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Meghan Markle appears at Prince Harry's Invictus Games

Prince Harry's girlfriend, American actress Meghan Markle, sat in the stands for Saturday's opening ceremony of his Invictus Games for wounded veterans in her first appearance at a public event with him.

They were not sitting together at the Air Canada Centre. They were about four rows apart but Harry looked over at her when the Canadian anthem played. A security guard blocked at least one fan from taking pictures of Markle, who sat with friend Markus Anderson, a party consultant.

Markle lives in Toronto, but hadn't appeared with Harry since he arrived in the city. She recently told Vanity Fair they're in love. The 36-year-old actress was wearing a burgundy leather jacket over a dark dress. She is known for her portrayal of a paralegal in the television show "Suits."

The Invictus Games are the creation of Prince Harry, who got the inspiration to help wounded and sick military personnel and their families after his two tours of duty in Afghanistan. This is the third Invictus Games.

"I hope you are ready for some fierce competition," Harry said to the crowd and wounded athletes. "You are all winners. You are all Invictus. Let's get started."

Markle smiled broadly when Harry spoke and raised her hands to her face and laughed when he mangled a line in French. She left right after his speech.

About 550 competitors from 17 countries are slated to compete in 12 sports over the next week. U.S. First Lady Melania Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also attended the opening ceremony.

Bruce Springsteen and Bryan Adams will perform at the closing ceremony next Saturday.

U.S. Master Sgt. Brian Williams, who had his left leg amputated at the knee because of an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan in 2012, said Harry is living up to the legacy of his late mother Diana with his charity work.

"He's following in his mother footsteps. Straight up," Williams said.

Williams said he has a lot of respect for Harry, a former soldier who served in Afghanistan. "He doesn't have to do this but he is," he said.

Williams was working as a dog handler during his second deployment in Afghanistan when he was severely injured while clearing a Taliban compound. Despite his injuries he has worked hard to stay on active duty. He also competed in last year's Invictus Games in Orlando and he's taking part in wheelchair basketball and sitting volleyball this year.

Canadian Melanie Harris is set to compete in bioarchery. Harris did two tours of duty in Afghanistan with the Canadian military. She would help carry bring in wounded soldiers to the medical facilities on base. She has since struggled with post-traumatic stress disorder.

"I was living without passion, without purpose. I needed to believe in myself again and I needed to be inspired. And these Invictus Games that's what they did," Harris said.

Demi Lovato to help war-scarred children in Iraq

Demi Lovato was named a Global Citizen ambassador at the organization's annual music festival Saturday, championing the mental health of thousands of children displaced within Iraq and other vulnerable communities.

The singer and Global Citizen will fund the expansion of a Save the Children pilot program, Healing and Education through the Arts, to violence-scarred young people living in Iraq's Kirkuk and Salah al Din areas.

"Ending the stigma around mental health conditions and supporting internally displaced children to build physical and mental resilience through education and access to justice is not a choice, it needs to happen, and it needs to happen now," the singer said onstage in Central Park.

Since 2014, more than 3 million people in Iraq have been displaced within the country due to war and conflict. Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children, told the festival crowd the organization's HEART program will allow displaced children scarred by the violence to process trauma "through drawing, painting, music and other art forms" as a way to begin healing and "rebuild their self-confidence and trust in others."

Lovato has been a strong advocate for mental health issues after sharing her own struggles with eating disorders, substance abuse and a bipolar diagnosis.

Soul singer Charles Bradley dead at 68

Charles Bradley, known as the "Screaming Eagle of Soul" for a powerful, raspy style that evoked one of his musical heroes, James Brown, died Saturday at age 68.

Bradley, who achieved success later in life with his 2011 debut album "No Time for Dreaming," was diagnosed with stomach cancer in the fall of 2016 and underwent treatment, according to a statement from his publicist Shazila Mohammed. He headed out to tour earlier this year after receiving a clean bill of health, but the cancer returned recently, spreading to his liver, the statement said.

