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Angry dad says he overdosed on heroin to scare son into rehab

The heroin epidemic in America has left thousands dead and ravaged countless families. One father in Brooklyn, New York, told the New York Post that he was infuriated when he found his son’s heroin stash. In fact, he said he was so mad that he shot up the drug himself just to show his son a lesson – then overdosed himself.

Sergey Gnatovskiy told the Post, “I [tried] to send him to rehab. He promised me he was going to go, and I found it again.”

>> Read more trending news

His son reportedly came home Wednesday afternoon to find his father passed out on the floor and had to use CPR and Narcan to bring his dad back from an overdose that threatened his life. It was an eerie moment, considering that his father has had to do the same thing on four different occasions with his son.

But Gnatovskiy said his son has been scared into returning to rehab.

“After seeing this, I definitely want to go," his son said. "I’ve been doing this since I was 15. I’m 23 now; I can’t keep doing this.”

The father said he doesn’t remember the moment. He only remembers going to turn off the television and waking up surrounded by medical personnel.

Gnatovskiy said his son has caused him a world of trouble. A fight in Gnatovskiy's apartment led to an eviction notice, kicking both father and son out of the apartment at the end of May. Gnatovskiy reportedly is only allowed to stay if he can prove that his son is no longer living with him.

The dad became emotional, yelling, “If I lose you — I don’t know. Look what you made me do yesterday? I’ll give you my home, my car, my heart. I don’t want to lose you.”

Read more here.

Babies may sleep longer in own rooms, study finds

Baby not sleeping well? It could be because you’re sharing a room with your little one.

Last October, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued new recommendations that at least until six months, preferably until age 1, your child should share a room with you, but not the same bed.

Now, a study that will be published in the July issue of Pediatrics found that babies who shared a room with their parents slept less than those who did not. The study, called Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Health Trajectories, studied 230 mother-infant pairs from January 2012 to March 2014. The infants fell into three categories: those who were independent sleepers by 4 months (62 percent), those who were independent sleepers between 4 months and 9 months (27 percent), and those who were still sleeping in the same room as their parents at 9 months (11 percent).

>> Read more trending news

The study was actually about obesity prevention, but researchers found that there were differences in bedtime routines. Babies who shared a room at 4 months were less likely to be put to bed before 8 p.m. They also were more likely to have something in their bed that shouldn’t be there, such as a blanket, pillow or stuffed animal, and were more likely to be brought into their parents’ bed sometime in the night.

How long babies slept was also different. By 9 months, the babies who had been sleeping independently at 4 months slept a stretch of 7 hours and 49 minutes. The room-sharing babies were sleeping only 7 hours in a row at 9 months.

What researchers found was it was all about establishing those bedtime routines: when a baby gets put to sleep, how often a baby is fed in the middle of the night and whether a baby is fed back to sleep or goes back to sleep on his own.

The American Academy of Pediatrics doesn’t want to revise its recommendations about room sharing, but it does acknowledge that parents want to get more sleep and that more research needs to be done to consider whether it should reverse its new policy.

5 tips to keep you from getting sick on vacation

It’s easy to get sick when you’re traveling, because your immune system is exposed to new environments and germs it isn’t used to fighting. Plus, if you tend to eat less healthy food on vacation, your body might be missing some key nutrients it needs to stay in tip-top shape.

>> Read more trending news

Use these tips to keep yourself healthy:

Use hand sanitizer

You may want to use hand sanitizer after any outing in a public space, which, let’s be honest, is pretty much constant when traveling. After riding public transportation or in a cab, be sure to clean your hands with sanitizer. You don’t know who touched the handrails, doors or ticket machines before you.

>> Related: 10 ways to save money on gasoline during your summer travels

Carry sanitizing cloths

If you’re traveling by bus, airplane or train, be sure to wipe down your tray table and arm rests, as these places often harbor cold germs. In fact, airplane tray tables were recently found to be the most germ-filled surface on an airplane. Carry sanitizing cloths for wiping down surfaces as well as hand sanitizer.

>> Related: These 5 travel apps will help you find the best restaurants, WiFi and bathrooms in any city

Stay hydrated

Drinking water is especially important when flying. The combination of cabin pressure and dry, recirculated air in planes can rob your skin of moisture and lead to dehydration. Water will keep you naturally hydrated and feeling great for when you arrive at your final destination.

>> Related: These 5 tips will leave your skin glowing even after a long flight

Exercise, exercise, exercise

Not everyone wants to exercise on vacation, but dietitians recommend getting as much exercise as possible to keep you feeling great. Walking tours and bicycle rentals are great ways to not only learn about your destination, but to also burn calories in the process.

