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Katy Perry says she 'prayed the gay away' as a youth

Katy Perry says she "prayed the gay away" during her "unconscious adolescence."

The 32-year-old singer opened up about her sexuality and praised the gay community while receiving an award from the Human Rights Campaign on Saturday in Los Angeles.

Perry was born into a fundamentalist Christian family, but says she was curious about sexuality and knew it wasn't a black-and-white issue. She referenced one of her biggest hits in telling the group "I kissed a girl and I liked it." She added that she also "did more than that." She says she "prayed the gay away" at Christian camps, but later met people outside of her "bubble."

She says without people in her life from the LGBTQ community she'd be "half of the person I am today."

She's 100! Britain marks singer Vera Lynn's landmark day

Britain has taken a nostalgic trip into the past to celebrate the 100th birthday of patriotic songstress Vera Lynn by projecting her image onto the white cliffs of Dover.

The unusual tribute Monday is a reference to her World War II classic "(There'll be Bluebirds Over) the White Cliffs of Dover."

Lynn was known as the "Forces Sweetheart" for her optimistic wartime anthems, including "We'll Meet Again."

"As we look to the white cliffs on Monday, I will be thinking of all our brave boys," she said. "The cliffs were the last thing they saw before heading off to war and, for those fortunate enough to return, the first thing they saw upon returning home."

Like all Britons who reach 100, Lynn will receive congratulations from Queen Elizabeth II.

Wife: Glen Campbell can no longer play guitar

Glen Campbell's wife says Alzheimer's disease has robbed the 80-year-old singer's ability to play guitar.

But Kim Campbell tells The Tennessean (http://tnne.ws/2mgkkRQ ) that her husband occasionally breaks into a solo air guitar routine, which she says is "kind of fun."

Glen Campbell was diagnosed with the brain-ravaging disease in 2011 and went on a world tour afterward. The singer known for such hits as "Rhinestone Cowboy," ''Wichita Lineman" and "Southern Nights" was moved to a long-term care facility in 2014.

Kim Campbell says he continues to sing, although the words are gibberish and "it's not a melody that we recognize, but you can tell that it's a happy song and he has a song in his heart," so that brings her great comfort.

Friend: Chuck Berry's 1st album in decades is 'sensational'

Joe Edwards, the owner of the Blueberry Hill club in St. Louis where Berry performed regularly, said the tracks he has heard off the upcoming album, titled "CHUCK," are "sensational."

"What a genius," Edwards said Saturday. "I just miss him like crazy. I miss his laugh."

While studios often release tribute albums of classics or unused material after an artist dies, Berry's upcoming album featuring mostly original songs was announced in October. His last new studio album, "Rock It," was released in 1979.

The 90-year-old Berry died Saturday at his home near St. Louis. Berry's classic songs "Johnny B. Goode" and "Roll Over Beethoven" echoed throughout The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame on Sunday as it paid tribute to the musician.

"Anybody who's picked up a guitar has been influenced by him," said rock hall CEO Greg Harris, who remembers playing the opening riff of "Johnny B. Goode" over and over again as budding teen guitarist.

In addition to Berry's notes, Harris said his lyrics spoke about teenage life and social issues in the 1950s.

"It's why when we think of the greats and the forefathers, his name is right there," Harris said.

Berry drew praise all corners after his death including a tweet from former President Barack Obama.

"Chuck Berry rolled over everyone who came before him - and turned up everyone who came after. We'll miss you, Chuck. Be good," Obama wrote.

Berry was the first artist in the inaugural 1986 class to go into the rock hall, and he closed out its concert in 1995 to celebrate the building's opening in Cleveland. The Rolling Stones' Keith Richards said at Berry's induction ceremony that Berry was the one who started it all.

Funeral arrangements hadn't been announced Sunday. One of Berry's representatives, Matt Hanks, said he didn't have any new information about the release plans for the "Chuck" album.

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Associated Press writers Greg McCune in Chicago and John Seewer in Toledo, Ohio, contributed to this report.

Chuck Berry's spirit lives on through countless songs

Behind so many great rock bands and rock songs looms the music of Chuck Berry.

