Now Playing
B985 FM
Last Song Played
80s 90s & NOW
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
B985 FM
Last Song Played
80s 90s & NOW

entertainment

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >

'Batman v Superman,' 'Zoolander 2' lead Razzie nominations

The much-derided superhero clash "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice" and the far-too-late comedy sequel "Zoolander 2" are the leading nominees for the 37th annual Razzie Awards.

"Zoolander 2" drew nine nods and "Batman v Superman" landed eight in nominations announced Monday for the worst films and performances of 2016. Both are up for worst picture, along with "Gods of Egypt," ''Independence Day: Resurgence," ''Dirty Grandpa" and the political documentary "Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party."

Many nominees are typically acclaimed performers, including Robert De Niro ("Dirty Grandpa"), Naomi Watts ("Divergent Series: Allegiant" and "Shut-In"), Kristen Wiig ("Zoolander"), Johnny Depp ("Alice Through the Looking Glass"), Will Ferrell ("Zoolander 2"), Ben Affleck ("Batman v Superman") and Julia Roberts ("Mother's Day").

"Winners" will be announced Feb. 25.

'Batman v Superman,' 'Zoolander 2' lead Razzie nominations

The much-derided superhero clash "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice" and the far-too-late comedy sequel "Zoolander 2" are the leading nominees for the 37th annual Razzie Awards.

"Zoolander 2" drew nine nods and "Batman v Superman" landed eight in nominations announced Monday for the worst films and performances of 2016. Both are up for worst picture, along with "Gods of Egypt," ''Independence Day: Resurgence," ''Dirty Grandpa" and the political documentary "Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party."

Many nominees are typically acclaimed performers, including Robert De Niro ("Dirty Grandpa"), Naomi Watts ("Divergent Series: Allegiant" and "Shut-In"), Kristen Wiig ("Zoolander"), Johnny Depp ("Alice Through the Looking Glass"), Will Ferrell ("Zoolander 2"), Ben Affleck ("Batman v Superman") and Julia Roberts ("Mother's Day").

"Winners" will be announced Feb. 25.

Book Review: "Fatal" by John Lescroart

A stupid mistake has serious ramifications in "Fatal," John Lescroart's latest stand-alone thriller.

Kate Jameson loves her life and marriage to Ron. She has two children, and her best friend for over 20 years is Beth, a San Francisco police detective. At a dinner party she meets another couple, Peter and Jill. For some reason she becomes obsessed with Peter. Kate tries to bury it, but the desire is too strong and she arranges a meeting with him in a hotel. They have a passionate encounter and then walk away from each other.

Soon after the liaison, Kate is sitting with Beth in a cafe when a man walks in with a gun. The events that happen and the aftermath will echo not only with Kate and Beth, but also with the people they care about.

Six months after the tragedy, Beth receives a case where a man's body washes up on the beach. The dead man is Peter.

A story of normal people making insane decisions while trying to hide infidelity could easily get steered in the wrong direction and make the characters too unlikeable. Due to a sudden lack in judgment, everyone close becomes embroiled in the web of deceit that is necessary to keep the truth quiet.

Somehow Lescroart weaves this moral ambiguity into a tale that is both frustrating and gratifying. His writing is constantly surprising, and the ending is perfect. Fans will not miss his regular series characters, while those who have never read his novels will discover a true master of the craft.

___

Online:

http://www.johnlescroart.com/

Win Tickets to “Train: Play That Song Tour”

This week, Tad and Melissa have your chance to win a pair of tickets for Train: Play That Song Tour with O.A.R., Natasha Bedingfield, at Lakewood Amphitheatre on Friday, June 2… BEFORE you can buy them! Dial 404-741-0985 when you hear the cue to call, for you chance to score tickets.

 

Tickets on sale Friday, January 27 at 10am at LiveNation.com

Influential Estonian choral composer Veljo Tormis dead at 86

Veljo Tormis, a prolific Estonian composer whose innovative choral works helped propel his Baltic nation's drive to restore independence, has died at the age of 86.

Tormis died Saturday from long-term illnesses in the Estonian capital, Tallinn, Mariliis Rebane of the Estonian Composers' Union told the AP.

