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Scott Thomas recalls intensity of "The Party" at Berlin fest

Kristin Scott Thomas recalls feeling "a sort of panic" while making director Sally Potter's "The Party," in which she plays a politician celebrating a promotion.

Potter described the movie Monday as "a light and loving look at the state of England, a kind of broken England." It's one of 18 films competing at the Berlin International Film Festival for its Golden Bear award.

Filmed in black and white, the film follows a party to celebrate Scott Thomas' character's appointment as a top opposition spokeswoman, which then goes badly wrong.

Scott Thomas said it was "almost like doing a play."

She recalled "a sort of panic, knowing that we had two weeks to shoot it and ... we had to get it right the first time, because there was no room for multiple takes."

Winners at the 2017 British Academy Film Awards

Film — "La La Land"

British Film — "I, Daniel Blake"

Director — Damien Chazelle

Actor — Casey Affleck

Actress — Emma Stone

Supporting Actor — Dev Patel

Supporting Actress — Viola Davis

Rising Star — Tom Holland

British Debut — "Under the Shadow"

Original Screenplay — Kenneth Lonergan, "Manchester by the Sea"

Adapted Screenplay — Luke Davies, "Lion"

Film Not in the English Language — "Son of Saul"

Music — Justin Hurwitz, "La La Land"

Cinematography — Linus Sandgren, "La La Land"

Editing — John Gilbert, "Hacksaw Ridge"

Production Design — Stuart Craig and Anna Pinnock, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them"

Costume Design — Madeleine Fontaine, "Jackie"

Sound — Claude La Haye, Bernard Gariepy Strobl and Sylvain Bellemare, "Arrival"

Visual Effects — "The Jungle Book"

Makeup and Hair — J. Roy Helland and Daniel Phillips, "Florence Foster Jenkins"

Animated Feature — "Kubo and the Two Strings"

Short Film — "Home"

Short Animation — "A Love Story"

Documentary — "13th"

Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema — Curzon

Academy Fellowship — Mel Brooks

"La La Land" takes 5 prizes at British academy awards

Glamour was shot through with grit at the British Academy Film Awards on Sunday.

Frothy musical "La La Land" took five prizes including best picture, but major awards also went to tough welfare-state drama "I, Daniel Blake" and fractured-family stories "Lion" and "Manchester by the Sea."

In keeping with an awards season that has coincided with a wrenching change of government in the United States, even "La La Land's" prizes came with a political tinge.

Accepting the best-actress trophy for playing a barista who dreams of Hollywood stardom, Emma Stone said that "this country and the US, and the world seems to be going through a bit of a time."

She said that in a divided world, it was vital to celebrate "the positive gift of creativity and how it can transcend borders and how it help people to feel a little less alone."

The U.K. awards, known as BAFTAs, are often seen as an indicator of who will win at Hollywood's Academy Awards, held two weeks later. "La La Land" already is a dominant force at the Oscars, with 14 nominations. It also has won seven Golden Globes.

"La La Land" had 11 nominations for the British awards and won prizes for Stone, director Damien Chazelle, music and cinematography as well as best picture.

But while the luscious musical was an academy favorite, voters also rewarded less escapist fare.

Stone's co-star, Ryan Gosling, lost out on the best-actor prize to Casey Affleck, who played a grieving handyman in "Manchester by the Sea."

Affleck, who is also Oscar-nominated for the role, thanked writer-director Kenneth Lonergan for creating a film that "dignifies everyday lives and their struggles with great compassion."

The wintry New England drama also won Lonergan the prize for best original screenplay.

British actor Dev Patel pulled off an upset, beating favorite Mahershala Ali, from "Moonlight," to the best supporting actor trophy for "Lion," about a young man who goes searching for the Indian family from which he was separated as a child.

The London-born Patel expressed shock at being a winner at a ceremony he used to watch on TV with his family.

He said "Lion," which co-stars Nicole Kidman is "a film, about family, about a love that transcends borders, race, color, anything."

The "Slumdog Millionaire" star thanked his "amazing team, who had the insane task of trying to get this Indian dude, this noodle with wonky teeth and a lazy eye and floppy hair, work in this industry."

"Lion" also took the BAFTA for best adapted screenplay.

Ken Loach's "I, Daniel Blake" was named best British film. The 80-year-old director used his acceptance speech to lambast the country's Conservative government.

Loach said his docudrama about a carpenter trying to get welfare after a heart attack shows that "the most vulnerable and the poorest people are treated by this government with a callous brutality that is disgraceful."