Like the time a teenage Keith Richards ran into a childhood friend, Mick Jagger, at a train station in England and discovered they were musical soul mates.

"You know I was keen on Chuck Berry and I thought I was the only fan for miles," Richards wrote to a relative in April 1962. "I was holding one of Chuck's records when a guy I knew at primary school ... came up to me. He's got every Chuck Berry ever made and all his mates have, too."

Berry died Saturday at age 90, leaving behind not only a core of rock classics such as "Johnny B. Goode" and "Roll Over Beethoven," but countless descendants in songs clearly indebted to him in sound and in spirit.

You could assemble a heavenly mix tape just of the hits built around his guitar work. You can hear it overtly in the Rolling Stones' "Brown Sugar," which closes with a near-verbatim homage to "Johnny B. Goode," in Bob Seger's "Get Out of Denver" and the Beach Boys' "Fun, Fun, Fun," or in brief passages to songs that might not otherwise remind anyone of Berry, like the Eagles' "Peaceful Easy Feeling" or the Who's "Who are You."

"It started with Chuck Berry. He inspired us all," tweeted Rod Stewart, whose Berry-influenced songs included "Hot Legs" and "Stay With Me," a hit when he was with the Faces. "The 1st album I bought was Chuck's 'Live at the Tivoli' and I was never the same."

Berry also patented an animated, stream of consciousness storytelling style that artists have been using ever since. Listen to Bob Dylan unfurl his story of paranoia in "Subterranean Homesick Blues" or his old man's boast in "Thunder On the Mountain," or the Rolling Stones' mockery in "Respectable," songs inconceivable without Berry's "Maybellene" and "Too Much Monkey Business" among others. Berry's rocking groove and comic spirit inspire Creedence Clearwater Revival's sci-fi "It Came Out of the Sky," while Seger's "Rock and Roll Never Forgets" consciously brings Berry's teen world into adult life.

__

So now sweet 16's turned 31

You get to feelin' weary when the workday's done

Well all you got to do is get up and into your kicks

If you're in a fix

Come back baby, rock and roll never forgets

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Critic Peter Guralnick notes that Berry's influence is both literal, in the way Richards might consciously imitate one of his riffs, and more general in his poetry and novelistic detail. The Cadillac in Berry's "Nadine" is not just a Cadillac, but a "coffee colored" Cadillac. He says one of Dylan's great accomplishments was absorbing Berry's gifts into his own style.

"Dylan called Berry the 'Shakespeare of rock n' roll' and with good reason," Guralnick said Sunday. "Had the Nobel committee been open to popular musicians before Dylan's era, they might have given the prize to Berry."

Berry didn't just create the music for so many rock n' roll lives but helped invent the characters — the bored student, the groupie, the would-be guitar hero — and placed them in an American landscape of restlessness, aspiration and motion. The simple pleasure, and underlying boredom, of The Beach Boys' "I Get Around" were the suburban Californians' take on Berry's "No Particular Place to Go." Springsteen's "Born to Run" is rock romance and adventure in the grandest Berry style.

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In the day we sweat it out on the streets of a runaway American dream

At night we ride through mansions of glory in suicide machines

Sprung from cages on Highway 9

Chrome-wheeled, fuel-injected

And steppin' out over the line

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Up ahead, and moving along, was Berry and the Garden State adventures of "You Can't Catch Me":

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New Jersey Turnpike in the wee wee hours

I was rollin' slowly 'cause of drizzlin' showers

Here come a flat-top, he was movin' up with me

Then come wavin' by me in a little' old souped-up jitney

I put my foot on my tank and I began to roll

Key dates in the life of rock 'n' roll visionary Chuck Berry

—Oct. 18, 1926: Born Charles Edward Anderson Berry in St. Louis.

—Oct. 28, 1948: Marries Themetta Suggs with whom he has four children.

—Dec. 31, 1952: Needing a replacement for an ailing musician for a New Year's Eve show, pianist/bandleader Johnnie Johnson calls acquaintance Berry.

—May 1, 1955: Berry signs with Chess Records.