Recording on the Daptone label, Bradley was a fiery live performer. He followed up his first album with "Victim of Love" in 2013. His third album, "Changes," was released last year.

Among his TV appearances was a stop last year on "CBS This Morning: Saturday," which earned him an Emmy nomination.

Born in Gainesville, Florida, Bradley found himself living in New York at age 8. He left home as a teenager and lived as an itinerant until he settled in Brooklyn 20 years ago.

Bradley idolized Brown, working as a Brown impersonator known as Black Velvet before he was discovered by Gabriel Roth, a Daptone co-founder. He later became known for closing shows under his own name with hugs for his audiences.

"The world lost a ton of heart today," Roth said in the statement. "Charles was somehow one of the meekest and strongest people I've ever known. His pain was a cry for universal love and humanity. His soulful moans and screams will echo forever on records and in the ears and hearts of those who were fortunate enough to share time with him."

Roth said he told Bradley recently there's solace to be found for fans knowing Bradley "will continue to inspire love and music in this world for generations to come."

Bradley's response? "I tried."

Megyn Kelly’s getting ready for new morning show, hopes for a Trump-free zone

Megyn Kelly says she left Fox News Channel to bring more joy to her life. NBC hopes that starting Monday, she can spread some to the network and its viewers.

The former Fox News Channel star and Donald Trump foil debuts her talk show at 9 a.m. EDT, nestled into the four-hour “Today” show block and competing in most of the country with Kelly Ripa and Ryan Seacrest’s “Live!”

>> Read more trending news

Kelly hosted a Sunday-night newsmagazine this summer to middling ratings, and it returns next spring. It’s the daily talk show, in the lucrative morning market, that will ultimately determine the wisdom of NBC News’ decision to hire her. She promises that “Megyn Kelly Today,” shown live with a studio audience, will be an information-packed hour with a sense of fun.

“It will be very similar to the ‘Today’ show, but we’re going to have a lot more elbow room,” she said in an interview.

Ellen DeGeneres initiated Kelly into daytime TV this week by having her awkwardly toss pizza dough, stuff herself into a fat suit and dance with the audience; Kelly smiled and played along. It was a long way from her Fox life of pressing the future president at debates, enduring his Twitter taunts and being the ringleader for an hour of politics each weeknight.

>> Related: Taron Hall developing new daytime show after leaving ‘Today’

The Trump trauma wasn’t why she left Fox, Kelly said. She compared it to her decision to abandon law to become a journalist and ending her first marriage: they weren’t bad experiences, but she knew there was something better.

The truth, Kelly said, is that she’s not a political junkie and cable television news is all about politics.

“I don’t want to talk about Trump all day,” she said. “In fact, the bar is very high for Trump coverage (on ‘Megyn Kelly Live’). If you want Trump, you can watch virtually every channel in the country and get Trump non-stop. I think people are looking for a break from that. Not just Trump, it’s inside the Beltway. I don’t want to talk about Mitch McConnell either, or Chuck Schumer or Nancy Pelosi.”

Live! With Kelly and Ryan” is a celebrity- and entertainment-oriented talk show. Kelly said her program will be uplifting and more substantive: recent trial runs had segments on reacting to the Equifax breach and protecting yourself from attack. Mental health, bullying, coping with divorce and tips for job interviews are the type of topics she’ll cover.

Not news, but not fluff, either.

Trying to imitate the formula of “Live!” would be a huge mistake given its success over decades, said Bill Carroll, a consultant and expert on the daytime TV market.

>> Related: ‘Clerks’ actress’s cause of death revealed four months after her passing

Name recognition, a consistent time slot across the country that makes the show easier to promote, and affiliation with the well-established “Today’ brand give Kelly some advantages, he said.

Read more here.

Colin Firth takes Italian citizenship after Brexit decision

British actor Colin Firth says he has taken Italian citizenship as a "sensible" move amid global political uncertainty.

