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Kurt Cobain's daughter, Frances Bean, pays tribute to late father on his 50th birthday

The daughter of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love paid a heartwarming tribute to her late father on what would have been his 50th birthday.

According to ABC News, Frances Bean Cobain, 24, took to social media Monday to share a message to the grunge rock legend, who died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in April 1994.

"Today would have been your 50th birthday," she wrote in an Instagram post. "You are loved and you are missed. Thank you for giving me the gift of life. Forever your daughter, Frances Bean Cobain."

>> See the post here

February 20th 2017. Happy Birthday. A post shared by Frances Bean Cobain (@space_witch666) on Feb 20, 2017 at 12:01am PST <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script>

She also shared an image of a text message exchange with her grandmother, Wendy Cobain.

"I love you so much," Frances Bean Cobain wrote. "Thank you for being my one and only Grams. I wouldn't trade you for the world and I know he is thankful that you raised me to be as strong & compassionate as you are."

>> Read more trending news

Wendy Cobain responded, "Ohhh, what beautiful words from his beloved daughter. You were such a caring, loving little girl and have turned into such a beautiful young woman. He would be so 'smugly' proud of you, saying, 'Hey, that's MY daughter.' I love you with all my heart. Thank God you were here for me to love & care for. Grams."

Frances Bean Cobain captioned the image, "Not gonna lie, I cried a little."

>> See the post here

Not gonna lie, I cried a little. I love you grams. A post shared by Frances Bean Cobain (@space_witch666) on Feb 20, 2017 at 11:39am PST <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script>

Jazz fusion guitarist Larry Coryell dies in NYC at age 73

Jazz guitarist Larry Coryell, known as the "Godfather of Fusion," has died in New York City. He was 73.

His publicist, Kurt Nishimura, said Coryell died Sunday in his hotel room of natural causes. Nishimura says he had just performed two shows at the Iridium on Friday and Saturday.

Coryell grew up in the Seattle area. After taking up the guitar, he moved to New York City in 1965.

Coryell's eclectic career includes collaborations with many of the jazz greats, including Miles Davis, Gary Burton, Alphonse Mouzon and Chet Baker. His works often mixed jazz, classical and rock ingredients.

In 1969, he recorded "Spaces," his most noted album. Many say it sparked the emergence of the jazz fusion movement.

Coryell is survived by his wife, two daughters and two sons.

Survivors mark anniversary of nightclub fire that killed 100

Survivors of a 2003 nightclub fire that killed 100 people have marked the 14th anniversary of the blaze with small gatherings where it happened.

Small gatherings of survivors and relatives of those who died were held Sunday and Monday at the site of the former Station nightclub in West Warwick. On Sunday, attendees joined hands in a circle and spent 100 seconds in silence to honor those killed. On Monday, a small group gathered during a prayer by a local priest.

The site is now a construction zone. It's being turned into a permanent memorial to those who died and to rescuers and others who helped respond to the fire on Feb. 20, 2003.

The Station Fire Memorial Foundation raised $2 million for the memorial park. Gina Russo, president of the group and a survivor of the fire, said on Monday that the cost of stone was more expensive than anticipated so the group is working to fundraise $120,000 more to pay for it.

The park is expected to open in May, Russo said.

"It's exciting to see it finally coming together," she said. "It's really nice. It's beautiful."

Pyrotechnics for the rock band Great White started the blaze, setting fire to flammable foam that lined the inside of the club. More than 200 people were injured.

Eric Church cancels 25K tickets bought by scalpers

Country star Eric Church has been battling ticket scalpers for years as his popularity grew and he began selling out arenas. But he's taken his biggest step yet by cancelling more than 25,000 tickets to his spring tour that were purchased by scalpers and putting them back on sale for fans to purchase.

The "Springsteen" singer told The Associated Press he's going to do everything he can do to stop what he calls a criminal organization that's making millions.

"They buy thousands of tickets across the U.S., not just mine, and they end up making a fortune," Church said in an interview. "They use fake credit cards, fake IDs. All of this is fraud."

The tickets will be released on Tuesday at noon local time for the remaining stops of the 60-city tour. Previously purchased tickets for his tour stops in Canada, which start Feb 28 in Ontario, have already been released and more tickets for his shows in Washington and Oregon will go on sale on Feb. 27.

