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Is feeding a cold a real thing? 5 winter health myths debunked

You've probably heard winter health myths for years and you may have even accepted some of them as fact.

From being told to bundle up, so you don't catch a cold to your neighbor swearing he got the flu from his flu shot, these myths make the rounds every winter.

Breathe easy: 5 household plants that improve air quality

We separate fact from fiction with the following five winter health myths:

Cold weather can make you get sick.

Mom always warned you you'd get sick if you didn't bundle up before heading out in cold weather. Her advice wasn't exactly horrible, since you'll certainly be more comfortable and protected from frostbite. But cold by itself doesn't make you more likely to get sick, according to The Weather Channel. Most experts think we're more likely to get sick in colder months, but that's because we're all cooped up together, exchanging germs. Cold weather also dries out your nasal passages, reducing their ability to filter out infections. Despite evidence to the contrary, moms will probably keep warning their kids to bundle up. It's what they do.

>> Read more trending news 

You lose 90 percent of your body heat through your head.

Of all your body parts, your head is more likely to be exposed in cold weather. But that doesn't mean the myth about losing 90 percent of your body heat through your head is true, according to Business Insider. Sure, wearing a hat in cold weather will help you stay warm, but that's just because you're covering an exposed body part, not because there's anything special about your head. You could cover up any other exposed body part and also feel warmer.

You don't need sunscreen in the winter.

If you think you only need sunscreen in hotter weather, you've probably packed your lotion away by the time winter comes around. But even when the weather's overcast in the winter, up to 80 percent of the sun's rays can still penetrate the clouds, according to Reader's digest.

UVA rays are always present - even in winter - and they can damage the deeper layers of your skin, increasing your risk for skin cancer and causing premature aging of your skin. And if you're planning a ski trip, you should be even more careful. UV radiation increases with elevation, and snow reflects and intensifies sunlight. So whatever the season, wearing sunscreen with at least a 30 SPF is the safest way to go.

Feed a cold, starve a fever.

The origin of this myth may be rooted in antiquated beliefs about colds and fevers, according to CNN. It was once believed that your body literally became colder if you had a cold, so it needed to be "warmed up" with food. Fever was thought to need "cooling down" by not eating.

In reality, you need to eat whether you have a cold or a fever. Good, nutritious foods are important, but it's OK if your illness suppresses your appetite a little. Staying hydrated is most important, especially if you have a fever. You may need to replenish electrolytes, so sports drinks can be a good choice. Good ol' chicken soup will keep you hydrated while also helping to clear your nasal passages.

RELATED: Your guide to an (almost) allergy-free home

The flu shot can give you the flu.

This isn't true, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC). Flu shots are made with either an inactive form of the virus or no flu virus at all. Neither type can give you the flu. You may have a sore arm after getting a flu shot and some people report having a low-grade fever and aches for a day or two, but it's not the flu.

On the other hand, you may still get the flu even if you've had a flu shot, but the odds of getting it are much lower and, if you do get the flu, the symptoms will likely be less severe.

WATCH: Meteor spotted in Ohio, Michigan, Canada

The fireball lit up the sky just after 8 p.m. Tuesday.

>> Click here to watch

The dashboard cam video was shared by Mike Austin as he was driving north on I-75 near Bloomfield Hills, north of Detroit, Michigan. 

>> On WHIO.com: 2017 fireball caught on WHIO-TV weather camera

The fireball also was seen from northwest Ohio and southwest Ontario, Canada

>> Read more trending news 

It is not known whether the meteorite dissipated in the atmosphere or made it to the ground or into Lake Michigan.

White Castle will offer romantic Valentine’s Day package, reservations again

Fast food icon White Castle once again will offer its romantic Valentine’s Day package for those in love, but on a budget.

White Castle is now accepting reservations for its annual Valentine’s Day Dinner and for the first time, the chain is using OpenTable.com, or the reservation app, to allow diners to secure their spot for the traditional dinner with a twist, Cincinnati.com reported.

>> Read more trending news 

This year, like in years past, White Castle will offer its original slider and veggie slider.  To throw love into the meal, it’s also serving up a chocolate-covered strawberry smoothie, a combination of strawberries and vanilla yogurt that is topped with Ghirardelli chocolate sauce. It will also decorate the locations in red and pink balloons, throw tablecloths on the tables and give menus to its guests, Delish reported.

To make a reservation, either use OpenTable or you can call the local numbers listed here.

Eagles guitarist Glenn Frey's widow files wrongful death lawsuit against New York hospital

The widow of late Eagles guitarist Glenn Frey is suing the New York City hospital that treated her husband before his death in 2016.

