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Alcoholics Anonymous sues for return of 12-step manuscript

Alcoholics Anonymous is demanding the return of its 1939 original manuscript describing the "Twelve Step" program of recovery from alcoholism.

Alcoholics Anonymous World Services Inc. in New York state court last Thursday sued an Alabama man, Ken Roberts, who owns the manuscript, a New York art gallery and a California auction house.

The manuscript is to be sold June 8 at auction. The lawsuit said the manuscript was gifted to a man who left instructions for it to be given to Alcoholics Anonymous upon his death. But it never was.

Now, it is being advertised by Profiles in History, which plans to auction it in two weeks. Aron Gerson, a spokesman for the Los Angeles-area auction house, declined comment. A man who answered the phone at QuestRoyal Fine Art in Manhattan, where the manuscript was displayed over the weekend, said he could not comment.

On a web page devoted to the auction, Profiles in History described it as "The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous" and "The Bible to Millions," saying its 161 typed pages included handwritten edits by AA founders, including William Griffith Wilson, also known as Bill W. It said it had sold 30 million copies since 1939, been translated into 43 languages and has been ranked by the Library of Congress as the No. 1 non-fiction book that shaped America.

The auction house estimated it will sell for between $2 million and $3 million.

The lawsuit said the original working draft copy of the manuscript is "an original, historical document of unique importance." It said it "indisputably belongs" to Alcoholics Anonymous after Barry Leach, who received it from Wilson's widow, signed and notarized a letter in April 1979 saying it would belong to the organization upon his death. He died in 1985.

The lawsuit blamed "either extreme negligence or potentially wrongful actions" around the time of Leach's death for it never reaching Alcoholics Anonymous.

As a result, it said, the manuscript was sold at auction in June 2004 at Sotheby's to William A. Shenk for $1.57 million. The lawsuit said Roberts bought it at a Sotheby's auction in 2007 for $850,000 at a time when Alcoholics Anonymous was not aware of Leach's notarized letter.

The lawsuit said Roberts informed Alcoholics Anonymous on April 7 that he planned to sell the manuscript on June 8. A phone message left for Roberts was not immediately returned.

FCC: No punishment for late-night host Colbert's Trump joke

There will be no fine for Stephen Colbert's risque joke about President Donald Trump.

A Federal Communications Commission spokesman said Tuesday that the agency received "thousands" of complaints about the late-night host's May 1 show, so it reviewed the material as "standard operating procedure." It's the FCC's job to police obscene or indecent material on TV when it receives complaints.

The agency found that the joke, which involved Trump, Russian leader Vladimir Putin and a crude word for penis, did not warrant punishment.

Colbert's politically-tinged "Late Show," rife with Trump jokes, has become the most popular of the late-night circuit.

Ariana Grande fans tremble as they recall Manchester attack

Rihanna Hardy had been excited about seeing Ariana Grande ever since she got her concert ticket as a Christmas gift. So when the day came, the 11-year-old left school a couple of hours early to make sure to get to Manchester Arena on time.

Her parents, Ryan and Shauna, took the afternoon off work, and the family drove the 140 miles (225 kilometers) from Newcastle to Manchester. They struggled to find the arena's multistory parking lot, and barely managed to buy Rihanna a black Ariana Grande tour sweatshirt before the concert started.

But what was supposed to be a special night for Rihanna and thousands of other young concertgoers turned into a tragedy when a suicide bomb blasted off just outside the cavernous hall. It killed 22 people, including an 8-year-old girl, and injured 59 — the deadliest attack in Britain in more than a decade.

"Poor Rihanna ... just kept asking every five or 10 seconds, 'Are we going to die?' Those were her exact words," her father said.

The family took their seats, close to the stage, just before the first of two supporting acts warmed up the crowd. The arena, which seats 21,000, was packed. Many clutched pink balloons and donned cat ears, like those the 23-year-old Grande is famous for wearing.