—May 21, 1955: Berry records "Maybellene," his version of "Ida Red."

—Aug. 1, 1955: "Maybellene" reaches No. 5 on Billboard's Best Sellers chart, goes on to top R&B chart.

—June 30, 1956: Berry's "Roll Over Beethoven" hits No. 2 on the R&B chart, No. 29 on pop chart.

—May 1957: Berry's first album, "After School Session," released; single "School Day" reaches No. 3 on pop chart.

—Feb. 24, 1958: Berry's "Sweet Little Sixteen" released. Weeks later, reaches No. 2 on Billboard's pop chart and tops the R&B chart.

—June 14, 1958: "Johnny B. Goode," his tribute to Johnson, makes the Top Ten.

—1962: Convicted of transporting a minor girl across state lines.

—June 1, 1966: Berry leaves Chess for Mercury Records. Re-signs with Chess in 1970.

—May 1, 1972: "The London Chuck Berry Sessions" released, including novelty song "My Ding-a-Ling." Album becomes Berry's best seller, reaching No. 8 on the Billboard chart.

—1973: Johnson leaves Berry's band.

—June 1, 1979: Berry performs at White House at President Carter's request, months before serving several months in prison on tax evasion.

—Feb. 26, 1985: Berry given Lifetime Achievement Award at annual Grammy Awards.

—Jan. 23, 1986: Berry inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

—1987: Release of "Hail! Hail! Rock 'n' Roll," the documentary of the Fox Theatre concert in St. Louis to celebrate Berry's 60th birthday.

—1988, 1989: Berry sued for allegedly punching a woman in New York and later for allegedly videotaping women secretly while they were using the restroom at his St. Louis-area restaurant.

—1996: Berry begins performing monthly at Blueberry Hill's Duck Room in St. Louis.

—November 2000: Berry sued by Johnnie Johnson, who seeks share of royalties on songs he co-wrote with Berry but were credited to Berry alone.

—April 13, 2005: Johnnie Johnson dies following dismissal of lawsuit, resumption of his and Berry's friendship, and a few more concerts together at Blueberry Hill.

—Oct. 18. 2016: Berry announces on his 90th birthday that he plans to release his first album since 1979, called "Chuck," sometime in 2017. A specific release date isn't set.

—March 18, 2017: Berry dies at his home in suburban St. Louis.

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Source: Interviews and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Cleveland.

Quotes about rock 'n' roll visionary Chuck Berry

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"If rock 'n' roll has a patron saint, it is — arguably — not Elvis or Little Richard or Jerry Lee Lewis but Chuck Berry. While he may not have created rock 'n' roll with 'Maybelline,' his first recording in 1955, with it and the string of hits that followed, he introduced melodies and rhythms that became an essential part of the music. Moreover, Berry codified the genre, defining its subject matter: cars and the open road; boys and guitars; girls sought after, lost and, occasionally, won; the urge towards freedom from parents and other authority." — The Washington Post, 1987.

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"What an amazing thing it must have been to see Berry for the first time, with his pencil-thin mustache and elaborately curled hair, his full drape jacket and tight slacks, take his guitar (slung at crotch level, as all the rhythm-and-blues guitarists had been doing...), point it at a right angle to his body, and, while he played a tricky but repetitive riff, execute a strange walk across the Paramount stage, bobbing his head and squatting, looking for all the world like a duck!" — "Rock of Ages: The Rolling Stone History of Rock & Roll."

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"From the (Beatles') earliest efforts, Chuck Berry songs had been a staple of their repertoire. John always considered Berry 'one of the all-time great poets, a rock poet .... I've loved everything he's done, ever.'" — "The Beatles: The Biography," by Bob Spitz.

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"The villain of the evening was the influence of rock 'n' roll. ... Another singer, Chuck Berry, reduced the (Newport Jazz) festival to a tawdry low point with a group of outright rock 'n' roll selections. There was no more reason to have Mr. Berry at a jazz festival than there would, to go to the opposite extreme, to have Mantovani." — New York Times, July 1958. (Berry's appearance was immortalized in the acclaimed documentary "Jazz on a Summer's Day.")