Church has used this same method to cancel tickets purchased by scalpers for a few individual shows previously, but never on this scale and few artists are as meticulous as Church is when it comes to verifying who is purchasing tickets for his shows.

"We're getting better at identifying who the scalpers are," Church said. "Every artist can do this, but some of them don't. Some of them don't feel the way I feel or are as passionate."

In a report last year, investigators in New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's office cited a single broker that bought 1,012 tickets within one minute to a U2 concert at Madison Square Garden when they went on sale on Dec. 8, 2014, despite the vendor's claim of a four-ticket limit. By day's end, that broker and one other had 15,000 tickets to U2's North American shows.

The report said third-party brokers resell tickets on sites like StubHub and TicketsNow at average margins of 49 percent above face value and sometimes more than 10 times the price.

Over the years Church has tried a variety of methods to crack down on reselling tickets for money. He's used paperless ticketing, where buyers have to show a credit card at the door of the venue. He's also tried increasing the price of the tickets to make them less appealing to resellers and has increased screening of purchases through his fan club, which has access to the best seats before the general public, according to Fielding Logan, one of Church's managers at Q Prime South.

Church admits that a lot of these methods are arduous for the average fan, but he said he doesn't want his most loyal fans to pay inflated prices to see him perform. On this year's Holdin' My Own Tour, he's got no opening band and is playing two extended sets of hits from his entire catalog, including the multiplatinum album "Chief" and his most recent Country Music Association album of the year "Mr. Misunderstood."

"We're doing 39-40 songs," Church said. "I played three hours and forty minutes in Atlanta. I want the fans who are, by the last hour of the show, pulling me to the end."

Church's new tour is among the top 10 global tours with ticket prices averaging $60.67, according to Pollstar. He doesn't want to set prices at $500 for the closest seats because "that's not the people who have gotten me here."

Last year Congress passed legislation to make the use of computerized software used by ticket brokers to snap up tickets an "unfair and deceptive practice" under the Federal Trade Commission Act and allow the FTC to go after those who use it. But Church says that kind of legislation is toothless without enforcement and argues that very few scalpers are caught or prosecuted.

"They are not really backing it up with prosecuting these people," Church said. "I don't believe they will anytime soon."

But he said in the meantime, he can control who buys his tickets and he intends to do just that.

"Our fans know that as long as we tour, we're going to do everything we can to make sure they pay face value for the ticket," Church said.

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Online:

http://ericchurch.com/

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Follow Kristin M. Hall at Twitter.com/kmhall

‘Funky Drummer’ Clyde Stubblefield dead at 73

Clyde Stubblefield, whose 20-second drum break to open James Brown’s 1970 single “Funky Drummer” became one of hip-hop’s most popular samples, died Saturday, Rolling Stone reported. He was 73.

>> Read more trending news

His wife, Jody Hannon, told The Associated Press that Stubblefield died of kidney failure at a Madison, Wisconsin, hospital. He had been suffering from kidney disease for 10 years, and had been hospitalized for a few days, she said.

Stubblefield performed on several of Brown's hits in the 1960s and early 1970s, including "Cold Sweat," ''Say It Loud — I'm Black and I'm Proud," ''I've Got the Feelin'," and the album "Sex Machine."

But he was best known for his solo on "Funky Drummer." Rolling Stone said it was sampled on more than 1,000 songs and served as the backbeat for countless hip-hop tracks, including Public Enemy's "Fight the Power," Dr. Dre's "Let Me Ride," LL Cool J's "Mama Said Knock You Out" and Run-D.M.C.'s "Run's House." It even turned up on Ed Sheeran's "Shirtsleeves" and George Michael's "Freedom '90," the magazine said.

"We were sitting up in the studio, getting ready for a session, and I guess when I got set up I just started playing a pattern. Started playing something," Stubblefield told Rolling Stone. "The bassline came in and the guitar came in and we just had a rhythm going, and if Brown liked it, I just said, 'Well, I'll put something with it.'"

Stubblefield was not listed as a songwriter on the track and therefore didn't see many royalties from the decades of sampling.