As the former star of the Nickelodeon series "Victorious" sang and danced her way through her set, the arena heated up. Young children and their parents glistened with sweat.

Then, as the concert ended, the horror began.

Just a few minutes after Grande finished her final song, "Dangerous Woman," blew a kiss to the audience and left the stage, the house lights came back on. People began filing toward the exits.

It was then that a suspect identified as 22-year-old Salman Abedi set off his suicide bomb in the foyer, near a road linking the venue to the city's railway station. Witnesses described seeing bolts and other bits of metal at the scene of the blast.

The boom echoed through Manchester Arena, shaking the floor with a hollow thud. Thousands of Ariana Grande fans — many of them youngsters accompanied by their parents — fell silent for a few seconds, in shock. Then the screaming started.

"I thought we were going to die. It was just horrendous," said Rihanna's mother.

Panic descended on the hall.

"It was just sheer chaos," said Kirstyn Pollard, who had a seat close to the stage. "People were trying to get off the balconies. It was awful."

Melissa Andre and two friends clambered over a security barrier in their rush to get out. It was already dented from other concertgoers fleeing the arena, as officials tried frantically to restore order.

"A security official was on stage saying 'Be calm, everything's fine,'" said Andre, 20. "I think they were just saying that to calm people down before they got out. And then when we got out, the alarm went off."

Police were called in at 10:33 p.m. As they arrived, a smell hung in the air — a bit like smoke, a bit like burning, nothing the Ryans had ever smelled before.

"I can't describe it. It was a really awful smell," Shauna Hardy said. "And there was just alarms going off, police everywhere. Sirens everywhere. People running, screaming. It was just crazy. Absolutely crazy."

Ryan Hardy desperately tried to slow down his wife and daughter as they left the arena, worried they might fall in the crush of people fleeing the carnage. They emerged from the stifling heat of the concert hall into the cool night.

"Everyone else was running out the entrance while he was walking out the entrance," Rihanna — still wearing her Ariana Grande sweatshirt — said Tuesday, looking up proudly at her dad.

Police and paramedics rushed to aid the wounded, wrapping some in foil blankets to keep them warm and ward off shock. Others hobbled off into the night, their clothes torn and stained by blood.

Charlotte Fairclough, 14, was part of the rush to flee.

"Everyone was like scrambling over each other," she said. "Quite a few people got knocked over. It was like just a race to get out."

When Charlotte got out, she immediately called her mom, Stacy, who was waiting to pick up her daughter and a friend. The she called again to say she'd heard a big bang.

Her mother, at the time, wasn't too worried.

"I'd heard fireworks earlier in the night, so I wasn't too concerned to start with," she said.

The full scale of the attack did not hit home until they turned on the news at a hotel.

The Hardy family escaped unscathed, but the shock of the night endured even as they tried to sleep it off. When a door slammed loudly at half past five in the morning, Rihanna got frightened.

"There are a lot of people killed, a lot of people injured, a lot of people missing," Shauna Hardy said. "And we just feel so so lucky that we are all together."

____

Associated Press writer Rob Harris in Manchester contributed.

Hemingway house changes hands, still off limits to public

Ownership of the Idaho house where Ernest Hemingway wrote some of his last works before killing himself in the main entryway in 1961 has changed hands but will stay off limits to the public.

The Nature Conservancy transferred the two-story, 2,500-square-foot house in the Idaho resort town of Ketchum earlier this month as a gift to the Community Library, a privately funded public library.

Library officials say an apartment in the house will be renovated for a residency program for visiting writers, scholars and artists starting next year.

"What having the Hemingway house does for the Community Library is situate our Idaho community in this global network," executive director Jenny Emery Davidson said Tuesday.

Hemingway aficionados frequently take to what's called the Hemingway trail, which includes stops tied to the globe-trotting author's many adventures. The area in Idaho is packed with such areas, including Hemingway's grave in the Ketchum cemetery.