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"Of all the early breakthrough rock 'n' roll artists, none is more important to the development of the music than Chuck Berry. He is its greatest songwriter, the main shaper of its instrumental voice, one of its greatest guitarists, and one of its greatest performers. Quite simply, without him, there would be no Beatles, Rolling Stones, Beach Boys, Bob Dylan, nor a myriad others." — Cub Koda, "All Music Guide to Rock."

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To this day, the cream of Berry's repertoire — which includes 'Johnny B. Goode,' 'Sweet Little Sixteen,' 'Rock and Roll Music' and 'Roll Over Beethoven' — is required listening for any serious rock fan and required learning for any serious rock musician." — Citation from Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, 1986.

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"Adapting Louis Jordan's jump blues for electrified instruments, Berry created the definitive architecture for the rock and roll band, and shifted the spotlight to the guitar. Most significant was Berry's writing, which placed country-style storytelling in a youth-oriented context that perfectly captured the lives, thoughts and dreams of baby boomer teens." — Time magazine; the All-TIME 100 Albums.

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"All the Chuck Berry songs you ever heard always had things like 'Birmingham, Alabama!' shouted out, these American places like 'Tallahassee!' But you couldn't put the English ones in. It always sounded daft to us. 'Scunthorpe!' 'Warrington!' It doesn't sound as funky." — Paul McCartney in "Rock Lives: Profiles and Interviews," by Timothy White.

Teen born without a jaw finds his voice, achieves dream of creating music

A teen born without a jaw is beating the odds again, launching a music career and helping other along the way.

When Isaiah Acosta was born, the odds were stacked against him. He’s now 17 years old and thriving in Phoenix, Arizona.

>> Read more trending news

Though he’s considered mute and will never have the ability to speak, Isaiah is now launching his music career.

“We knew we had a great story but we didn’t know it was going to explode like it did,” Tarah Acosta, Isaiah’s mother, told KNXV.

Last week, Isaiah’s hip-hop song “Oxygen to Fly” debuted. He partnered with Arizona rapper Trap House and a short documentary featuring his story was shared online. In just a few days, his story racked up more than 4 million views.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

“I don’t even think Isaiah thought this was possible. You know he is mute and we and a lot of people have told us they haven’t seen anything like this,” said Tarah.

You can listen to Isaiah’s song by clicking here. All proceeds from the song will go to the Children’s Miracle Network.

>> Watch a video about Isaiah here

Chuck Berry's influence on rock 'n roll was incalculable

Along with James Dean and J.D. Salinger and a handful of others in the 1950s, Chuck Berry — who was 90 when he died Saturday at his suburban St. Louis home — helped define the modern teenager. While Elvis Presley gave rock n' roll its libidinous, hip-shaking image, Berry was the auteur, setting the narrative for a generation no longer weighed down by hardship or war. Well before the rise of Bob Dylan, Berry wedded social commentary to the beat and rush of popular music.

"He was singing good lyrics, and intelligent lyrics, in the '50s when other people were singing, 'Oh, baby, I love you so,'" John Lennon once observed.

"Classic rock" begins with Chuck Berry, who had announced late last year that he would first new album since 1979, called "Chuck," sometime this year. His core repertoire was some three dozen songs, but his influence was incalculable, from the Beatles and Rolling Stones to virtually every garage band or arena act that called itself rock 'n roll.

In his late 20s before his first major hit, Berry crafted lyrics that spoke to young people of the day and remained fresh decades later. "Sweet Little Sixteen" captured rock 'n' roll fandom, an early and innocent ode to the young girls later known as "groupies." ''School Day" told of the sing-song trials of the classroom ("American history and practical math; you're studying hard, hoping to pass ...") and the liberation of rock 'n' roll once the day's final bell rang.

"Roll Over Beethoven" was an anthem to rock's history-making power, while "Rock and Roll Music" was a guidebook for all bands that followed ("It's got a back beat, you can't lose it"). "Back in the U.S.A." was a black man's straight-faced tribute to his country, at a time there was no guarantee Berry would be served at the drive-ins and corner cafes he was celebrating.

