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'Love Connection' to reconnect with viewers as Fox revival

"Love Connection" is reconnecting with viewers. A new version of the match-making game show will air on Fox starting May 25, the network announced Thursday.

The one-hour series will amp up the original dating show for today's audiences, featuring single men and women looking for romance. Its host is Andy Cohen, of Bravo's "Watch What Happens Live," who will bring his personal brand of audacious fun to the series, Fox said.

This edition revives one of TV's most popular syndicated game-show hits. The original "Love Connection" aired from 1983 to 1994, with Chuck Woolery hosting.

This New Treatment Could Make Your Cells Look Young Again

The anti-aging treatment could even be used to keep astronauts healthy on deep space missions.

US actor Gere compares West Bank town to 'Old South'

Actor Richard Gere has compared life for Palestinians in the West Bank city of Hebron to segregation in the United States.

The "Pretty Woman" star toured Hebron this week with Breaking the Silence, a group of Israeli ex-soldiers who criticize Israeli policies in the West Bank.

During the visit, Gere said "it's exactly what the Old South was in America," according to a clip aired Wednesday by Israel's Channel 2 TV.

About 850 Israeli settlers in Hebron live in heavily-guarded enclaves, surrounded by tens of thousands of Palestinians.

Much of the animosity in the biblical city is over a holy site known to Jews as the Tomb of the Patriarchs and to Muslims as the Ibrahimi Mosque. The city has been a flashpoint in the recent wave of Israeli-Palestinian violence.

US actor Gere compares West Bank town to 'Old South'

Actor Richard Gere has compared life for Palestinians in the West Bank city of Hebron to segregation in the United States.

The "Pretty Woman" star toured Hebron this week with Breaking the Silence, a group of Israeli ex-soldiers who criticize Israeli policies in the West Bank.

During the visit, Gere said "it's exactly what the Old South was in America," according to a clip aired Wednesday by Israel's Channel 2 TV.

About 850 Israeli settlers in Hebron live in heavily-guarded enclaves, surrounded by tens of thousands of Palestinians.

Much of the animosity in the biblical city is over a holy site known to Jews as the Tomb of the Patriarchs and to Muslims as the Ibrahimi Mosque. The city has been a flashpoint in the recent wave of Israeli-Palestinian violence.

Former Boston drummer Sib Hashian dies at age 67 on cruise

John "Sib" Hashian, former drummer for the arena rock band Boston, died on board a cruise ship Wednesday. He was 67.

His son, Adam Hashian, said Thursday a cause of death had not yet been determined.

Hashian was listed as one of the featured performers on the Legends of Rock Cruise, which departed from Miami on Saturday and was scheduled to visit Puerto Rico and the Bahamas.

Hashian played on Boston's first two hit records, their self-titled debut album in 1976, featuring the hit song "More Than a Feeling," and the 1978 followup, "Don't Look Back." The original band, made up of Tom Scholz, Brad Delp, Barry Goudreau, Fran Sheehan and Hashian, had one of the most successful debut records in history, selling over 17 million copies, with the singles "Long Time" and "Peace of Mind."

His wife, Suzanne Hashian, said in a statement that arrangements would be made at a later date.

Dylan gives rare interview, talks Sinatra, Elvis

Bob Dylan opened up about his music and songwriting and discussed his relationships with Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley and others in a rare and lengthy interview posted exclusively to his website Wednesday.

In the Q&A with author Bill Flanagan , Dylan recalled Sinatra telling him, "'You and me, pal, we got blue eyes, we're from up there ... These other bums are from down here.'"

"I remember thinking that he might be right," added Dylan, who last year was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature, but did not show up to accept the award.

A person close to the Dylan camp, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the person was not allowed to publicly talk about the topic, said Dylan wanted to do an interview for his website and Flanagan, a writer and former MTV executive, agreed to do it.

"No money or other compensation was involved," the person said.

Of the many superstars who died last year, including Muhammad Ali and Merle Haggard, Dylan said in the interview the deaths hit him hard.

"We were like brothers, we lived on the same street and they all left empty spaces where they used to stand. It's lonesome without them," he said.

When asked about why Presley didn't show up for a recording session with Dylan and George Harrison, he replied: "He did show up — it was us that didn't."

Dylan, 75, said he was also a fan of Amy Winehouse, who died of alcohol poisoning in 2011 at age 27.

"She was the last real individualist around," he said.

Dylan will release a new triple disc album of standards called "Triplicate" on March 31. He said he's a fan of somewhat recent albums from Iggy Pop (2012's "Apres"), Imelda May, Valerie June and The Stereophonics. He also said he enjoyed "Here We Go Again: Celebrating the Genius of Ray Charles," the 2011 tribute album by Willie Nelson and Wynton Marsalis featuring several tracks with Norah Jones.

___

Online:

Full interview with Bob Dylan: http://www.bobdylan.com/news/qa-with-bill-flanagan/

Dylan gives rare interview, talks Sinatra, Elvis

Bob Dylan opened up about his music and songwriting and discussed his relationships with Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley and others in a rare and lengthy interview posted exclusively to his website Wednesday.