According to Reuters, Cindy Frey filed a lawsuit Tuesday accusing Mount Sinai Hospital and gastroenterologist Steven Itzkowitz of negligence while treating the musician, who had ulcerative colitis, in late 2015.

>> Read more trending news 

The wrongful death lawsuit alleges that "Frey was rendered sick, sore, lame and disabled" because Itzkowitz and the hospital did not properly diagnose, treat or disclose the risks of treatment to him, Reuters reported.

Frey died Jan. 18, 2016, after suffering "complications from rheumatoid arthritis, acute ulcerative colitis and pneumonia," the band said in a statement at the time. He was 67.

Eagles manager Irving Azoff previously told The Wrap that rheumatoid arthritis medications were partly to blame for Frey's death.

“The colitis and pneumonia were side effects from all the meds,” Azoff said

Cindy Frey is seeking "unspecified damages," Reuters reported.

Read more here.

Flu outbreak forces an entire school district in Oklahoma to cancel classes for rest of week

An entire Oklahoma school district canceled classes Wednesday through Friday after schools reported excessive flu absences among much of the staff.

>> Read more trending news 

Morris Public Schools said Monday's absences were at 20 percent, and Tuesday's were at more than 30 percent.

Basketball teams will continue competition in the county tournament.

Wrestlers will need to contact the coach about scheduled meets.

The district asks that ill students stay home when school resumes.

CDC cancels nuclear disaster talk, focus switches to flu outbreak

Three days after a false report of a missile attack on Hawaii seemed the perfect time to help the public for a nuclear disaster. But instead, the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed the top of Tuesday’s discussion to the flu epidemic

The CDC did not immediately respond to questions surrounding the topic change for the public health discussion, which had been planned for several weeks. 

RELATED: CDC prepares for nuclear attack

The CDC says the previous event, titled “Public Health Response to a Nuclear Detonation,” will be held at a future date. The session will focus on local, state and federal preparations in the event of a nuclear attack. 

>> Read more trending news 

“While a nuclear detonation is unlikely, it would have devastating results and there would be limited time to take critical protection steps,” the CDC said before the event was changed. “Despite the fear surrounding such an event, planning and preparation can lessen deaths and illness. For instance, most people don’t realize that sheltering in place for at least 24 hours is crucial to saving lives and reducing exposure to radiation.”

Warning: Travelers through Chicago O’Hare International Airport may have been exposed to measles

Anyone who traveled through Chicago O’Hare International Airport earlier this month may want to check for signs of measles.

The Illinois Department of Health issued an alert that a passenger on board an international flight that landed on Jan. 10 tested positive for the disease.

The department has not released what flights the person was on, or where they traveled to or from.

>> Read more trending news 

The unnamed passenger arrived at Terminal 5 and left via a domestic flight from Terminal 1, but may have been in other areas of the airport.

The person was infectious that day, according to Health Department officials.

Officials are most concerned about people who were at the airport between 6:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. local time on Jan. 10, especially those who have not been vaccinated.

The Department of Health says that those exposed, and who have contracted measles, could see symptoms as late as Jan. 31.

Symptoms include: 

  • Rash
  • High fever
  • Cough
  • Runny nose
  • Red, watery eyes

Health Department officials say if you experience the symptoms, call a doctor before going to an office or emergency room so precautions can be taken to protect other patients from possible exposure since measles is highly contagious and can be spread through the air when someone either coughs or sneezes.

WGN reported that there is no risk for travelers currently using O’Hare. The Health Department told the television station, “If you weren’t at O’Hare on Jan. 10 there’s no concern. Even if you were, the risk was very, very low, and ... if you’ve been vaccinated it’s next to nothing.”

Mary B's frozen biscuits recalled due to listeria concerns

Be sure to check your freezer because there’s a new recall on frozen biscuits that were sold in nearly two dozen states.

>> Biscuits recalled over listeria concern

Hom/Ade Foods is recalling Mary B’s brand biscuits due to listeria concerns. The biscuits were sold in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

>> Read more trending news 

Company officials said the problem was discovered in a product sampling conducted by an outside company that manufactured the product.

Listeria can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, elderly people and others with weakened immune systems.

The Mary B’s products affected are frozen bagged biscuits. All have “Best If Used By" dates before Sept. 23, 2018, and with the letter “M” immediately after the date.

