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Debbie Reynolds' death certificate confirms stroke

Debbie Reynolds died of a stroke and her daughter Carrie Fisher died of cardiac arrest, according to their death certificates.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued Reynolds' death certificate in the name of Mary Frances Reynolds. It was obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press.

Under "cause of death" it says "intracerebral hemorrhage," a type of stroke caused by bleeding in the brain rather than the more common type caused by a clot. The certificate lists high blood pressure as an underlying cause.

Reynolds died at 84 on Dec. 28 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, the certificate says.

The death certificate lists Reynolds' son Todd Fisher as the notifying party, and says Reynolds had been in the entertainment business for 68 years.

Reynolds suffered a medical emergency while making memorial plans for Fisher, who died a day earlier.

Fisher's death certificate, obtained Monday, lists the cause of death as "cardiac arrest/deferred." The "deferred" designation indicates that more investigation is needed by the coroner, usually in the form of toxicology tests that can take several weeks to complete.

The certificate says Fisher had been in the entertainment business for 46 years.

Fisher had a medical emergency on a flight from London to Los Angeles on Dec. 23. She died at 60 on Dec. 27 at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, the certificate says.

Fisher, best known for her role in the "Star Wars" saga, and Reynolds, who starred in "Singin' in the Rain," were mourned in a joint memorial at their neighboring homes on Thursday and had a joint funeral at a Hollywood Hills cemetery the next day.

Relatives have said they are planning a public memorial.

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This story has been corrected to show that Fisher died from cardiac arrest. It was not stated whether the cardiac arrest was due to a heart attack.

'La La Land,' 'Moonlight,' 'Deadpool' among PGA nominees

Oscar favorites "La La Land," ''Moonlight" and "Manchester by the Sea" were nominated by the Producers Guild of America for its top award on Tuesday. But the snarky, expletive-spewing superhero of "Deadpool" continued his unlikely awards season campaign.

The guild's 10 nominees for its best picture honor, the Darryl F. Zanuck Award, also included "Arrival," ''Fences," ''Hacksaw Ridge," ''Hell or High Water," ''Hidden Figures" and "Lion." It was a largely expected bunch plus the surprising inclusion of "Deadpool."

But the R-rated "X-Men" spinoff has now run up a slew of nominations, proving the industry has considerable admiration for the comic-book hit. It last week landed a nomination for best adapted screenplay the Writers Guild, and it was twice nominated by the Golden Globes.

PGA nominees have historically been a good predictor for which films will receive Academy Award nominations for best picture. And for seven consecutive years up to last year, the PGA's top prize matched (in one case with a tie) the academy's top honor. Last year, however, the PGA chose "The Big Short," while "Spotlight" won the Oscar. The Producers' Guild uses the same preferential balloting system that the Academy of Motion Pictures employs.

The producers also nominated five films for best animated movie: "Finding Dory," ''Kubo and the Two Strings," ''Moana," ''The Secret Life of Pets" and "Zootopia."

Winner will be announced in a Jan. 28 ceremony at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California.

Latest: Debbie Reynolds' death certificate confirms stroke

The Latest on the deaths of Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds (all times local):

9 a.m.

Debbie Reynolds' death certificate confirms that the actress died of a stroke.

The Los Angeles County death certificate was obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press.

Under cause of death it says "intracerebral hemorrhage," a type of stroke caused by bleeding in the brain. The certificate lists high blood pressure as an underlying cause.

Reynolds died at age 84 on Dec. 28 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, the certificate says.

It lists Reynolds' son Todd Fisher as the notifying party, and gives Reynolds' occupation as "actress."

Her daughter, Carrie Fisher, had died a day earlier. Fisher's death certificate lists the cause as "cardiac arrest."

Fisher, star of the "Star Wars" saga, and Reynolds, the "Singin' in the Rain" actress, had a joint funeral last week.

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This story has been corrected to show that Fisher died from cardiac arrest. It was not stated whether the cardiac arrest was due to a heart attack.

'Wolverine' sequel 'Logan' to premiere at Berlin film fest

"Logan," the third movie focusing on Hugh Jackman's Marvel superhero Wolverine, is to premiere at next month's Berlin International Film Festival.

The film, directed by James Mangold, sees the aging Logan set out on a last adventure to protect a young girl with special powers in a post-apocalyptic world.

Patrick Stewart reprises his role as Professor X, while Richard E. Grant plays the villain Zander Rice.

It was among 13 further movies announced Tuesday for the lineup of the festival that opens Feb. 9.