The house has many of the author's personal possessions, and some will be put on display at the Sun Valley Museum of History, Davidson said. They include a bull's tail given to Hemingway following a bullfight in Spain, correspondence with locals Hemingway befriended and hunting paraphernalia, she said.

Hemingway owned the house from April 1959 until his suicide in July 1961 at age 61, when he feared that he had lost his ability to write to his standards, biographers say. The author worked on "A Moveable Feast" and "The Dangerous Summer" at the house, which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2015.

The author's wife, Mary Hemingway, who died in 1986, gave the house to the Nature Conservancy but with restrictions that precluded operating it as a public museum. The group used the house as a field office before outgrowing it.

Owning the house has never been a good fit for the conservation organization dedicated to preserving the kind of wild places that drew Hemingway to Idaho. That made it difficult for the group to justify the annual upkeep on the house built in 1953 above a tree-lined river with views of snow-topped mountains.

The 13.9 acres (5.6 hectares) included with the house are worth millions, but the house is small and outdated compared with the mega-mansions common in the area.

The Community Library has a base of wealthy locals to draw from to help pay for what it estimates is $1.5 million in annual expenses for upkeep and its plans for the house.

The Carr Foundation supplied the initial money to make the transfer of the Hemingway home feasible. Davidson declined to say how much philanthropist Gregory Carr, who was born in Idaho and owns a home in the Ketchum area, donated.

"People are interested in Hemingway, but the people who have stepped up so far are people who care about Idaho," Davidson said.

She also said the home is a perfect fit for the library, which has a regional history division and is keen to promote the area's literary icon. She said it's even possible new insights could be discovered.

"We have not told the story of Hemingway and the American West as we could," she said.

The home will not be opened to the public like Hemingway's other homes in Key West, Florida, and Havana, Cuba, but there will be some access, Davidson said.

"We plan to treat it as a home," she said. "Sometimes people invite small groups of people to their home."

The Nature Conservancy didn't respond to a request for comment from The Associated Press on Tuesday.

With an arched brow, Roger Moore found humor in Bond, life

Sir Roger Moore always made sure to laugh at himself before the audience could.

With a mere arch of an eyebrow, Moore, whose wit was dryer than James Bond's martinis, could convey a skepticism of his accidental profession, disarming good looks and the suave characters he often played, from Bond to Simon Templar, all while saving the day and charming a scantily clad girl in the process.

Sporting a posh accent and square jaw, Moore, who died Tuesday at age 89, looked the part of a movie star and a debonair international spy. But beneath the surface, the policeman's son from South London, a sickly child and plump kid who always chose a joke over a street fight, saw the inherent ridiculousness of 007 — and left an indelible mark on the role, and a generation, because of it.

"You can't be a real spy and have everybody in the world know who you are and what your drink is," Moore often said. "That's just hysterically funny."

A large part of his charm is that Moore never set out to be an actor. As a teenager, on a lark, he tagged along with some friends doing crowd work on the Vivien Leigh and Claude Raines film "Caesar and Cleopatra" and caught the eye of someone who thought he should meet the director,

"He said I think you should be trained. I said, 'Oh how wonderful,'" Moore recalled in an interview. "So I rushed home and told my mother I was going to be Stewart Granger."

Stardom did not come immediately, however. Moore toiled as a working actor, in television and films in the UK, and then in the U.S. as a studio contract player for MGM before breaking through in a few television roles, in "Maverick" and then "The Saint." The long-running show "The Saint" about the witty and charming romantic hero Simon Templar, many noted, was not unlike Moore himself — and would inform how he chose to play James Bond over the course of seven films, starting with "Live and Let Die" from 1973 and ending with "A View to a Kill" in 1985.

For many, "The Spy Who Loved Me," from 1977, is one of the greatest Bond films, and certainly the best for Moore — even though praise at the time was almost backhanded.