Firth, who is married to environmentalist Livia Giuggioli, says he has become a dual U.K.-Italian citizen, and his wife is applying for British nationality. Their two sons already have dual citizenship.

In a statement Saturday, the 57-year-old Firth said he and his wife had never thought much about their different passports, "but now, with some of the uncertainty around, we thought it sensible that we should all get the same."

Firth has been quoted as calling Brexit a disaster.

The actor, who has played Mr. Darcy in "Pride and Prejudice" and King George VI in "The King's Speech," said he "will always be extremely British" but also has "a passionate love of Italy."

Aaron Carter checks into rehab after turbulent few months

Aaron Carter told his fans Friday night on Twitter that he would be “disappearing for a while.”

>> Read more trending news

The singer and former teen heartthrob Carter tweeted the news shortly after checking into rehab.

Carter’s publicist confirmed the news in a statement to People.

“Aaron has decided to enter a facility to improve his health and work on his overall wellness,” Carter’s representative Steve Honig said

“He is going to do this privately and focus all his attention on being the best person and performer possible. He is grateful for the support and love from his fans and looks forward to coming back stronger than ever before.”

“I would like to tell all of you that I will be disappearing for a while to work on myself,” Carter wrote in a note he shared on Twitter.

>> Related: Aaron Carter reveals he and brother Nick Carter still aren’t speaking after family fued goes public

Carter has been in the news fairly regularly recently. In August, he came out as bisexual, and earlier this month, the police were ere called to his house several times.

German plane hijacked to Somalia in 1977 brought back home

A Lufthansa passenger jet that was hijacked to Somalia 40 years ago at the height of a far-left militant group's campaign against West German authorities has returned home.

The dpa news agency reported that the Boeing 737 arrived Saturday in the German city of Friedrichshafen, where it will be reassembled and displayed at the Dornier Museum.

The parts arrived aboard two freight aircraft from Brazil. The aircraft ended up in a Brazilian carrier's fleet and had been sitting decommissioned at the country's Fortaleza Airport for years.

A Palestinian group demanding the release of members of West Germany's Red Army Faction hijacked a Mallorca-to-Frankfurt flight in October 1977. The hijacking marked the peak of the "German Autumn" of leftist violence.

German commandos stormed the plane in Mogadishu, Somalia, on Oct. 18, 1977. They killed three of the four hijackers and rescued all 86 passengers.

The Sun rises in new play about Murdoch's tabloid revolution

Rupert Murdoch has power, wealth — and legions of detractors, who say the media mogul's tabloids and TV stations have fueled crass celebrity culture, phone hacking and fake news.

A new play in London explores the roots of his success and his divisiveness. "Ink" shows how Murdoch revolutionized British journalism at the end of the 1960s, turning the failing Sun newspaper into the country's most influential tabloid through a canny mix of sin, sensation and sex.

Playwright James Graham says it's fascinating "to see the torment" on the faces of liberal theatergoers as they realize they are rooting for the Australian upstart.

"He's an enjoyable, mischievous, provocative voice in the play," Graham said.

"We want to subvert and disrupt and interrogate what that man did," he added. "He is a man who has had an incredible impact on all of our lives."

"Ink," which opened in the West End this week after a run at London's small Almeida Theatre, begins in 1969. It was a pre-digital era, when publishing a newspaper involved hot type, clanking presses and — to Murdoch's dismay — powerful trade unions.

The play conveys the gallows humor of journalists and the excitement of creating something new. Murdoch and Sun editor Larry Lamb shocked the stuffy, class-ridden newspaper business with a paper that embraced the populist delights of sports, television, sex and free giveaways.

Actor Richard Coyle, who plays Lamb, said the play had made him "look more fondly on the Sun than I did before. It had noble intentions in many ways, to begin with."

In the play, Murdoch sums up his intentions as "give people what they want ... and to hell with the consequences."

"Ink" explores some of those consequences, on individuals and on a society undergoing rapid change.