Festival organizers said "Viceroy's House," a film about the 1947 partition of India starring Hugh Bonneville, Gillian Anderson, Manish Dayal and Huma Qureshi, will also premiere in Berlin.

The festival's top Golden Bear prize will be awarded Feb. 18 by a jury under Dutch director Paul Verhoeven.

List of nominees for 2017 British Academy Film Awards

Nominations in the main categories for the British Academy Film Awards, announced Tuesday:

Best film: "La La Land"; "Arrival"; "I, Daniel Blake"; "Moonlight"; "Manchester by the Sea"

Outstanding British film: "American Honey"; "Denial"; "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them"; "I, Daniel Blake"; "Notes on Blindness"

Leading actress: Amy Adams, "Arrival"; Emily Blunt, "The Girl on the Train"; Emma Stone, "La La Land"; Meryl Streep, "Florence Foster Jenkins"; Natalie Portman, "Jackie"

Leading actor: Andrew Garfield, "Hacksaw Ridge"; Casey Affleck, "Manchester by the Sea"; Jake Gyllenhaal, "Nocturnal Animals"; Ryan Gosling, "La La Land"; Viggo Mortensen, "Captain Fantastic"

Supporting actress: Hayley Squires, "I, Daniel Blake"; Michelle Williams, "Manchester by the Sea"; Naomie Harris, "Moonlight"; Nicole Kidman, "Lion"; Viola Davis, "Fences"

Supporting actor: Aaron Taylor-Johnson, "Nocturnal Animals"; Dev Patel, "Lion"; Hugh Grant, "Florence Foster Jenkins"; Jeff Bridges, "Hell or High Water"; Mahershala Ali, "Moonlight"

Director: Denis Villeneuve, "Arrival"; Ken Loach, "I, Daniel Blake"; Damien Chazelle, "La La Land"; Kenneth Lonergan, "Manchester by the Sea"; Tom Ford, "Nocturnal Animals"

Film not in the English language: "Dheepan"; "Julieta"; "Mustang"; "Son of Saul"; "Toni Erdmann"

Documentary: "13th"; "The Beatles: Eight Days a Week"; "The Eagle Huntress"; "Notes on Blindness"; "Weiner"

Animated film: "Finding Dory"; "Kubo and the Two Strings"; "Moana"; "Zootropolis"

Outstanding debut by a British writer, director or producer: Mike Carley and Camille Gatin, "The Girl With All the Gifts"; George Amponsah and Dionne Walker, "The Hard Stop"; Peter Middleton, James Spinney and Jo-Jo Ellison, "Notes on Blindness"; John Donnelly and Ben A. Williams, "The Pass"; Babak Anvari, Emily Leo, Oliver Roskill and Lucan Toh, "Under the Shadow"

Original screenplay: "Hell or High Water"; "I, Daniel Blake"; "La La Land"; "Manchester by the Sea": "Moonlight"

Adapted screenplay: "Arrival"; "Hacksaw Ridge"; "Hidden Figures"; "Lion"; "Nocturnal Animals"

Editing: "Arrival"; "Hacksaw Ridge"; "La La Land"; "Manchester by the Sea"; "Nocturnal Animals"

Production design: "Doctor Strange"; "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them"; "Hail, Caesar!"; "La La Land"; "Nocturnal Animals"

Costume design: "Allied"; "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them"; "Florence Foster Jenkins"; "Jackie"; "La La Land."

Makeup and Hair: "Doctor Strange"; "Florence Foster Jenkins"; "Hacksaw Ridge"; "Nocturnal Animals"; "Rogue One"

Sound: "Arrival"; "Deepwater Horizon": "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them"; "Hacksaw Ridge"; "La La Land"

Special visual effects: "Arrival"; "Doctor Strange"; "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them"; "The Jungle Book"; "Rogue One"

Rising Star: Anna Taylor-Joy; Laia Costa; Lucas Hedges; Ruth Negga; Tom Holland

"La La Land" leads race for British Academy Film Awards

The perky, pastel-hued jazz musical "La La Land" quick-stepped into an awards-season lead Tuesday, gaining 11 nominations for the British Academy Film Awards , the U.K. equivalent of the Oscars.

The sweet-tempered Ryan Gosling-Emma Stone romance is up for best picture, director, actor and actress at the British awards, which are considered a strong indicator of likely success at Hollywood's prize-giving next month.

The nominations add to the musical's momentum after it won seven prizes at the Golden Globes on Sunday.