In the Q&A with author Bill Flanagan , Dylan recalled Sinatra telling him, "'You and me, pal, we got blue eyes, we're from up there ... These other bums are from down here.'"

"I remember thinking that he might be right," added Dylan, who last year was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature, but did not show up to accept the award.

A person close to the Dylan camp, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the person was not allowed to publicly talk about the topic, said Dylan wanted to do an interview for his website and Flanagan, a writer and former MTV executive, agreed to do it.

"No money or other compensation was involved," the person said.

Of the many superstars who died last year, including Muhammad Ali and Merle Haggard, Dylan said in the interview the deaths hit him hard.

"We were like brothers, we lived on the same street and they all left empty spaces where they used to stand. It's lonesome without them," he said.

When asked about why Presley didn't show up for a recording session with Dylan and George Harrison, he replied: "He did show up — it was us that didn't."

Dylan, 75, said he was also a fan of Amy Winehouse, who died of alcohol poisoning in 2011 at age 27.

"She was the last real individualist around," he said.

Dylan will release a new triple disc album of standards called "Triplicate" on March 31. He said he's a fan of somewhat recent albums from Iggy Pop (2012's "Apres"), Imelda May, Valerie June and The Stereophonics. He also said he enjoyed "Here We Go Again: Celebrating the Genius of Ray Charles," the 2011 tribute album by Willie Nelson and Wynton Marsalis featuring several tracks with Norah Jones.

___

Online:

Full interview with Bob Dylan: http://www.bobdylan.com/news/qa-with-bill-flanagan/

Suspect In Jewish Community Center Bomb Threats Arrested In Israel

Another suspect has been arrested in connection with a series of bomb threats against Jewish community centers and other institutions.

Review: Big-screen 'CHIPS' a tawdry, sexist disappointment

Reimagined by writer, director, producer and star Dax Shepard, the big-screen "CHIPS " is a tawdry, testosterone-fueled tale built around penis jokes and endless evaluation of women's appearances.

The two main characters discuss the looks of almost every woman on screen. Calling someone "a 2" might be a forgivable comic misstep, but making such remarks a major part of a movie's humor is reductive and gross, not to mention outdated and uninspired. Maybe you need to look like Kristen Bell (Shepard's wife, in real life and this film) or have a Y chromosome to find it funny.

News flash: Women don't exist to be beautiful for men. Doesn't everyone know that in 2017 — particularly Shepard, who has two young daughters?

The best thing about "CHIPS" is some classic Southern California scenery and superb motorcycle riding, complete with stairwell tricks, airborne stunts and long shots of that beloved mecca for local bikers, Angeles Crest Highway.

But overall, the film is an uncomfortable eye-roll. Shepard and co-star Michael Pena have plenty of charm, but not enough to support the feeble story and tasteless jokes.

The film opens with the words "The California Highway Patrol does not endorse this film — at all," and it's easy to see why.

Shepard is Jon Baker, a former motocross champ trying to reinvent himself and save his marriage by joining the CHP. The 40-year-old rookie is paired with Frank "Ponch" Poncherello (Pena), an FBI agent working undercover to root out potentially crooked officers within the CHP. But this Jon and Ponch are so inept, so distracted by hot chicks and pseudo-philosophical conversations about "homophobia" and "closure," that buying them as actual law enforcement is too much of a stretch. They're more like frat guys doing cosplay.

And guy humor is one thing, but this is just dumb. One repeated gag involves Shepard in his underpants and Pena's discomfort at being around his near-naked partner. "You face-planted my bag!" Jon says to Ponch.

That kind of low-brow stupidity could be redeemed by a strong story or well-developed characters, but "CHIPS" offers neither. Ponch and Jon are caricatures, and even the crime they're investigating lacks punch because the crooked cops' motivations are never explained.

And the objectification of women here is brutal. There are several close-ups of women's butts in yoga pants, and Ponch openly lusts after them — so much that it's a problem and he has to quickly steal away to masturbate. I'm not kidding. Even the CHP chief, played by Jane Kaczmarek, is reduced to an object: Ponch and Jon discuss her body ("It was tight") after Ponch discovers she's secretly sex-crazed. (Of course she is.)

Only Maya Rudolph, who makes a brief cameo to reunite with her "Idiocracy" co-star, escapes objectification. She is just a police officer who happens to be female. Josh Duhamel and the original Ponch, Erik Estrada, also make cameos, though unfortunately Estrada gets in on the lady lust.

Made before the U.S. elected a president whose crude, caught-on-tape remarks regarding women inspired a nationwide conversation about "locker-room talk," there's no shortage of a "locker-room" tone toward women in "CHIPS." That's not just tired and unfunny, it's potentially alienating to half the population.

The TV series was from a different era, to be sure, but affording basic respect regardless of someone's looks or gender is timeless.

"CHIPS," a Warner Bros. Pictures release, is rated R by the Motion Picture Association of America for "crude sexual content, graphic nudity, pervasive language, some violence and drug use. Running time: 101 minutes. One star out of four.

___

MPAA Definition of R: Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy .

This Bee Species Is Finally Listed As Endangered

The rusty patched bumblebee is the first bee in the contiguous 48 states to be given federal protection.
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