"Everything I wrote about wasn't about me, but about the people listening," he once said.

"Johnny B. Goode," the tale of a guitar-playing country boy whose mother tells him he'll be a star, was Berry's signature song, the archetypal narrative for would-be rockers and among the most ecstatic recordings in the music's history. Berry can hardly contain himself as the words hurry out ("Deep down Louisiana close to New Orleans/Way back up in the woods among the evergreens") and the downpour of guitar, drums and keyboards amplifies every call of "Go, Johnny Go!"

The song was inspired in part by Johnnie Johnson, the boogie-woogie piano man who collaborated on many Berry hits, but the story could have easily been Berry's, Presley's or countless others'. Commercial calculation made the song universal: Berry had meant to call Johnny a "colored boy," but changed "colored" to "country," enabling not only radio play, but musicians of any color to imagine themselves as stars.

"Chances are you have talent," Berry later wrote of the song. "But will the name and the light come to you? No! You have to go!"

Johnny B. Goode could only have been a guitarist. The guitar was rock 'n' roll's signature instrument and Berry the first guitar hero. His clarion sound, a melting pot of country flash and rhythm 'n blues drive, turned on at least a generation of musicians, among them the Stones' Keith Richards, who once acknowledged he had "lifted every lick" from Berry; the Beatles' George Harrison; Bruce Springsteen; and the Who's Pete Townshend.

When NASA launched the unmanned Voyager I in 1977, an album was stored on the craft that would explain music on Earth to extraterrestrials. The one rock song included was "Johnny B. Goode."

Country, pop and rock artists have recorded Berry songs, including the Beatles ("Roll Over Beethoven"), Emmylou Harris ("You Never Can Tell"), Buck Owens ("Johnny B. Goode") and AC/DC ("School Days"). The Rolling Stones' first single was a cover of Berry's "Come On" and they went on to perform and record "Around and Around," ''Let it Rock" and others. Berry riffs pop up in countless songs, from the Stones' ravenous "Brown Sugar" to the Eagles' mellow country-rock ballad "Peaceful Easy Feeling."

Some stars covered him too well. The Beach Boys borrowed the melody of "Sweet Little Sixteen" for their surf anthem "Surfin' U.S.A." without initially crediting Berry. The Beatles' "Come Together," written by Lennon, was close enough to Berry's "You Can't Catch Me" to inspire a lawsuit by music publisher Morris Levy. In an out of court settlement, Lennon agreed to record "You Can't Catch Me" for his 1975 "Rock n' Roll" album.

Berry himself was accused of theft. In 2000, Johnson sued Berry over royalties and credit he believed he was due for the songs they composed together over more than 20 years of collaboration. The lawsuit was dismissed two years later, but Richards was among those who believed Johnson had been cheated, writing in his memoir "Life" that Johnson set up the arrangements for Berry and was so essential to the music that many of Berry's songs were recorded in keys more suited for the piano.

He received a Grammy for lifetime achievement in 1984 and two years later became a charter member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, along with Presley, Buddy Holly, Little Richard and others. In the 1990s, Berry began giving monthly concerts in the intimate setting of the "Duck Room" of the Blueberry Hill club in St. Louis, drawing visitors from around the world. At times he was joined by his son, guitarist Charles Berry Jr., and daughter, Ingrid Berry Clay, on vocals and harmonica. He married their mother, Themetta Suggs, in 1948. They had four children.

Charles Edward Anderson Berry was born in St. Louis on Oct. 18, 1926. As a child he practiced a bent-leg stride that enabled him to slip under tables, a prelude to the trademark "duck walk" of his adult years. His mother, like Johnny B. Goode's, told him he would make it, and make it big.

Berry studied the mechanics of music and how it was transmitted. As a teenager, he loved to take radios apart and put them back together. Using a Nick Manoloff guitar chord book, he learned how to play the hits of the time. He was fascinated by chord progressions and rhythms, discovering that many songs borrowed heavily from the Gershwins' "I Got Rhythm."