Philosophical sci-fi yarn "Arrival" and psychological thriller "Nocturnal Animals" have nine nominations each for the U.K prizes, known as BAFTAs. The contenders were announced at the British academy's London headquarters by actors Dominic Cooper and Sophie Turner.

Best-picture nominees are "La La Land"; "Arrival"; welfare-state drama "I, Daniel Blake"; Miami coming-of-age story "Moonlight"; and soul-baring domestic drama "Manchester by the Sea."

Best-actor nominees are Andrew Garfield for "Hacksaw Ridge"; Casey Affleck for "Manchester by the Sea"; Jake Gyllenhaal for "Nocturnal Animals"; Gosling for "La La Land"; and Viggo Mortensen for "Captain Fantastic."

Best-actress contenders are Amy Adams for "Arrival"; Emily Blunt for "The Girl on the Train"; Stone for "La La Land"; Meryl Streep for "Florence Foster Jenkins"; and Natalie Portman for "Jackie."

Among supporting actor and actress nominees are Jeff Bridges for "Hell or High Water"; Viola Davis for "Fences"; and Nicole Kidman and Dev Patel for "Lion."

London-born Patel said it was an honor to be recognized in his home city. "My family is literally freaking out right now," he said.

Also up for best supporting actor is Hugh Grant, for his performance as minor actor St. Clair Bayfield, partner of Streep's tone-deaf opera singer, in "Florence Foster Jenkins."

"This is so kind of BAFTA, and I feel very pleased both for myself and for St. Clair Bayfield, neither of us having been exactly awards-season habitues," Grant said.

Best-director nominations went to Denis Villeneuve for "Arrival"; Ken Loach for "I, Daniel Blake"; Damien Chazelle for "La La land"; Kenneth Lonergan for "Manchester by the Sea"; and Tom Ford for "Nocturnal Animals."

Winners of the British trophies will be announced at London's Royal Albert Hall on Feb. 12, two weeks before the Oscars.

The BAFTAs differ from their U.S. counterpart in having a separate category for best British film. Nominees are "I, Daniel Blake"; raucous road trip "American Honey"; courtroom drama "Denial"; wizarding adventure "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them"; documentary "Notes on Blindness"; and Iran-set horror film "Under the Shadow."

Correction: Carrie Fisher story

In a story Jan. 10 about the death of Carrie Fisher, The Associated Press erroneously reported that Carrie Fisher's death certificate said she died of a heart attack. Her death certificate shows she died from cardiac arrest, but does not state whether the cardiac arrest was due to a heart attack.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Carrie Fisher's death certificate confirms cardiac arrest

Carrie Fisher's death certificate confirms that the actress died from cardiac arrest, but it says more investigation is needed to try to determine the underlying cause

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Carrie Fisher's death certificate confirms that the actress died of cardiac arrest, but it says more investigation is needed to try to determine the underlying cause.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued the death certificate in the name of Carrie Frances Fisher. It was obtained Monday by The Associated Press.

Under "cause of death" it says "cardiac arrest/deferred." The "deferred" designation indicates that more investigation is needed by the county coroner, usually in the form of toxicology tests that can take several weeks to complete.

Fisher's daughter Billie Lourd is listed as the notifying party.

Fisher had a heart attack on a flight from London to Los Angeles on Dec. 23. She died at age 60 on Dec. 27 at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, the certificate says.

Her mother Debbie Reynolds died the following day at another Los Angeles hospital, after having her own medical emergency while making memorial plans for her daughter.

The death certificate lists "writer" as the occupation in which Fisher spent most of her life.

It also says Fisher had been in the entertainment business for 46 years, and her highest level of education was 10th grade.

The information in the certificate was first reported by TMZ.

Fisher, star of the "Star Wars" saga, and Reynolds, the "Singin' in the Rain" actress, were mourned in a joint memorial at their neighboring homes on Thursday, and had a joint funeral at a Hollywood Hills cemetery the next day.

Relatives have said they are now planning a public memorial for them.

Michael Chamberlain, father of baby killed by dingo, dies

Michael Chamberlain, who waged a decades-long battle to prove his baby daughter was killed by a dingo in Australia's most notorious case of injustice, has died, his former wife said Tuesday. He was 72.

Chamberlain died suddenly, his ex-wife, Lindy Chamberlain, said in a statement. Michael Chamberlain's longtime friend and former lawyer, Stuart Tipple, told Australia's Fairfax Media that Michael died on Monday night as a result of complications from leukemia.