Loach apologized for making a political speech, but told reporters backstage that "you can't do a film like this and then talk showbiz."

Loach was cheered by an audience at London's Royal Albert Hall that included Prince William, his wife, Kate, and nominees including Meryl Streep, Affleck, Stone and Kidman.

Both William and Kate wore black and white — he a tuxedo, she an off-the-shoulder Alexander McQueen gown and glittering chandelier earrings.

Viola Davis won the supporting actress BAFTA for "Fences," Denzel Washington's adaptation of August Wilson's stage drama about an African-American family.

A visibly moved Davis praised Wilson's play for showing "that our lives mattered as African Americans."

"The horse groomer, the sanitation worker, the people who grew up under the heavy boot of Jim Crow," she said. "The people who did not make it into history books, but they have a story — and those stories deserve to be told."

Ava DuVernay's film about mass incarceration in America, "13th," was named best documentary, and Laszlo Nemes' unbearably powerful Holocaust drama "Son of Saul" took the trophy for best foreign-language film.

The stars brought a dose of glamour to gray, wintry London, as hundreds of fans lined the red carpet outside the domed concert hall beside London's Hyde Park.

Many said they were unsurprised politics made a guest appearance at the ceremony, as it has so often this awards season. Streep is among the stars who have used the awards stage to criticize President Donald Trump.

Master of ceremonies Stephen Fry joked about Trump's dismissal of Streep as overrated, declaring from the stage: "I look down on row after row of the most overrated people on the planet."

Prince William, who serves as president of Britain's film academy, presented the academy's lifetime-achievement honor to veteran comedian Mel Brooks at the end of Sunday's ceremony.

The 90-year-old entertainer said he would treasure the trophy.

"This is one of the awards you will not see on eBay," he said.

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This story has been corrected to show DuVernay's first name is Ava and her film is "13th."

"La La Land" named best picture at British Academy Film Awards

"La La Land" named best picture at British Academy Film Awards.

Emma Stone named best actress at British Academy Film Awards for "La La Land"

Emma Stone named best actress at British Academy Film Awards for "La La Land"

Damien Chazelle named best director at British Academy Film Awards for "La La Land"

Damien Chazelle named best director at British Academy Film Awards for "La La Land"

Casey Affleck named best actor at British Academy Film Awards for "Manchester by the Sea"

Casey Affleck named best actor at British Academy Film Awards for "Manchester by the Sea"

The Latest: 'La La Land' wins best picture at British awards

The Latest on the British Academy Film Awards (all times local):

9:16 p.m.

"La La Land" has been named best picture at the British Academy Film Awards.

The top award during Sunday's ceremony was the fifth for the effervescent musical about love and ambition in Los Angeles.

Emma Stone was named best actress for her performance in "La La Land."

Damien Chazelle also won the best director BAFTA for the film, which had 11 nominations going into the London ceremony.

"La La Land" also took prizes for music and cinematography.

___

9:06 p.m.

Emma Stone has been named best actress at the British Academy Film Awards for her performance in "La La Land."

Damien Chazelle also won the best director BAFTA for the effervescent musical that took prizes for music and cinematography as well.

"La La Land" had 11 nominations in all for the prizes awarded Sunday, Britain's equivalent of the Oscars.

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9 p.m.

Casey Affleck has been named best actor at the British Academy Film Awards for playing a grieving handyman in "Manchester by the Sea."

Affleck thanked writer-director Kenneth Lonergan for creating a film that "dignifies everyday lives and their struggles with great compassion."

Affleck is also Oscar-nominated for the performance.

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8:34 p.m.

Dev Patel has won the best supporting actor prize at the British Academy Film Awards for playing a young man in search of his lost family in "Lion."

It's was the film's second prize of the evening at Britain's equivalent of the Oscars. "Lion" also won for adapted screenplay.

The London-born Patel expressed shock at being a winner at a ceremony he used to watch on television with his family.

He said "Lion," which co-stars Nicole Kidman, is "a film about family, about a love that transcends race, borders, color, anything."

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8:13 p.m.

Viola Davis has won the British Academy Film Award for best supporting actress for her performance in "Fences," Denzel Washington's adaptation of August Wilson's stage drama about an African-American family.

A visibly moved Davis praised Wilson's play for showing "that our lives mattered as African Americans."

She said: "The horse groomer, the sanitation worker, the people who grew up under the heavy boot of Jim Crow. The people who did not make it into history books, but they have a story — and those stories deserve to be told."