UPC codes affected by the recall:

  • 2059300007 MARY B’S JUMBO BUTTERMILK BISCUITS 35OZ 10 / 3.5OZ
  • 2059300015 MARY B’S BUTTERMILK BISCUITS 26.4OZ 12 / 2.2OZ
  • 2059300018 MARY B’S SOUTHERNMADE BISCUITS 26.4OZ 12 / 2.2OZ
  • 2059300020 MARY B’S BUTTERMILK VALUE PACK BISCUITS 44OZ 20 / 2.2OZ
  • 2059300021 MARY B’S SOUTHERNMADE VALUE PACK BISCUITS 44OZ 20 / 2.2OZ
  • 2059300022 MARY B’s BUTTERMILK TEA BISCUITS 24OZ 24 / 1OZ
  • 2059300023 MARY B’S BUTTERTASTE VALUE PACK BISCUITS 44OZ 20 / 2.2OZ
  • 2059300028 MARY B’S THIN BUTTERMILK BISCUITS 28.6OZ 22 / 1.3OZ
  • 2059300033 MARY B’S BUTTERMILK FAMILY PACK BISCUITS 60OZ 30 / 2OZ
  • 2059300034 MARY B’S SOUTHERNMADE FAMILY PACK BISCUITS 60OZ 30 / 2OZ
  • 2059300035 MARY B’S BUTTERTASTE FAMILY PACK BISCUITS 60OZ 30 / 2OZ
  • 2059383000 MARY B’S BUTTERMILK 0 TRANS FAT 220CT BULK BISCUITS 220 / 2.2OZ
  • 2059383004 MARY B’S BUTTERMILK BISCUITS 220CT BULK BISCUITS 220 / 2.2OZ
  • 2059387000 MARY B’S MADE WITH WHOLE GRAIN 220CT BULK BISCUITS 220 / 2.2OZ
  • 3059320583 MARY B’S 3.5 OZ JUMBO BUTTERMILK 144CT BULK BISCUITS 144 / 3.5OZ

Customers are urged to return affected products to the store for a full refund.

Read more here.

WATCH: Firefighter catches child thrown from burning building

Incredible video captured firefighters rescuing a child from a burning building in DeKalb County, Georgia.

>> Click here to watch

The helmet camera video, posted by DeKalb County Fire and Rescue, was taken at the Avondale Forest Apartments on Jan. 3.

The video shows a person on top of a ladder drop a child down to a firefighter as the flames roar around them.

The firefighter catches the child and quickly runs to safety. 

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

"Third-generation DCFR firefighter Capt. Scott Stroup can be seen catching one of the children that was dropped from the third-floor balcony. Great job by all hands operating on this fire as several lifesaving grabs were made that night," the department posted on Facebook.

An estimated 50 people were left without a place to live after the massive fire at the Decatur apartment complex.

Capt. Eric Jackson, with DeKalb County Fire and Rescue, told WSB-TV that four adults and eight children were hurt in the fire.

>> Read more trending news 

He said their injuries were minor and mostly related to smoke inhalation.

Firefighters kicked in doors and ushered out residents when they arrived on the scene, Jackson said. 

One of the victims told WSB-TV's Steve Gehlbach hearing the screams coming from the people trapped was the most frightening part of the fire for them.

“Jumping out of the building. Jumping out of their balconies. Someone said they threw their baby outside and fireman caught the baby,” they said.

Experts: Parents feed babies solid food too soon

Are Americans feeding their babies solid foods too early?

One group of child-feeding advocates say yes and that the move to feed babies solids early can follow them for the rest of their lives.

>> Read more trending news 

The group, called thousanddays.org, examined nutrition for babies in America.

Thousand days refers to pregnancy through the first two years after birth.

Its research found that nearly 40 percent of parents are introducing solids too early and that only 22 percent of babies are exclusively breastfed for six months.

Thousanddays.org said that more than half of moms say they are getting mixed messages on what to feed their babies.

So what are parents feeding their children and when?

Chloe Barrera with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevents said that she oversaw a study that took a look at what 1,482 babies from the age of 6 to 36 months ate. Parents told researchers when they first ate food that wasn’t formula or breast milk. Other foods included juice, cow’s milk, baby food or other solids. About two-thirds of families were not following official recommendations. Some parents introduced foods too early, or before 4 months (16.3 percent) , many (38.3 percent) gave food to their babies between 4 and 5 months, while some held off solid foods until 7 or more months (12.9 percent), Huffington Post reported.

Barrera’s study was published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

But study authors say the numbers may be worse than reported since research depended upon self-reporting and that parents who know the recommendations may have under-reported the ages of their children and when they fed them solid foods, Huffington Post reported.

Experts say babies should be either breast fed or fed for their first 6 months because those foods have the nutrients babies need for development. 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services are both working on federal guidelines for children under 2 years old. The guidelines are expected to be released in 2020, Huffington Post reported.

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