Bertie Carvel, who plays Murdoch with nervous charm and fizzing energy, said it's a play "about individualism versus collectivism."

"The 60s was such an amazing decade, everything was changing, and Larry is like a surfer on a wave of change and iconoclasm," said Carvel. "Murdoch sets him this kind of visionary task, then Larry — channeling everything that the 60s has to offer — takes that and does his thing with it."

Lamb, who led the Sun for nine years, died in 2000. Murdoch, now 86 and still atop his empire, has not been to see "Ink," but many of his executives and journalists have. Former Sun editor Kelvin MacKenzie said the play had "the feel of a documentary."

Today, Murdoch owns the film studio 20th Century Fox, U.S. broadcaster Fox News, the New York Post, the Times of London — and the Sun, still Britain's best-selling newspaper.

But in recent years, Murdoch has faced setbacks. The revelation in 2011 that his News of the World tabloid had eavesdropped on the voicemails of a teenage murder victim forced him to close the newspaper and sent a former editor to prison.

British politicians, who for decades had sought the approval of the Murdoch press, grew warier.

Last week Britain's Conservative government stalled Murdoch's attempt to buy full control of broadcaster Sky, referring the deal to a regulator over concerns Murdoch is not a "fit and proper" media owner.

That makes "Ink" timely — and the latest example of Graham's skill at tapping into the zeitgeist.

His play "Privacy," which ran off-Broadway in a production starring Daniel Radcliffe, was an eye-opening exploration of the intrusive power of technology. Parliamentary drama "This House" explored flawed British democracy while humanizing often-derided politicians.

"Ink" helps explain social forces that made Donald Trump U.S. president last year and drove Britain to decide to leave the European Union.

"I started writing this way before Trump, way before Brexit," Graham said. "But I knew I wanted to capture what was clearly in the air about populism. I come from a working-class mining community in Nottinghamshire, a Sun-reading town ... so I wanted to speak to that. What it is to be in a working-class town that feels forgotten and isolated from the national conversation.

"And then, just by chance while I was writing it, those people got the power."

"Ink" runs at London's Duke of York's Theatre until Jan. 6.

Ryan Seacrest blaming Mariah Carey for bombing New Year’s Eve performance

Almost ten months after Mariah Carey’s infamous New Year’s Eve debacle, Ryan Seacrest is coming to the crew’s defense after the singer placed the blame for the mishap on Dick Clark Productions.

>> Read more trending news

“What was going through my head [in that moment] was and is: That crew, that team, that staff is the best in the business,” Seacrest recalled during in interview on “Watch What Happens Live” with Andy Cohen. “They put on the biggest live music events and they know what they’re doing, and I know how good they are at their jobs. So my reaction was, she was working with the best — I find it hard to believe they made big mistakes that night.”

The TV personality did admit that he, like Carey, was also having trouble hearing what was going on due to all of the noise around him from the night’s excitement.

“When it was happening, it was hard for me to see and hear because we’re in Times Square and there’s a lot going on,” he said. “I had to be told that something was going on and then try and find a monitor to react to, so I wasn’t quite sure what was happening, actually.”

>> Related: Two pop queens collide at dinner party, the internet completely loses it

During the disastrous performance, Carey was clearly having trouble hearing her backup vocals, so she removed her earpiece and simply walked around the stage not singing before leaving the stage. In the days that followed, she blamed Dick Clark Productions for the incident, claiming they “set [her] up to fail.”

Angela Missoni shows feather-light sheer knits in Milan

It's a season of celebration and commemoration at Milan Fashion Week, in its fourth day Saturday.

Angela Missoni marks 20 years as creative director at the family-owned and -run brand founded by her parents. Donatella Versace made an emotional tribute to her brother, fashion house creator Gianni Versace, to honor his contributions to the fashion world and his vision of female empowerment 20 years after he was slain. And Vogue Italia feted its new editor, Emanuele Farneti, with the party of the week inside a former customs station.