>> Related: 10 road trip tips for every traveler

Fight motion sickness

If you’re prone to bouts of motion sickness, your doctor may be willing to write you a prescription for promethazine, an anti-nausea medication used by NASA to fight space sickness and recommended by Dr. Joanne Feldman of UCLA’s Department of Emergency Medicine. Feldman is considered an expert in motion-sickness treatments.

9 healthy-sounding foods that have more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut

American Heart Association experts recommend men shouldn’t eat more than 36 grams of added sugar a day and women should limit their sugar consumption to 25 grams.

>> Read more trending stories  

So a single Krispy Kreme doughnut, which has 10 grams of sugar, takes up a good bulk of your recommended daily intake.

>> Shaquille O'Neal buys Krispy Kreme store

But healthy-sounding snack replacements like yogurt and raisins actually rack up more sugar than you might think. And several options even have more than double the sugar of a Krispy Kreme original glazed doughnut.

>> Related: National Doughnut Day 2017 deals and freebies 

Here are 11 foods and drinks with more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut:

To learn more about added sugars and your recommended intake, visit heart.org.

Is it better to wash your hands in cold or hot water? 

Do you always wash your hands in hot water? A new study suggests you can turn the heat down a notch because cleaning your hands in cold water is just as good. 

>> Read more trending news

Professors from Rutgers University-New Brunswick conducted an experiment to learn the most effective way to clean your hands. While many people assume warmer temperatures get rid of more germs, the researchers’ results proved that it’s a myth. 

Analysts gathered 20 volunteers, asking them to wash their hands, which were covered in bugs, 20 times each in 59-, 79- and 100-degree Fahrenheit water with varying amounts of soap.

»Related: How well are you cleaning the 10 filthiest places in your kitchen? 

They determined that there was no difference in the number of insects removed in each of the water temperatures or amounts of soap. 

»Related: Photos: The 10 germiest items in your home 

"People need to feel comfortable when they are washing their hands but as far as effectiveness [goes], this study shows us that the temperature of the water used did not matter," researcher Donald Schaffner said.

Although the scientists noted their study was small and more research was needed, they recommend people wash their hands for at least 20 seconds, using an adequate amount of soap to cover the entire surface. 

U.S. Alzheimer’s disease deaths up 55 percent, CDC says

An estimated 5.4 million Americans are affected by Alzheimer’s disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.

» RELATED: Alzheimer’s disease fueled by gut bacteria, new study finds 

According to a recent report from the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the death rate from the disease has risen by 55 percent in recent decades.

Experts collected data from death certificates and found that 93,541 Americans who died in 2014 had Alzheimer’s disease cited as the cause of death. That’s a rate of 25.4 deaths per 100,000 people.

>> Read more trending news

It’s a 54.5 percent increase since 1999, when the rate of Alzheimer’s disease deaths was 16.5 deaths per 100,000 people, according to the CDC.

» RELATED: How does Alzheimer's disease kill you? 

By 2050, experts estimate the number will jump to 13.8 million afflicted U.S. adults ages 65 and up.

The increase is due to multiple factors, including the growing population of older adults and increased reporting and diagnosis by physicians and medical examiners among others, according to the report.

While most U.S. Alzheimer’s disease deaths occurred in a nursing home or a long-term care facility, that number has dramatically declined since 1999, from 14.7 percent to 6.6 percent in 2014.

» RELATED: Living with Alzheimer’s disease and the fight to combat it 

Instead, more and more patients died at home instead of in medical facilities.About a quarter of Alzheimer’s patients in 2014 spent their last days at home compared to just 13.9 percent in 1999.

“Millions of Americans and their family members are profoundly affected by Alzheimer's disease,” CDC acting director Anne Schuchat said in a statement. “As the number of older Americans with Alzheimer's disease rises, more family members are taking on the emotionally and physically challenging role of caregiver than ever before.”

» RELATED: How to help Alzheimer’s patients enjoy life, not just ‘fade away’ 

In addition, patients, caregivers and publicly funded long-term care facilities bear significant financial and societal costs due to increasing rates of Alzheimer’s deaths.

Experts recommend more federal funding toward caregiver support and education and toward research to find a cure.

According to the CDC report, the U.S. is estimated to spend a total $259 billion in 2017 on care costs for those with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

» RELATED: Don’t go it alone when caring for a spouse with dementia 

And those caring for Alzheimer’s or dementia patients provided 18.2 billion hours of unpaid assistance in 2015.