"I am on my way today to support and be with our children," Lindy said in a statement. "Given Michael's death was unexpected, I would ask that the media please consider that Michael's wife and all of his children are deeply grieving and need some space."

Lindy and Michael were wrongly convicted in the death of their 9-week-old daughter Azaria after the infant vanished from their tent during a 1980 camping trip to Uluru, the sacred monolith in Australia's Outback.

The mystery surrounding Azaria's disappearance was the most divisive and sensational legal drama in Australian history. It gained a place in global pop culture after Meryl Streep portrayed Lindy in the movie "A Cry in the Dark."

The Chamberlains insisted that a dingo snatched their daughter from the tent. But officials doubted the wild dogs were capable of carrying an infant. Instead, prosecutors argued that Lindy had slit her daughter's throat and buried her in the desert.

There were no witnesses, no motive and no body; Azaria's remains were never found. But in 1982, Lindy was nonetheless convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison. Michael was convicted of being an accessory after the fact and given a suspended sentence.

Three years later, Azaria's jacket was found in the desert near a dingo den and Lindy was quickly released from prison. A Royal Commission, the highest form of investigation in Australia, later debunked much of the forensic evidence used at trial and the Chamberlains' convictions were overturned. In 2012 — more than three decades after Azaria vanished — a coroner finally ruled that the infant had died as a result of a dingo attack.

The trial remains a source of shame for the many Australians who initially doubted the Chamberlains and cast Lindy as a villain largely due to her religious beliefs. Michael Chamberlain was a pastor with the Seventh-day Adventist church, a Protestant denomination that few Australians understood. Rumors flew that Lindy had killed her daughter as part of a grisly religious ritual.

Shortly before the coroner's ruling in 2012, Michael Chamberlain told The Associated Press that religious bigotry played a large role in the injustice he and his former wife suffered.

"The church got so smashed up, erroneously, and all through, really, a nasty dose of prejudice," Chamberlain told The AP. "I can say that I think our religion definitely impacted quite strongly on the attitude that many Australians developed."

Michael and Lindy divorced in 1991. He later married Ingrid Bergner, and went on to become an author and teacher.

Actor Sam Neill, who portrayed Michael in "A Cry in the Dark," said on Monday that the Chamberlains had been "terribly, cruelly wronged."

"Throughout their cruel ordeal & the years of injustice, (Michael) Chamberlain maintained that quiet unassuming dignity — an impressive man," Neill tweeted. "RIP."

Chamberlain, who was born in New Zealand, is survived by his wife and four children.

Clooney hopes Trump presidency won't spawn 'terrible things'

George Clooney didn't vote for Donald Trump and doesn't think he's the right choice to run the United States. But he hopes Trump succeeds in office.

"We have to hope that he can do a decent job, because when the president of the United States fails, really terrible things happen," Clooney said Monday at London reception for Syria rescue-workers documentary "The White Helmets."

Clooney, who supported Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in the presidential contest, said the United States has generally been lucky in its presidents.

"When we needed a first president, we had George Washington," he said. "We had Jefferson, Adams.

"When we had the Civil War, we had Lincoln," he added, rattling off other office-holders — Roosevelt, Kennedy — before suggesting that the U.S. "got a little unlucky" with the George W. Bush presidency in the years after 9/11.

"I think we're going to be a little unlucky now," Clooney said. "I can only hope for the best."

The actor defended fellow star Meryl Streep after she took aim at the president-elect in a speech at Sunday night's Golden Globe Awards.

In reply, Trump tweeted that Streep was "overrated" and a "flunky" of Clinton.

Clooney said that "I support her right forever" to speak out.

Clooney's production company is working on a feature-film version of the story of the Syrian Civil Defense "White Helmets," search-and-rescue teams who have gained international recognition for rescuing people from bombed-out buildings in the Syrian city of Aleppo.

He and his lawyer wife, Amal Clooney, have given their support to the Netflix-backed documentary, which is on the 10-strong Academy Awards shortlist for best documentary short.

Clooney said that as a celebrity, "I can't change policy ... but I can make things louder.

"The White Helmets are the heroes. So if I can help them out at all, and people can know about it, in any way possible, that's a good use of celebrity, I think."

Overrated or not, Streep's speech has galvanizing effect

Speaking in a hoarse voice that quivered with emotion, Meryl Streep silenced a boisterous Golden Globes crowd and sparked a clamor heard around the country, all the way to Trump Tower.