The awards are Britain's equivalent of the Oscars.

___

7:57 p.m.

Ada DuVernay's film about mass incarceration in America, "The 13th," has been named best documentary at the British Academy Film Awards.

DuVernay's feature film follow-up to her Oscar-nominated civil rights epic "Selma" explores the historic roots of the United States' high incarceration rate.

It takes its name from the section of the U.S. Constitution that abolished slavery "except as a punishment for crime."

The awards are taking place Sunday in London.

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7:21 p.m.

"I, Daniel Blake," director Ken Loach's hard-hitting drama about a man caught in the U.K.'s labyrinthine welfare system, has been named best British picture at the British Academy Film Awards.

The 80-year-old director used his speech to lambast Britain's Conservative government, saying his gritty drama shows that "the most vulnerable and the poorest people are treated by this government with a callous brutality that is disgraceful."

Loach also branded the government's decision to end a program bringing child refugees to Britain "a disgrace."

The best British picture prize was the first handed out Sunday at Britain's equivalent of the Oscars. The musical "La La Land" has 11 nominations and is favored to win several awards.

___

6:21 p.m.

Viola Davis says being nominated for a best supporting actress award in Britain shows that playwright August Wilson "told a universal story of the everyman and American history" with "Fences."

Davis was seen as the favorite to win the British Academy Film Award in that category for Denzel Washington's screen adaptation of Wilson's stage drama about an African-American family.

The U.K. awards, known as BAFTAs, are seen as an indicator of who will win at Hollywood's Academy Awards, held two weeks later.

Prince William and his wife, Kate, were due on the red carpet, along with other nominees, including Meryl Streep, Casey Affleck and Nicole Kidman.

The stars brought a dose of glamor to gray, wintry London, as hundreds of fans lined the red carpet at Royal Albert Hall.

___

10:19 a.m.

Hollywood stars will mingle with British royalty at the British Academy Film Awards, where "La La Land" is favored to dance away with multiple trophies.

Prince William and his wife Kate are expected on the red carpet at London's Royal Albert Hall, along with nominees including Meryl Streep, Casey Affleck and Nicole Kidman.

"La La Land," an effervescent musical starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, has 11 nominations, including best picture, best actor and best actress.

Its competition includes Ken Loach's gritty "I, Daniel Blake," a stinging critique of Britain's welfare system.

The U.K. awards are often an indicator of who will win at Hollywood's Academy Awards, held two weeks later.

Prince William is due to present the British academy's fellowship to veteran comedian Mel Brooks during Sunday's ceremony.

Hollywood stars mingled with British royalty on Sunday at the British Academy Film Awards, where "La La Land" was favored to dance away with multiple trophies.

Prince William and his wife Kate were due on the red carpet at London's Royal Albert Hall, along with nominees including Meryl Streep, Casey Affleck and Nicole Kidman.

"La La Land," an effervescent musical starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, has 11 nominations, including best picture, best actor and best actress.

The U.K. awards, known as BAFTAs, are often seen as an indicator of who will win at Hollywood's Academy Awards, held two weeks later. "La La Land" already is a dominant force at the Oscars, with 14 nominations. It also has won seven Golden Globes.

Viola Davis was seen as the favorite to win the best supporting actress BAFTA for "Fences," Denzel Washington's adaptation of August Wilson's stage drama about an African-American family.

Davis said being recognized in Britain was proof that Wilson "has told a universal story of the everyman and American history."

The stars brought a dose of glamor to gray, wintry London, as hundreds of fans lined the red carpet outside a domed concert hall beside London's Hyde Park.

Many of those attending expected politics to make a guest appearance at the ceremony, as it has so often this awards season. Streep is among the stars who have used the awards stage to criticize President Donald Trump.

Barry Jenkins, director of best-picture nominee "Moonlight," said, "People ought to speak from their heart. If there's something you've got to say, then say it."

Prince William, who is also president of Britain's film academy, was to present the academy's lifetime-achievement honor to veteran comedian Mel Brooks during Sunday's ceremony.

And while the luscious "La La Land" was the favorite, academy voters could choose to reward less escapist fare.

The philosophical sci-fi yarn "Arrival" and the psychological thriller "Nocturnal Animals" have nine BAFTA nominations each. Director Ken Loach's gritty "I, Daniel Blake," a stinging critique of Britain's welfare system, was up for five awards.