“This is a tidal wave of Alzheimer's disease that is now upon us. We've been saying Baby Boomers are getting older and we have to be ready. Now it's here. It's here, and it's not going away unless we do something serious about it. Ultimately, we want to eradicate this disease. That is possible,” Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs at the Alzheimer’s Association, told CBS News.

Click here to read the full CDC Morbidity and Mortality report.

Tobacco use kills 7 million a year, poisons environment, WHO says

The World Health Organization is highlighting the dangers of tobacco use as one of the biggest public health threats in the world.

More than 7 million people die every year due to tobacco use, costing households and governments more than $1.4 trillion in health care costs and productivity loss, experts wrote in a news release Tuesday, the day before World No Tobacco Day.

In addition, tobacco waste contains more than 7,000 toxic chemicals that poison the environment and contributes to 16 percent of all noncommunicable disease deaths, the WHO said.

>> Read more trending news

The drug is a threat to livelihoods, too, according to the WHO. Around 860 million adult smokers live in either low- or middle-income countries, often spending more than 10 percent of their income on tobacco products and leaving less for things such as food, health care and education.

According to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S. with more than 480,000 reported deaths (nearly one in five deaths) each year and 16 million Americans suffering with at least one disease caused by smoking.

This costs the country nearly $170 billion in direct medical costs.

Nationwide, according to 2015 data, 31.4 percent of U.S. high school youth reported using a tobacco product, and 10.8 percent reported smoking cigarettes.

The CDC offers tips for smokers who want to quit, including a hotline for referrals to local resources (1-800-784-8669), best practices guidelines and more at CDC.gov.

More about the threat of tobacco use at WHO.int.

Neighbors help 5-year-old with rare disease celebrate Halloween in May

Family and friends are helping a sick boy celebrate a special Halloween-themed birthday in May.

>> Watch the news report here

Carter Sarkar of Castaic, California, outside Los Angeles, has Sanfilippo syndrome, a disorder that prevents the body from properly processing sugar. The disease will slowly cause Carter to lose his motor skills and brain function until his body eventually shuts down, likely during his teenage years, KTLA reports.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

On Sunday, Carter’s neighbors helped him celebrate his 5th birthday by allowing him to go door-to-door and trick-or-treat with his friends.

>> Read more trending news

“That’s why we go all-out for everything we do because you don’t know if he’s going to be here next year or if he’s going to be able to say ‘Mom’ or ‘Dad’ next year or his sisters, so you just have to live for today and hope for tomorrow with him,” said mom Jennifer Sarkar.

The family started a crowdfunding account to raise money in hopes of finding a cure for Sanfilippo syndrome. If you would like to donate, click here.

Doctor: Popular charcoal masks could cause permanent skin damage

A popular “do-it-yourself” charcoal mask that has been trending all over the internet could cause serious damage to your skin, according to a dermatologist.

"It might be dangerous if you like all three layers of your skin," Dr. Seth Forman, a dermatologist in Tampa, Florida, said in an interview with WFTS

Many people have taken to YouTube to show users the painful process of peeling off the charcoal mask. Many of these products are sold from “unregulated vendors,” WFTS reports. Forman said that some of these products are mixed with a foreign charcoal powder and super glue, and will “most likely” be illegal soon. 

If certain layers of skin are peeled off, it can lead to scarring and infection “especially when you get down to the second layer (of skin),” according to WFTS

The good news is that there is a large variety of FDA approved facial masks that are safe, Forman said.

WATCH: Young girl left temporarily paralyzed illustrates dangers of tick bites

A 3-year-old girl in Oregon awoke on May 13 to find herself unable to stand or use her arms.

>> Read more trending news 

Evelyn Lewis’ mother, Amanda Lewis, filmed her daughter’s failed attempts to stand with help from her husband. 

WGHP reported that the parents took Evelyn to the emergency room, where a doctor discovered a small but dangerous reason for her condition.

After combing through Evelyn’s hair, the doctor discovered a tick, diagnosing her with a condition called “tick paralysis.”

“The doctor talked to us for a minute and said over the past 15 years he had seen about seven or eight children her age with identical symptoms and more than likely she had a tick,” Amanda Lewis wrote on Facebook. “It can affect dogs also and can be fatal. I’m glad we took her in when we did and that it wasn’t something worse and that we found it before it got worse.”

According to the American Lyme Disease Foundation, tick paralysis attacks a person’s muscles and results in symptoms like muscle pains and numbness of the legs. These begin after a tick has attached itself to a host, generally on the scalp.

>> Related: Rare tick-borne illness worries some medical professionals

Fortunately, Evelyn is now doing much better, as her mother wrote on Facebook that she “is now pretty much completely back to her feisty little self. She complains a lot about her head itching but otherwise, she’s just fine.”

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