Streep's impassioned speech against Donald Trump while accepting the Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement award at Sunday's awards has been heard like a battle cry in a left-leaning Hollywood that has been trying to reconcile itself to a Trump presidency it overwhelmingly didn't vote for. Her speech has also further intensified the divide between Hollywood and Trump supporters, who call Streep another example of media elite on a soapbox.

Though Trump is yet to take office, the arts and the President-elect are increasingly on a collision course. Trump has criticized the cast of "Hamilton," which voiced its concerns about inclusion to Vice President-elect Mike Pence when he went to see the show on Broadway. Seeing political parallels in its story of underdog rebellion, some Trump supporters called for a boycott of the "Star Wars" film "Rogue One." And now, following Streep's remarks, he on Monday called the most decorated actress in Hollywood "overrated," even though he in 2015 called her one of his favorites actresses and "a fine person, too."

With such institutions as "Star Wars" and Streep in the crosshairs, the culture wars have gone nuclear. Battle lines and boycotts are being formed ahead of the Jan. 20 Inauguration, at which some entertainers have refused to perform. Some conservatives have already vowed on social media not to watch the Feb. 26th Academy Awards, which promises to be rife with political protest.

How the growing discord will affect the tenor in the arts for the next four years remains to be seen. But what was clear Monday in the wake of Streep's galvanizing speech is that the clash is just getting started. In a night where the song-and-dance ode to musicals "La La Land" set a Globes record with seven wins, including best picture, musical or comedy, Streep's speech had the largest impact.

"There has never been anyone like Meryl," applauded Ellen DeGeneres on Twitter. "I've never admired you more!" tweeted Sally Field. "Nearly without voice, her voice has never been so strong," lauded Sharon Stone. "Thank you, Meryl," wrote director Darren Aronofsky.

George Clooney at a screening Monday in London defended Streep's right to speak her mind: "It's her right, and I support her right forever — as much as it's everyone else's right to say she can't say it."

Political speeches at an award show — a little-loved, often ridiculed tradition — have seldom reverberated so strongly. Streep largely argued for empathy, inclusivity and the arts. And she claimed Hollywood wasn't a bastion of elites, but "a bunch of people from other places." Streep didn't use Trump's name, but spoke directly about him.

"It kind of broke my heart when I saw it," Streep said of Trump's mocking of a disabled reporter during the campaign . "I still can't get it out of my head because it wasn't in a movie, it was real life. And this instinct to humiliate, when it's modeled by someone in the public platform, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody's life, because it kind of gives permission for other people to do the same thing. Disrespect invites disrespect. Violence incites violence. When the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose."

She also urged support for the Committee to Protect Journalists , a media advocacy group, "because we're gonna need them going forward and they'll need us to safeguard the truth." On Monday, Joel Simon, executive director of the CPJ, said Streep's comments inspired "a huge upsurge" in donations and awareness.

"We received 500 donations last night and a couple hundred more this morning," said Simon, who said the ongoing donations totaled about $60,000 as of early Monday afternoon. "People are feeling very energized and impassioned."

Conservative pundits, though, saw Streep's speech as a reflection of the bicoastal liberal pomposity that Trump's election was in part a rejection of, regardless of his own show business affiliations. "This is exactly why Hollywood is dying, what a bunch of hypocrites," said Fox's Sean Hannity. "The Meryl Streep speech is why Trump won," said Meghan McCain, also a Fox personality. "And if people in Hollywood don't start recognizing why and how — you will help him get re-elected."

Early Monday morning came Trump's tweets. He called Streep, a longtime and outspoken Democrat who stumped for Hillary Clinton at the Democratic National Convention and famously imitated Trump at a Clinton fundraiser, "a Hillary flunky who lost big." He called the allegation that he mocked a disabled reporter "more very dishonest media."

The tweets provoked their own response. Soon, lists of other things that Trump finds "overrated" were trending. Author Stephen King called his comments about Streep "childish, churlish, petulant ... exactly why most Americans fear his presidency."

At the White House, press secretary Josh Earnest said that Streep had clearly delivered "a thoughtful, carefully considered message" that reflected her deeply held beliefs.

"It seemed to me to be a fairly straightforward exercise of her First Amendment rights, as this is the United States," Earnest said.

The Globes telecast drew 20 million viewers on NBC, according to the Nielsen company, an 8 percent increase from last year. It's a positive sign for the Academy Awards, which will hope political debate fuels interest in this year's ceremony, to be hosted by ABC's Jimmy Kimmel — rather than turns off viewers whose views don't align with Hollywood's.

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Associated Press reporters Josh Lederman in Washington and Jill Lawless in London contributed to this story.

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Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakcoyleAP

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