Best-picture contenders are "Arrival," ''I, Daniel Blake," ''La La Land," the wrenching New England drama "Manchester By The Sea" and the Miami-set coming-of-age story "Moonlight."

The BAFTAs differ from their U.S. counterpart in having a separate category for best British film. Nominees in that category include "I, Daniel Blake"; the raucous road trip "American Honey"; the courtroom drama "Denial"; the wizarding adventure "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them"; the documentary "Notes on Blindness"; and the Iran-set horror film "Under the Shadow."

Gosling's rivals in the best actor race were Andrew Garfield for "Hacksaw Ridge"; Casey Affleck for "Manchester by the Sea"; Jake Gyllenhaal for "Nocturnal Animals"; and Viggo Mortensen for "Captain Fantastic."

Best-actress contenders were Stone; Amy Adams for "Arrival"; Emily Blunt for "The Girl on the Train"; Meryl Streep for "Florence Foster Jenkins"; and Natalie Portman for "Jackie."

'Lego Batman' dominates 'Fifty Shades Darker' at box office

Moviegoers could choose violence, sex or family-friendly fare this weekend with three diverse new offerings that all drew healthy numbers at the North American box office.

"The Lego Batman Movie" took the top spot with $55.6 million, dominating "Fifty Shades Darker," which attracted $46.8 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

The spinoff of 2014's "Lego Movie" benefited from good reviews and a lack of competition in the family space, which is expected to help it maintain its pace going into the holiday weekend, when kids are out of school.

A whopping 48 percent of opening weekend audiences was under 25. It also bodes well for Warner Bros.' next Lego spinoff, "The Lego Ninjago Movie," set for September.

U.S. audiences were slightly less curious to catch up with the exploits of Christian Grey and Ana Steele the second time around. The sequel didn't compare to "Fifty Shades of Grey's" $85.2 million debut in 2015.

Nick Carpou, Universal Pictures' president of domestic theatrical distribution, said the first movie debuted in a "perfect storm." The film adaptation of the best-selling book had gained immense interest and Valentine's Day fell on a Saturday in 2015, making the movie a date-night destination. This year, the holiday lands on a Tuesday.

"This is a great start," Carpou said, noting that the CinemaScore from audiences is stronger for the sequel. "The story will be told through the first part of this week."

"Fifty Shades Darker" fared much better abroad, bringing in $100.1 million and topping international charts.

The other R-rated sequel in theaters this weekend, "John Wick: Chapter 2" took third place. With $30 million, it more than doubled the debut of the original. The Keanu Reeves hit man flick became a sleeper hit on the small screen, and that goodwill helped bolster interest in the follow-up, which is also getting strong reviews.

"People really love its unapologetic violence," said Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst for box office tracker comScore.

Rounding out the top five were holdovers "Split," the M. Night Shyamalan psychological thriller that added $9.3 million, for a total of $112.3 million in earnings, and Oscar contender "Hidden Figures" with $8 million, boosting its total to $131.5 million.

It was a strong weekend overall for theaters, attributable to the different options available, Dergarabedian said.

"The tried and true brands are what people really gravitated to this weekend. The top three movies this weekend all based on brands that people know and love," he said. "Each film drew their own audience without harming the other films. This was a perfectly programmed weekend."

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to comScore. Where available, the latest international numbers for Friday through Sunday also are included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

1. "The Lego Batman Movie," $55.6 million ($37 million international).

2. "Fifty Shades Darker," $46.8 million ($100.1 million international).

3. "John Wick: Chapter 2," $30 million ($10.6 million international).

4. "Split," $9.3 million ($8.5 million international).

5. "Hidden Figures," $8 million ($2.7 million international).

6. "A Dog's Purpose," $7.4 million ($1.5 million international).

7. "Rings," $5.8 million ($9.6 million international).

8. "La La Land," $5 million ($11.5 million international).

9. "Lion," $4.1 million ($3.6 million international).

10. "The Space Between Us," $1.8 million ($1.3 million international).

___

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at international theaters (excluding the U.S. and Canada), according to comScore:

1. "Fifty Shades Darker," $100.1 million.

2. "xXx: The Return of Xander Cage," $69.3 million.

3. "The Lego Batman Movie," $37 million.

4. "Kung Fu Yoga," $16 million.

5. "Cook Up a Storm, $12.1 million.

6. "Duckweed," $11.8 million.

7. "La La Land," $11.5 million.

8. "Jolly LLB 2," $10.5 million.

9. "Rings," $9.6 million.

10. "Split," $8.5 million.

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Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

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Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/ldbahr

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