"Roger Moore is so enjoyably unflappable that you sometimes have to look closely to make sure he's still breathing," wrote critic Janet Maslin in the New York Times. "But his exaggerated composure amounts to a kind of backhanded liveliness. Though Mr. Moore doesn't compromise the character, he makes it amusingly clear that hedonism isn't all it's cracked up to be."

Moore knew his own shortcomings, and would joke about them readily. He liked to say that the difference between The Saint and James Bond was in the eyebrow.

"In 'The Saint' I did raise my eyebrow," Moore would say. "I don't think I ever raised my eyebrow in Bond ... except possibly when a bomb went off."

He spent a lot of his time talking about those eyebrows that some critics tried to lance him for, drolly explaining that he had only three emotions — one eyebrow raised, the other, or both.

"A lot of the time, I laugh at myself as a defense mechanism," Moore said, always aware that his "even features" were both an asset to stardom and an impediment to being considered a serious actor. There might have been some truth there. Though well-known, Moore never rose to prestige roles. Even in his most well-known part, as Bond, he was doomed to always be compared to his predecessor Sean Connery.

Moore accepted this fate with good humor, insisting throughout his life that Connery's Bond, more macho and a killer, is the definitive and best interpretation.

In fact, most of his accolades, including his knighthood, came from his work off-screen humanitarian with UNICEF, which he found through his friend Audrey Hepburn.

"He does not regard everything as a laugh, but he would die rather than let you see," said his friend Michael Caine.

But he carried on the act, like a good soldier, throughout his life. Even recently, when asked what audiences can expect from his well-reviewed one-man stage show, Moore hesitated only to laugh.

"Two hours good sleep," he said.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr

Fox removes report from website about murdered DNC staffer

Fox News says it has removed from its website a speculative story about the 2016 murder of Democratic National Committee employee Seth Rich because it "was not initially subjected to the high degree of editorial scrutiny we require for all our reporting."

The report, published a week earlier, quoted a private investigator suggesting that Rich had some connection to Wikileaks and its leaks of Democratic National Committee emails during the last campaign.

Rich's family has said they don't believe their son, who was shot in July 2016 in Washington, gave any information to WikiLeaks. The investigator has since recanted his claim, and the independent researcher Politifact.com has said the notion that Rich was involved in the leak was flimsy and illogical.

No arrests have been made in the shooting. Washington police have said they think Rich was killed in a random robbery attempt, but conspiracy theories have emerged about his death.

Although Fox removed the story from its website, its statement did not say the story was wrong. The network said it will continue to investigate the story and provide updates as warranted.

The network had no other comment beyond the published statement on Tuesday. It also made no mention of Fox News Channel star Sean Hannity, who has done stories about the case on his prime-time television show.

Hannity said last week that he doesn't believe Rich was killed as part of a robbery attempt.

"I am not backing off asking questions even though there's an effort that nobody talk about Seth Rich," he said.

On Tuesday, Hannity continued to stick by his claims, tweeting a link to a website promoting the conspiracy theory.

Boston museum doubles reward for stolen artwork to $10M

A Boston museum has doubled its reward to $10 million for information that leads to the return of 13 works of art stolen more than two decades ago in the largest art heist in U.S. history.

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum's board of trustees announced the increase Tuesday.

"It is our fervent hope that by increasing the reward, our resolve is clear that we want the safe return of the works to their rightful place and back in public view," said Steve Kidder, president of the museum's board.

Two men dressed in Boston police uniforms gained entrance to the museum on March 18, 1990, by telling the security guard at the watch desk that they were responding to a report of a disturbance, according to authorities.

The guard did not follow museum policy and allowed the men into the museum. The thieves handcuffed the museum's two guards on duty and put them in separate areas of the museum's basement.

The suspects robbed the museum of about $500 million worth of masterpieces that included works by Rembrandt, Manet and Vermeer. The FBI told The Associated Press in 2015 that two suspects are deceased.