He began his musical career at age 15 when he went on stage at a high school review to perform a cover of Jay McShann's "Confessin' the Blues." Berry would never forget the ovation he received.

"Long did the encouragement of that performance assist me in programming my songs and even their delivery while performing," he wrote in "Chuck Berry," a memoir published in 1986. "I added and deleted according to the audiences' response to different gestures, and chose songs to build an act that would constantly stimulate my audience."

Influenced by bandleader Louis Jordan and blues guitarist T-Bone Walker among others, hip to country music, novelty songs and the emerging teen audiences of the post-World War II era, Berry signed with Chicago's Chess Records in 1955 after hooking up with Johnson three years earlier. "Maybellene" reworked the country song "Ida Red" and rose into the top 10 of the national pop charts, a rare achievement for a black artist at that time. According to Berry, label owner Leonard Chess was taken by the novelty of a "hillbilly song sung by a black man," an inversion of Presley's covers of blues songs.

Several hits followed, including "Roll Over Beethoven," ''School Day" and "Sweet Little Sixteen." Among his other songs: "Memphis," ''Nadine," ''Let it Rock," ''Almost Grown" and the racy novelty number "My Ding-A-Ling," which topped the charts in 1972, his only No. 1 single.

Berry didn't care for hard drugs and spoke of drinking screwdrivers "without the driver." But he knew too well the outlaw life.

His troubles began in 1944, when a joy riding trip to Kansas City turned into a crime spree involving armed robberies and car theft. Berry served three years of a 10-year sentence at a reformatory.

In the early 1960s, his career was nearly destroyed when he was indicted for violating the Mann Act, which barred transportation of a minor across state lines for "immoral purposes." There were two trials: the first so racist that a guilty verdict was vacated, and the second leading to prison time, 1 1/2 years of a three-year term. Berry continued to record after getting out, and his legacy was duly honored by the Beatles and the Stones, but his hit-making days were essentially over.

"Down from stardom/then I fell/to this lowly prison cell," Berry wrote in his journal as his jail time began.

Tax charges came in 1979, based on Berry's insistence he receive concert fees in cash, and another three-year prison sentence, all but 120 days of which was suspended. Some former female employees sued him for allegedly videotaping them in the bathroom of his restaurant. The cases were settled in 1994, after Berry paid $1.3 million.

Openly money-minded, Berry was an entrepreneur with a St. Louis nightclub and, west of the city, property he dubbed Berry Park, which included a home, guitar-shaped swimming pool, restaurant, cottages and concert venue. He declined to have a regular band and instead used local musicians, willing to work cheap, wherever he performed. Springsteen was among those who had an early gig backing Berry.

Berry and his duck walk were seen in several teen exploitation flicks of the '50s. In the 1980s, Richards organized the well-received documentary "Hail! Hail! Rock 'n' Roll," featuring highlights from concerts at St. Louis' Fox Theatre to celebrate Berry's 60th birthday that included Eric Clapton, Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis, who recalled being told by his own mother that Berry, not he, was the true king of rock 'n' roll.

Burned by an industry that demanded a share of his songwriting credits, Berry was deeply suspicious of even his admirers, as anybody could tell from watching him give Richards the business in "Hail! Hail! Rock 'n' Roll." For the movie's concerts, he confounded Richards by playing songs in different keys and tempos than they had been in rehearsal. Richards would recall turning to his fellow musicians and shrugging, "Wing it, boys."

Berry also was the subject of countless essays and histories of rock music, but he was his own best biographer. In "Go, Go, Go," one of many songs to feature Johnny B. Goode, he celebrates his magic on stage, an act irresistible to young and old, boy and girl, dog and cat.