Here are some highlights of the womenswear previews for next spring and summer on day four in Milan, featuring Bottega Veneta and Missoni.

___

BOTTEGA VENETA INSPIRES HAPPINESS

Tomas Maier gave a youthful edge to the new Bottega Veneta collection, infusing the looks with metallic and beaded accents that gave sparkle to a rich color palette of rose, ocean-blue, lilac, moss and denim.

The combined men's and women's show illustrated Maier's careful bridging between heritage and modernity. To underline the point, the creative director invited this generation's supermodels to walk the runway and longtime brand icon Lauren Hutton as an honored guest.

Gigi Hadid rocked the runway in a denim dress covered with silver eyelets and a fringe that flew as she took a corner. Her sister Bella Hadid wore a white version of the same. Kaia Gerber — daughter of supermodel Cindy Crawford — walked in a satiny romper with a crisscross neck under an anorak. Kendall Jenner wore a seafoam green bodysuit under a trench.

The looks were utilitarian with an edge, and their understated colors allowed for easy combining for a lifetime of use. The technical prowess of the fashion house came out in a series of intricate snakeskin patchwork pieces that recalled cathedral stained glass, on jackets, belts, shoes and bags.

"Modernity is the way something is made," Maier told reporters backstage. "Modernity is not square and hard. It is how you conceive things and how you make them work."

Maier says his focus is on creating happiness, using beautiful colors and emphasizing comfort.

"Because things are a little tough for all of us, so we need something in the morning to get us going," the designer said.

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BOTTEGA'S FIRST SUPERMODEL, LAUREN HUTTON

Lauren Hutton graced the Bottega Veneta front row on Saturday holding a dusty rose version of the purse she memorably clutched in the 1980 film "American Gigolo."

By any measure, she is the fashion house's first supermodel.

"I picked this purse for Gigolo, not the wardrobers. I got to pick out all my own clothes back then. I almost always did, because I am so into fashion," the former model said backstage, wryly arching an eyebrow.

Hutton wore a 1940s-style rose-colored dress with beaded accents. She said she wore a blue version of the same in a 20-page spread that she just shot for "Vogue Italia" under its new editor, Emanuele Farneti. It will be on the newsstands in October.

"Things go so fast!" Hutton said of the quick shoot-to-newsstand turnaround. In that vein, she said she just finished shooting Amy Schumer's movie "I Feel Pretty" in 32 days.

"Everything is a different world now for an old granny," she laughs. "But thank God granny's out there! That's important."

____

THE MISSONI SUPERWOMAN

Angela Missoni's collection marking her 20th anniversary as creative director at her family's fashion house featured feather-light, often sheer, knits for a sleek silhouette.

Nothing projected power more than the matching knit bodysuits and superhero-style capes.

While Missoni may be most popularly associated with the zig-zag knit, the runway collection made amply clear the variety of patterns: vertical stripes, pretty eyelets, color-blocking, brand historic jacquards and even a Marilyn Monroe knit based on the Andy Warhol painting.

Colors started off in pale shades and got gradually stronger until they darkened to black.

The spring-summer womenswear collection also featured hot pants, leggings and gauchos along with pretty summer dresses with 1950-style skirts or halter tops. Big sun hats with arching brims added drama to the looks, especially when paired with long, clinging sheer knits.

"These are the lightest knits I have ever made," the designer said backstage.

For the first time, Missoni also included menswear alongside the women's looks, pairing sleeveless sunrise pattern knitwear with trousers, or a sunset pattern jacket with shorts. Scarves finished many of the men's looks.

This has been a big week for Missoni. She was honored earlier by amfAR for her contributions to raising money for AIDS research. And Sunday night, she hosts party for 900 to mark two decades since she took the creative reins from her mother, Rosita.

Formula 1 driver Lewis Hamilton was among those attending the runway show, held in a former factory yard under a tent of colorful foulards designed by American artist Rachel Hayes.

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