Atlanta.

 

Enjoy beautiful music at a classical Christmas concert. Classical holiday performances are all about tradition and familiarity. Every year, the Spelman-Morehouse Christmas Carol Concert will be riveting, and performances of holiday favorites by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra will invoke a twinge of nostalgia. Learn about these and more.

 

See A Christmas Story: The Musical at the Fox. Atlanta is one of eight stops for the national tour. The stage version is based on a much beloved Christmas movie.

 

Stand on the sidelines of a holiday parade. In a season chock full of parades, you need a comprehensive guide as to not miss the party.

 

Enjoy a new holiday tradition close to home. Choose from Christmas events in Gwinnett CountyDeKalb CountyNorth Fulton CountyCobb County.

 

Go on a romantic holiday date night. Looking for a special evening designed for two? You needn't look any further for some great holiday-inspired ideas for a romantic night out. 

 

See a holiday movie. Catch a familiar classic guaranteed to warm the heart, or watch a new festive film to be cherished for holidays to come. 

 

Watch Christmas tree lightings around metro Atlanta. Christmas tree lightings are an important symbol that mark the beginning of the season. Start your holiday off right by attending one of these special ceremonies. 

 

Go to the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl (and the parade). There's something for everyone this season, including the passionate football fan. Head downtown to see the parade. 

 

Buy a local Christmas treeYour Christmas tree lives with you for a month out of the year, so it should be the perfect one to compliment your home. 

 

Escape to these magical destinations close to home. Sometimes we need to get out of town to appreciate the spirit of the season. You need not travel far to find serene landscapes that capture what the holidays are all about. 

 

 

 

RELATED: 7 locations in metro Atlanta and beyond for holiday light shows

 

 

 

RELATED: Where to find ice skating, tubing, other winter fun in metro Atlanta

 

 

 

RELATED: Atlanta Holiday Guide

 

RELATED: Best Christmas light displays in the South

After surviving a rare birth defect, baby has sweetest reaction to seeing first snow

A baby girl’s reaction to seeing her first snowfall has gone viral.

Clara Ray was born with numerous physical problems, including two holes in her heart. When she was just 6 days old, doctors performed open-heart surgery on the newborn.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

Despite the setbacks, Clara survived and is now 5 months old. Her mother, Johanna Morton, posted photos to Facebook showing Clara’s reaction to seeing her first snow while celebrating Thanksgiving in Cornwallville, New York.

>> Read more trending stories

“She was, like, mesmerized,” Morton told Inside Edition. “She just kept smiling.”

Doctors aren’t sure how long Clara has to live. They told her family to enjoy every day they have with her.

>> See the viral photos below

<script>(function(d, s, id) {   var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];   if (d.getElementById(id)) return;   js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;   js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&amp;version=v2.8";   fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));</script> "Good morning, Family. ☀️️I woke up to my  first snow fall and I love it! 🌨Mommy and daddy are going to have to get me a...Posted by Prayers for Clara Ray on Sunday, November 20, 2016

Patagonia to donate $10 million from Black Friday revenue

Before Thanksgiving, outdoor clothing and gear company Patagonia promised to donate 100 percent of its Black Friday sales revenue to  "grassroots organizations working in local communities to protect our air, water and soil for future generations."

>> Read more trending stories  

The company expected to reach $2 million in sales online and across its 80 stores, but that goal was met many times over -- five times to be exact. 

The company sold $10 million worth of merchandise. 

"We're humbled to report the response was beyond expectations ... Patagonia reached a record-breaking $10 million in sales," the company said in a statement. "The enormous love our customers showed to the planet on Black Friday enables us to give every penny to hundreds of grassroots environmental organizations working around the world." 

Lisa Pike Sheehy, vice president of environmental activism at Patagonia, told CNN that the decision to donate the funds to hundreds of environment-conscious organizations across the country came after Election Day.

"This is a difficult and divisive time for our country. I believe the environment is something we can all come together on," Sheehy said. "Environmental values are something we all embrace."