"All the drum patterns I played with Brown was my own; he never told me how to play or what to play," Stubblefield told SF Weekly in 2012. "I just played my own patterns, and the hip-hoppers and whatever, the people that used the material probably paid him, maybe. But we got nothing. I got none of it. It was all my drum product."

"People use my drum patterns on a lot of these songs,” Stubblefield told the New York Times in 2011. They never gave me credit, never paid me. It didn't bug me or disturb me, but I think it’s disrespectful not to pay people for what they use."

Born in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 1943, Stubblefield served as a session musician and toured under Otis Redding before becoming Brown's drummer from 1965 to 1971, Rolling Stone reported. He had lived in Madison, his wife's hometown, since the early 1970s, she told the AP.

When Prince heard in 2000 that Stubblefield was suffering from bladder cancer and was deep in debt with medical bills, he paid $90,000 to cover his chemotherapy expenses, Hannon told the AP. In 2002, he had a kidney removed, and he suffered from end-stage renal disease over the last decade, Rolling Stone reported. 

"We lost another Pillar Stone that held up the Foundation of Funk," Bootsy Collins, who performed with Stubblefield on “Sex Machine,” wrote in a Facebook post Saturday. "Mr. Clyde Stubblefield has left our frequency.”

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8L4gITE3nUc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

<script>(function(d, s, id) {  var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];  if (d.getElementById(id)) return;  js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;  js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&amp;version=v2.8";  fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));</script> We lost another Pillar Stone that held up the Foundation of Funk. Mr.Clyde Stubblefield has left our frequency. I am...Posted by William "Bootsy" Collins on Saturday, February 18, 2017

James Brown's 'Funky Drummer' Clyde Stubblefield dies at 73

Clyde Stubblefield, a drummer for James Brown who created one of the most widely sampled drum breaks ever, died Saturday. He was 73.

His wife, Jody Hannon, told The Associated Press that Stubblefield died of kidney failure at a Madison, Wisconsin, hospital around noon. He had been suffering from kidney disease for 10 years, and had been hospitalized for a few days, she said.

Stubblefield performed on several of Brown's classics in the 1960s and early 70s, including "Cold Sweat," ''Say It Loud — I'm Black and I'm Proud," ''I've Got the Feelin'," and the album "Sex Machine."

But he was best known for a short solo on Brown's 1970 single, "Funky Drummer." Rolling Stone magazine said it was sampled on over 1,000 songs and served as the backbeat for countless hip-hop tracks, including Public Enemy's "Fight the Power," Dr. Dre's "Let Me Ride," LL Cool J's "Mama Said Knock You Out" and Run-D.M.C.'s "Run's House." It even turned up on Ed Sheeran's "Shirtsleeves" and George Michael's "Freedom '90," the magazine said.

Hennon said Stubblefield saw "very little" in royalties and never expected them.

But Stubblefield was held in high esteem by his fellow musicians. When Prince got wind in 2000 that Stubblefield was deep in debt from a fight against bladder cancer, he personally paid $90,000 to cover his bills, she said. "Clyde was considered his favorite drummer," she added.

Stubblefield was "a very nice southern gentleman" from Chattanooga, Tennessee, but had lived in Madison, his wife's hometown, since the early 1970s, she said. He had long been a fixture on the local music scene.

"He played here one time with James Brown and just fell in love with it," Hannon said.

Services are pending.

Texas judge allows lawsuit against Selena widower to proceed

A Texas judge says a lawsuit against the widower of slain Tejano star Selena can proceed as her father seeks to block a TV series about her.

Selena's father, Abraham Quintanilla, opposes the show. It's based on what he calls an unauthorized book, "To Selena With Love," by Selena's husband, Chris Perez.

Lawyers for Perez wanted the lawsuit dismissed based on free speech grounds. They had no immediate comment on Friday's ruling.

Quintanilla is suing Perez and two companies planning to adapt the widower's memoir into a series. The lawsuit says that after Selena's 1995 slaying, Perez signed a deal that gave all rights to Selena's likeness and name to her estate.

Selena Quintanilla-Perez was shot by her fan club president, now serving life in prison.