Duckwalkin' on his knees, peckin' like a hen

Lookin' like a locomotive, here he comes again

Meow said the kitty, puppy bow, wow, wow

Go and pick your guitar, Johnny don't stop now,

oh baby

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Reaction to the death of rock 'n' roll legend Chuck Berry

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"I am so sad to hear of Chuck Berry's passing. I want to thank him for all the inspirational music he gave to us. He lit up our teenage years, and blew life into our dreams of being musicians and performers. His lyrics shone above others and threw a strange light on the American dream. Chuck, you were amazing, and your music is engraved inside us forever." — Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones, in a series of posts via Twitter

"One of my big lights has gone out!" — Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones, in a statement

"Thou Shall Have No Other Rock Gods Before Him #ChuckBerry rip @ Rock & Roll Hall of Fame" — Drummer-producer Questlove, via Twitter

"Hail hail rock n roll. I'm glad I had a chance to know, love, and work w Chuck Berry during my life and career. Original Pure Rock n Roll." — Rocker Joan Jett, in a statement

"Chuck Berry was rock's greatest practitioner, guitarist, and the greatest pure rock 'n' roll writer who ever lived." — Bruce Springsteen, via Twitter

"I am so sad to hear about Chuck Berry passing - a big inspiration! He will be missed by everyone who loves Rock 'n Roll. Love & Mercy" — Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys, via Twitter

"Chuck Berry's life was a treasure and a triumph, and he'll never be forgotten." — former President Bill Clinton.

"Chuck Berry made the guitar a star. He took it from a rhythm background instrument ....and he intuitively choreographed the first great rock and roll stage moves whether he was playing it behind his head, between his legs, and of course the inimitable duck walk." — Joe Edwards, owner of Blueberry Hill music club in St. Louis where Chuck Berry played regularly until a few years before his death.

"The first, the best, a friend. Rest In Peace Chuck Berry." — Greg Allman of The Allman Brothers Band, via Twitter

"So sad (tilde) with the passing of Chuck Berry comes the end of an era. He was one of the best and my inspiration, a true character indeed." — Ronnie Wood of The Rolling Stones, via Twitter

"Just let me hear some of that rock 'n' roll music any old way you use it I am playing I'm talking about you. God bless Chuck Berry Chuck" — Ringo Starr of the Beatles, via Twitter

"You'll always be the Father of Rock & Roll to us, Chuck. Our thoughts are with the Berry family. #Legend #ChuckBerry" — St. Louis Cardinals baseball team, via Twitter

"It started with Chuck Berry. The 1st album I ever bought was Chuck's 'Live at the Tivoli' and I was never the same. He was more than a legend, he was a founding father. You can hear his influence in every rock & roll band from my generation on. I've been performing his 'Sweet Little Rock & Roller' since 1974 and tonight, when my band and I perform it at Caesars Palace's Colosseum, it'll be for Chuck Berry — your sound lives on." — Rod Stewart, in a statement Saturday

"Chuck Berry merged blues & swing into the phenomenon of early rock'n'roll. In music, he cast one of the longest shadows. Thank You Chuck." — The Jacksons, via Twitter

"Chuck Berry. Maybe the most important figure in all of rock and roll. His music and his influence will last forever. - Huey" — Pop-rocker Huey Lewis, via Twitter

"Chuck Berry was a rock and roll original. A gifted guitar player, an amazing live performer, and a skilled songwriter whose music and lyrics captured the essence of 1950s teenage life. It's fitting that he was the first person inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, as he influenced everyone who has picked up a guitar after him. Today, we celebrate his life. Hail Hail, Chuck Berry." — Rock and Roll of Hall of Fame and Museum, in a statement

"Your music rocketed on Earth. Then it went interstellar aboard @NASAVoyager. #JohnnyBGoode #RIP, Chuck Berry." — Astronaut Scott Kelly, via Twitter

"Heart broken to hear of the passing of Chuck Berry. He was undisputedly the king. A moment of. instagram.com/p/BRzBlKTBSu0/" — Rocker Slash, via Twitter

"Hail Hail Chuck Berry!!! None of us would have been here without you. Rock on brother! instagram.com/p/BRzBbf0Fo5c/" — Rocker Lennie Kravitz, via Twitter

"RIP Chuck Berry !!!! Thank you for the poetry, the passion and the potency! GO JOHNNY GO. - KU" — Country star Keith Urban, via Twitter

"Chuck Berry died. This breaks my heart, but 90 years old ain't bad for rock and roll. Johnny B. Goode forever." — Writer Stephen King, via Twitter

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