"The threats facing our planet affect people of every political stripe, of every demographic, in every part of the country," CEO Rose Marcario said in a Nov. 21 statement. "We all stand to benefit from a healthy environment." 

The funds raised on Black Friday will go to environmental groups in more than 20 countries. 

"The majority of the grantees are grassroots environmental nonprofit organizations working to address the effects of climate change and other issues affecting our planet," a spokeswoman for the company said. "(Most) of them are local and underfunded and they are in countries and communities where Patagonia has people on the ground -- from Ventura, California, to Osaka, Japan. It will take six to 18 months to disburse the funds." 

Inventor fights 'porch pirates' stalking on 'package theft Wednesday'

Now that "Cyber Monday" is in the rear view mirror, police are warning people to be on the lookout for thieves marking their calendars for "Package Theft Wednesday," which is the first day many of those Cyber Monday deliveries will be made.

A Seattle inventor who came up with an idea for a device with an app -- which notifies when packages delivered -- and when that package is moved, is now shipping the device all over the country as fast as his company can build them. 

"People are even stealing packages on bikes. They're riding on their bikes going up to the porch, and stealing the packages," said Mike Grabham, who invented "The Package Guard" after he was victimized by package thieves. 

>> Read more trending stories  

In ten months the idea has gone from prototype to mass production. 

The device (which is the size of a frisbee) when placed on a porch or doorway, is activated when a package is placed on top of it. 

"The app on your phone alert you that you've had a package delivered," said Grabham.  

If the package is lifted or moved before the app is disarmed, an extremely loud shrill alarm sounds until the person using the app deactivates it. 

"It's really loud it's about 100 decibels, so your neighbors are also alerted," he said.

Grabham's vision is for thieves (he calls them "Porch Pirates") to regard the device as a very loud deterrent. 

"If the thieves keep moving, when they see this, we win," he said."

Grabham says he can also envision a day when his product will work with Amazon's drone package deliveries of the future. 

"We're already working on that," he said. 

Dog who loves Santa toy gets to meet the real thing

Christmas came early for one dog this year.

ABC News reported that Kya, a 1-year-old shiba inu that belongs to Orlando, Florida, siblings John, 16; Christina, 18; and Angelina Montaldo, 19, is particularly fond of her Santa plush toy.

>> Read more trending stories

"Last year we got her (this toy) at the dollar store when we first got her," John told ABC News. "She just always liked that one and bit his beard and stuff."

Angelina told BuzzFeed News that Kya, who has her own Instagram page, loves the toy so much, they have an extra one.

"She really loves her Santa, and she has to have it year-round," Angelina, said. "Whenever we come home, she brings it to us."

So this year, when they found out their local mall was offering pet photos with Santa, they surprised their dog with a visit.

John tweeted about the photo Tuesday and it has almost 90,000 retweets and nearly 150,000 likes.

"Once she first saw him, she was getting really excited," John told ABC News. "She was super calm and looking at him amazed."

"She just sat there and looked at him," Angelina told BuzzFeed. "She usually misbehaves when we take her to Petsmart, but she was behaving for Santa."

Secret Santa drops $1K gold coin in red kettle for what might be second year in a row

The Salvation Army Corps of Springfield, Ohio, got a kick start to its holiday fundraising when they found a gold coin worth $1,000 in one of its red kettles.

It’s the second time in two years that a South African gold coin wrapped in a $100 bill has been dropped in a red kettle at the Kroger store on Bechtle Avenue, Salvation Army Resource Developer Ryan Ray said.

>> Read more trending stories

Around the same time last year, a gold coin valued at $1,200 was dropped in the bucket, Ray said.

The Salvation Army never figured out who dropped the coin, he said.

The Red Kettle Campaign kicked off on Nov. 4 and runs through Christmas Eve.

More than 800 Clark County families signed up for Christmas assistance through the Springfield Salvation Army office this year, Ray said.

Money raised in the kettles goes toward community programming for the Salvation Army throughout the year. The organization says that for every dollar donated to the Salvation Army in Clark County, 83 cents goes back to the community.

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