The top 10 songs and albums on the iTunes Store

Top Songs

1. Shape of You, Ed Sheeran

2. I Don't Wanna Live Forever (Fifty Shades Darker), ZAYN & Taylor Swift

3. Chained to the Rhythm (feat. Skip Marley), Katy Perry

4. Million Reasons, Lady Gaga

5. That's What I Like, Bruno Mars

6. Body Like a Back Road, Sam Hunt

7. I Feel It Coming (feat. Daft Punk), The Weeknd

8. 24K Magic, Bruno Mars

9. The Fighter (feat. Carrie Underwood), Keith Urban

10. Bom Bidi Bom, Nick Jonas & Nicki Minaj

Top Albums

1. Fifty Shades Darker (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack), Various Artists

2. Lemonade, Beyoncé

3. I Make the Static - EP, Joy Villa

4. 24K Magic, Bruno Mars

5. Trolls (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack), Various Artists

6. La La Land (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack), Various Artists

7. 25, Adele

8. A Sailor's Guide to Earth, Sturgill Simpson

9. Joanne , Lady Gaga

10. I Decided., Big Sean

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(copyright) 2017 Apple Inc.

Mariah Carey confirms new beau; talks new single, tour

Mariah Carey has a vision of love for her backup dancer Bryan Tanaka.

Carey, who posted an Instagram picture with her and Tanaka drinking champagne in a tub on Valentine's Day, confirmed the romance in an interview with The Associated Press on Wednesday, though she declined to say much more than that.

"I'm just going to be like 'I really don't talk about my personal life.' Because that's what I used to do and it really worked for a minute, back, a while ago," she said, smiling. "I just don't feel comfortable talking about my personal life. ... Me and my boyfriend don't want to do that."

Carey's reluctance to talk in the media about her romance is understandable given the drama that erupted when she and billionaire James Packer broke up last year. The split wasn't amicable and led to plenty of tabloid headlines.

But it seems to have also inspired Carey musically. Her latest single, "I Don't," featuring rapper YG, is about a breakup: "We got together and did the song in like a day and the video the next day."

In the video, Carey dresses in sexy white lingerie with a white bridal garter on her thigh. In one line, YG raps, "Hold up, give me my ring back. Never mind you could keep that." Meanwhile, Carey flips off the camera with the ring on her middle finger — a ring that looks just like the one Packer gave her.

The video also shows her throwing a wedding gown in a fire pit, a gown that looks very much like the Valentino dress she had custom-made for her wedding.

"It was fun and it wasn't that very expensive one that they think it is," she clarified. "You shouldn't be wasteful, so I'm going to do something with charity and wedding dresses, I think."

Carey is due to hit the road this spring with Lionel Richie for "All the Hits Tour," which runs from March 15 through May 27. She met Richie for the first time when she was invited to sing "Hero" with Luciano Pavarotti in 1999.

For the tour — hitting such cities Chicago, Cleveland, Boston, Detroit, New York, St. Louis, Denver, Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta and Seattle, among many others — she'll be bringing her 5 year-old twins, Moroccan Scott Cannon and Monroe Cannon, along for the journey.

"Roc and Roe do get to come," she said. "They love to go onstage and actually they are very musical already. They have their school, and they have their teacher. They are doing really well but they don't love the school, let's just put it that way. But they are happy when they get to go with me on tour and there's other kids there, too, so it's good."

Carey has sold more than 200 million records worldwide, making her one of the best-selling music artists of all time. But she says staying hot in the game isn't easy.

"It's very difficult, especially the way the business is now," she said. "I truly love music and always have. It's not like ... 'Oh, here's a way to get famous.' It wasn't any of those things. It was my release, it was my everything and it still is. So I think that I'm just grateful that people still tune in."

She also once again addressed the debacle on "Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin Eve" where she stopped singing during her live performance after having technical issues, which led to fingers pointing between Dick Clark Productions and Carey.

"I didn't obsess over the New Year's Eve thing," she added. "I mean, I was upset about the fact that people didn't understand, but it's like, I can only explain it like this to you."

She added: "It's like I'm the only one that has to make five million comebacks. ... For me there are different rules, I don't know why. I don't know why it's not OK that I was just like victimized and vilified by the situation."

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Online:

http://www.mariahcarey.com

http://www.livenation.com

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