"Typically stolen masterpieces are either recovered soon after a theft or a generation later," said Anthony Amore, the museum's security director. "We remain optimistic that these works will ultimately be recovered."

In 1997, the museum increased its reward from $1 million to $5 million. The new $10 million reward is available immediately but expires at midnight Dec. 31.

Amore said anyone with information should contact the museum directly. The museum guarantees complete confidentiality, he said.

Broadway's box office coffers soars but attendance retreats

On Broadway, there's great financial news to sing about but a sour note amid the flush times: Box offices are enjoying the highest grossing season in history but attendance has dipped after four consecutive seasons of gains.

The Broadway League, the national trade association for the Broadway industry, said Tuesday that box offices reported a record total gross of $1.45 billion for the season that began May 23, 2016, and ended Sunday— up 5.5 percent from the $1.37 billion earned the previous season.

The trade association for theater owners, operators and producers said attendance was up to 13.27 million ticket buyers, down 0.4 percent from the 13.32 million the season before and despite more offerings.

The new numbers come during a season that saw a new theater — the Hudson Theatre — joining the 40 existing ones. It also saw the average ticket price soar from $97.33 last season to $113.85 this time.

A total of 45 shows opened during the season. There were 20 new musicals, 20 plays and five special events. Last season saw 39 shows open.

It was an unpredictable season, heavy on revivals and not always kind to visiting Hollywood celebs. Sally Field returned in a stripped-down production of "The Glass Menagerie" and got a Tony nomination but reviews were poor and it struggled to earn more than half its weekly potential, closing early.

Cate Blanchett, an Oscar-winner making her Broadway debut in Anton Chekhov's "The Present" and earning a Tony nomination in the process, didn't sell out her theater each week — not by a long shot. Nor has Glenn Close, in a widely praised revival of "Sunset Boulevard."

Diane Lane, in a revival of "The Cherry Orchard," often saw her show's weekly take dip below 50 percent of its potential. And interest in the Liev Schreiber-led "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" seemed to plummet as the run went on.

Bette Midler, naturally, has packed audiences into the Shubert Theatre to see her in "Holly, Dolly!" and Jake Gyllenhaal earned praise and box office clout in his sold-out revival of "Sunday in the Park With George." Josh Groban helped make "Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812" a hit but it remains to be seen what happens to the show when he leaves in July.

One clear winner this season was "Dear Evan Hansen," a musical which centers on a profoundly lonely 17-year-old who fabricates a prior friendship with a classmate who has just committed suicide. The acclaimed musical has songs by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (recent Oscar winners for "City of Stars" from the movie "La La Land").

New plays, overall, have had a hard time this season, with "Sweat," ''A Doll's House, Part 2" and "Indecent" all struggling, although "Oslo" and "The Play That Goes Wrong" have done relatively well. "Significant Others," a drama with no stars, turned in one of the most underwhelming box office performances in years, at one point earning just 17 percent of its potential weekly earning.

Revivals of plays like "The Little Foxes," ''Six Degrees of Separation" and the Kevin Kline-led "Present Laughter" have done OK, while "Heisenberg" was a rare bright spot for plays in the fall and the celebrity-heavy revival of "The Front Page" was a financial smash.

Some new musicals — including "Bandstand," ''War Paint" and "Groundhog Day" — are fighting financial headwinds and "Amelie," led by "Hamilton" alum Phillipa Soo closed early. "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" has shrugged off mixed reviews to become a hit.

Some recent favorites like "Beautiful" and "Kinky Boots" have been chugging away but new revivals of two big, bombastic shows in "Miss Saigon" and "Cats" are doing only modestly well.

There were some nice surprises. The coming-of-age musical made from the film "A Bronx Tale" was an unlikely hit, attracting theater-goers who had previously made the now-closed "Jersey Boys" a destination. "Come From Away," the rare musical born in Canada and one dealing with 9/11, got a boost when Canadian premier Justin Trudeau came to cheer it on. "Anastasia," with no real stars, was packing them in.