Tormis was considered a national icon in Estonia where choral music has been central to the culture going back to hundreds of years under Swedish and German rule.

Estonia's budding independence drive in the 1980s was dubbed the Singing Revolution for the massive and peaceful rallies when crowds often sang in old-form, chanting styles popularized by Tormis.

Tormis' haunting yet beautiful a cappella compositions typically incorporated a chanting, runic style that conjured up images of shamans and now-forgotten ancient peoples along the Baltic Sea shores.

His works garnered international acclaim after Estonia regained independence in 1991, with choirs from Korea to the United States performing his music.

Tormis' best known and most performed work, "Curse Upon Iron," became an unexpected staple in an unexpected place: The Oregon City High School in suburban Portland. Amy Aamodt, the school choir director at the time, explained how the choir first took on the difficult piece around 2010 with hesitancy as they sang in the original Estonian — but then quickly became enthralled.

"Even when we were learning his music, I would look up and there would be tears in the kids' eyes. ... Something just clicked about his music," an emotional Aamodt said in a phone interview Monday after learning from a reporter about the composer's death. "The piece was so much deeper than any of us could have imagined."

"Curse Upon Iron" is an ode to the horrors of war written for choir and hoop drum in which singers are instructed in the score to spin, crouch and shriek at points, adding to its power. The Estonian lyrics speak of the curse of war and its weapons: "Wretched iron! ... You flesh eater, gnawer of bones!"

The effect when the student choir performed the work, even though the words were foreign to everyone in the audience, was universal, recalled Aamodt.

"I would look out — and the parents were crying," she said.

Soft-spoken and modest, Tormis described his compositions as keeping alive the memories of ancient peoples, whose cultures and languages have long since died.

"It is not I who makes use of folk music. It is folk music that makes use of me," he was quoted as saying on several of his albums.

Born Aug. 7, 1930, Tormis got his diploma from the Moscow Conservatoire in 1956, wrote symphonic music and other mainstream forms early in his career, but increasingly focused on ancient forms after researching music going back centuries of the Estonians and Finns, as well their lesser-known relatives, such as the Liivs and Ingrians.

Tormis is survived by his wife, Lea, and one son, Tonu.

___

Oregon City High School Performance of Tormis' "Curse Upon Iron": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpVfyCnaCS8

___

Tarm, formerly AP's correspondent in Estonia, contributed from Chicago.

Tripp West has your tickets to see Carmina Burana

At Work Perk: Atlanta Ballet’s Carmina Burana

Listen to Tripp West this week for your chance to win a family four pack of tickets to Atlanta Ballet’s Carmina Burana at the Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre. Atlanta Ballet presents a lush, modern reimagining of the classic parable in which the pleasures of the flesh challenge the resolve of three young seminarians. Set to Carl Orff’s masterful score, David Bintley’s Carmina Burana is a hypnotic feast for the senses. Bold, sensual, and a bit cheeky, this production is perfect for a pre-Valentine’s date night. 

 

David Bintley’s Carmina Burana is at at the Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre, February 3-11. Get info and tickets at atlantaballet.com

on-air contests runs 1/23-1/27.

Lewis receives 4 literary awards for 'March: Book Three'

Rep. John Lewis is having quite a run in the literary world.

The American Library Association announced Monday that the Georgia Democrat received a record four prizes for "March: Book Three," the last of a graphic trilogy about his civil-rights activism and winner last fall of the National Book Award for young people's literature. The latest honors for "March," a collaboration among Lewis, congressional aide Andrew Aydin and illustrator Nate Powell, include the Coretta Scott King award for best children's book by an African-American and the Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in children's literature. The book recently reached high on best-seller lists after a harsh public exchange between Lewis and President Donald Trump, whose legitimacy Lewis has challenged.

Monday's top award, the John Newbery Medal for outstanding children's book overall, was given to Kelly Barnhill for her fairy tale about an abandoned baby with a crescent-shaped birthmark on her forehead, "The Girl Who Drank the Moon." The Randolph Caldecott Medal for best picture book went to "Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat," illustrated and written by Javaka Steptoe, which also won the Coretta Scott King award for best illustration. The Newbery and Caldecott prizes are the most prestigious in children's literature, with previous winners including Beverly Cleary, Neil Gaiman and Katherine Paterson.

The awards were announced during the library association's midwinter meeting in Atlanta, where Lewis is based. The congressman's late wife, Lillian Miles Lewis, was a librarian at Atlanta University.

Rick Riordan, author of the million-selling "Percy Jackson" books, won the Stonewall award for "Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard: The Hammer of Thor." The Stonewall is given for the best book relating to the LGBT experience. Sarah Dessen, known for such favorites as "Dreamland" and "Along for the Ride," and Nikki Grimes, whose books include the prize winners "Bronx Masquerade" and "Words With Wings," each received lifetime achievement awards.

Juana Medina's "Juana & Lucas" won the Pura Belpre award for best book by a Latino writer and "Lowriders to the Center of the Earth," illustrated by Raul Gonzalez, was the Pura Belpre winner for best illustration.

Lewis receives 4 literary awards for 'March: Book Three'

Rep. John Lewis is having quite a run in the literary world.

The American Library Association announced Monday that the Georgia Democrat received a record four prizes for "March: Book Three," the last of a graphic trilogy about his civil-rights activism and winner last fall of the National Book Award for young people's literature. The latest honors for "March," a collaboration among Lewis, congressional aide Andrew Aydin and illustrator Nate Powell, include the Coretta Scott King award for best children's book by an African-American and the Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in children's literature. The book recently reached high on best-seller lists after a harsh public exchange between Lewis and President Donald Trump, whose legitimacy Lewis has challenged.

Monday's top award, the John Newbery Medal for outstanding children's book overall, was given to Kelly Barnhill for her fairy tale about an abandoned baby with a crescent-shaped birthmark on her forehead, "The Girl Who Drank the Moon." The Randolph Caldecott Medal for best picture book went to "Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat," illustrated and written by Javaka Steptoe, which also won the Coretta Scott King award for best illustration. The Newbery and Caldecott prizes are the most prestigious in children's literature, with previous winners including Beverly Cleary, Neil Gaiman and Katherine Paterson.

The awards were announced during the library association's midwinter meeting in Atlanta, where Lewis is based. The congressman's late wife, Lillian Miles Lewis, was a librarian at Atlanta University.

Rick Riordan, author of the million-selling "Percy Jackson" books, won the Stonewall award for "Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard: The Hammer of Thor." The Stonewall is given for the best book relating to the LGBT experience. Sarah Dessen, known for such favorites as "Dreamland" and "Along for the Ride," and Nikki Grimes, whose books include the prize winners "Bronx Masquerade" and "Words With Wings," each received lifetime achievement awards.

Juana Medina's "Juana & Lucas" won the Pura Belpre award for best book by a Latino writer and "Lowriders to the Center of the Earth," illustrated by Raul Gonzalez, was the Pura Belpre winner for best illustration.

US Supreme Court won't hear 'Sister Wives' bigamy law appeal

The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday it won't hear an appeal from the family on TV's "Sister Wives" challenging Utah's law banning polygamy.

The decision ends the family's long legal fight to overturn a seldom used and unique provision of Utah's law that the Browns and other polygamous families contend has a chilling effect by sending law-abiding plural families into hiding because of fear of prosecution.

The provision bars married people from living with a second purported "spiritual spouse" even if the man is legally married to just one woman, making it stricter than anti-bigamy laws in other states.

The reality TLC cable channel TV show follows the lives of Kody Brown, his four wives and all their children. When it debuted in 2010, it was considered ground-breaking by offering viewers a glimpse into how a plural family navigates the unique complexities of the arrangement.

Utah prosecutors say they generally leave polygamists alone but that they need the ban to pursue polygamists for other crimes such as underage marriage and sexual assault. Only 10 people were charged with violating the law between 2001 and 2011, prosecutors say.

The Utah Attorney General's Office declined comment on the Supreme Court's denial of the case, which the justices issued without comment.

The saga between the Browns and Utah officials began in September 2010 when the first episode aired of the TLC show, "Sister Wives." A county prosecutor opened an investigation, leading the Browns to leave their longtime of Lehi, Utah, in 2011, to settle in Las Vegas where they still live today.