"Waitress," the quirky and lovely musical whose arrival was somewhat overshadowed by "Hamilton" last season, proves to be resilient and popular, especially when songwriter Sarah Bareilles stepped into the heroine role herself and broke several box office records. "School of Rock," which also arrived last season, was doing fine in its second season.

___

Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

The top 10 audiobooks on Audible.com

Fiction

1. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, narrated by Michael York (Blackstone Audio, Inc.)

2. The Handmaid's Tale: Special Edition by Margaret Atwood, narrated by Claire Danes, author and full cast (Audible Studios)

3. The Jekyll Revelation by Robert Masello, narrated by Christopher Lane (Brilliance Audio)

4. We Are Legion (We Are Bob): Bobiverse, Book 1 by Dennis E. Taylor, narrated by Ray Porter (Audible Studios)

5. Devil in a Blue Dress: An Easy Rawlins Mystery by Walter Mosley, narrated by Michael Boatman (Audible Studios)

6. Alcatraz versus the Evil Librarians by Brandon Sanderson, narrated by Ramon De Ocampo (Recorded Books)

7. American Gods: The Tenth Anniversary Edition by Neil Gaiman, narrated by Ron McLarty, Daniel Oreskes and full cast (HarperAudio)

8. Into the Water by Paula Hawkins, narrated by Laura Aikman, Rachel Bavidge, Sophie Aldred, Daniel Weyman and Imogen Church (Penguin Audio)

9. Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman, narrated by Neil Gaiman (HarperAudio)

10. The Name of the Wind: Kingkiller Chronicles, Day 1 by Patrick Rothfuss, narrated by Nick Podehl (Brilliance Audio)

Nonfiction

1. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F(asterisk)ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life by Mark Manson, narrated by Roger Wayne (HarperAudio)

2. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by Neil deGrasse Tyson, narrated by the author (Blackstone Audio, Inc.)

3. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory by Caitlin Doughty, narrated by Caitlin Doughty (Recorded Books)

4. The 5 Second Rule: Transform Your Life, Work, and Confidence with Everyday Courage by Mel Robbins, narrated by the author (Mel Robbins Productions Inc.)

5. Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America by Firoozeh Dumas, narrated by Firoozeh Dumas (Audible Studios)

6. You Are a Badass at Making Money: Master the Mindset of Wealth by Jen Sincero, narrated by author (Penguin Audio)

7. Where Should We Begin? with Esther Perel Episode 1: I've Had Better (Audible Originals)

8. Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions by Brian Christian and Tom Griffiths, narrated by Brian Christian (Brilliance Audio)

9. The Better Angels of Our Nature by Steven Pinker, narrated by Arthur Morey (Brilliance Audio)

10. Ponzi Supernova by Steve Fishman (Audible Originals)

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The top 10 books on Apple's iBooks-US

Rank, Book Title by Author Name, ISBN, Publisher

1. Into the Water by Paula Hawkins - 9780735211216 - (Penguin Publishing Group)

2. Surrender by Helen Hardt - No ISBN Available - (Waterhouse Press)

3. 16th Seduction by James Patterson & Maxine Paetro - 9780316553452 - (Little, Brown and Company)

4. The Fix by David Baldacci - 9781455586554 - (Grand Central Publishing)

5. No Middle Name by Lee Child - 9780399593581 - (Random House Publishing Group)

6. Buttons & Pain by Penelope Sky - 9781536531039 - (Self)

7. The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood - 9780547345666 - (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

8. Golden Prey by John Sandford - 9780399184581 - (Penguin Publishing Group)

9. Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon - 9780553496666 - (Random House Children's Books)

10. Same Beach, Next Year by Dorothea Benton Frank - 9780062390806 - (William Morrow)

(copyright) 2017 Apple Inc.

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