That same year, the Browns filed a lawsuit calling the opening of the investigation government abuse. The case was closed without filing any charges.

In 2013, the Browns scored a key legal victory when a federal judge in Utah ruled the law violated polygamists' right to privacy and religious freedom.

But an appeals court in Denver decided last year that the Browns could not sue because they were not charged under the Utah law. It did not consider the constitutional issues. That ruling will now stand.

The Brown's attorney, Jonathan Turley, said in a statement posted on his blog that he and the family are disappointed but not surprised because the high court is on a pace to hear less than 1 percent of the 7,500 appeals it is likely to receive this term.

Turley emphasized that an appeals court ruling was not made based on the merits of the Browns' assertion that Utah's law violates their rights of speech and religion.

"Our victory in Salt Lake City will remain as a cautionary decision for legislators who wish to marginalize or sanction this community in the future," Turley said. "It has been a long road for all of us and it is not the end of the road. Plural and unconventional families will continue to strive for equal status and treatment under the law."

Kody Brown is legally married to Robyn Brown, but says he is "spiritually married" to three other women. They live together in a plural relationship and belong to a religious group that believes in polygamy as a core religious practice. Their show continues to air on TLC.

About 30,000 polygamists live in Utah, according to court documents. The mainstream Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints abandoned the practice in 1890 and strictly prohibits it today.

___

This story has been corrected to show Kody Brown is now legally married to Robyn Brown, not Meri Brown.

US Supreme Court won't hear 'Sister Wives' bigamy law appeal

The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday it won't hear an appeal from the family on TV's "Sister Wives" challenging Utah's law banning polygamy.

The decision ends the family's long legal fight to overturn a seldom used and unique provision of Utah's law that the Browns and other polygamous families contend has a chilling effect by sending law-abiding plural families into hiding because of fear of prosecution.

The provision bars married people from living with a second purported "spiritual spouse" even if the man is legally married to just one woman, making it stricter than anti-bigamy laws in other states.

The reality TLC cable channel TV show follows the lives of Kody Brown, his four wives and all their children. When it debuted in 2010, it was considered ground-breaking by offering viewers a glimpse into how a plural family navigates the unique complexities of the arrangement.

Utah prosecutors say they generally leave polygamists alone but that they need the ban to pursue polygamists for other crimes such as underage marriage and sexual assault. Only 10 people were charged with violating the law between 2001 and 2011, prosecutors say.

The Utah Attorney General's Office declined comment on the Supreme Court's denial of the case, which the justices issued without comment.

The saga between the Browns and Utah officials began in September 2010 when the first episode aired of the TLC show, "Sister Wives." A county prosecutor opened an investigation, leading the Browns to leave their longtime of Lehi, Utah, in 2011, to settle in Las Vegas where they still live today.

That same year, the Browns filed a lawsuit calling the opening of the investigation government abuse. The case was closed without filing any charges.

In 2013, the Browns scored a key legal victory when a federal judge in Utah ruled the law violated polygamists' right to privacy and religious freedom.

But an appeals court in Denver decided last year that the Browns could not sue because they were not charged under the Utah law. It did not consider the constitutional issues. That ruling will now stand.

The Brown's attorney, Jonathan Turley, said in a statement posted on his blog that he and the family are disappointed but not surprised because the high court is on a pace to hear less than 1 percent of the 7,500 appeals it is likely to receive this term.

Turley emphasized that an appeals court ruling was not made based on the merits of the Browns' assertion that Utah's law violates their rights of speech and religion.

"Our victory in Salt Lake City will remain as a cautionary decision for legislators who wish to marginalize or sanction this community in the future," Turley said. "It has been a long road for all of us and it is not the end of the road. Plural and unconventional families will continue to strive for equal status and treatment under the law."

Kody Brown is legally married to Robyn Brown, but says he is "spiritually married" to three other women. They live together in a plural relationship and belong to a religious group that believes in polygamy as a core religious practice. Their show continues to air on TLC.

About 30,000 polygamists live in Utah, according to court documents. The mainstream Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints abandoned the practice in 1890 and strictly prohibits it today.

___

This story has been corrected to show Kody Brown is now legally married to Robyn Brown, not Meri Brown.

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >