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President Trump’s Caribbean estate selling for $16.9 million

President Trump’s St. Martin estate, Chateau Des Palmiers, has run into some issues selling since being listed in May.

Since its initial listing for $28 million on Sotheby’s International Reality, the price for the estate has dropped more than $11 million to $16.9 million, reports Business Insider.

Chateau Des Palmiers is a beachfront property that contains 11 bedrooms and 12 bathrooms. A listing on 7th Heaven Properties provides details about the property for potential buyers:

Located in a highly exclusive gated enclave a direct beachfront location, the world-class residence comprises an ocean side villa, a garden side villa and a manager’s house, plus a wide range of amenities, including: a huge heated pool, an open air and air conditioned fitness center, a tennis court, and covered outdoor bar, billiards and dining areas.

Trump purchased the property for an undisclosed amount in 2013.

Wells Fargo customers targeted in nationwide scam

A new scam is targeting Wells Fargo Bank customers across the country.

According to the Henry County Police Department in Georgia, residents in Henry County and around the nation are receiving recorded messages informing them that Wells Fargo has locked down their accounts, and they need to call an 855 area code number to resolve the matter. 

>> Read more trending news

Once you call the number, you are asked for your Social Security number, date of birth, ZIP code, expiration date on your card and your PIN. 

Police say that after you provide the information, the line goes dead. Police say to never give out information to any unsolicited caller

If you have questions about your account, call the number of the back of your debit or credit card. If you have gotten one of these calls, Wells Fargo is asking you to contact them immediately.

How long do black women have to work to earn as much as white men?

To earn as much as the average white man earned in one year, black women on average have to put in one year and eight months of work.

>> Read more trending news 

And Monday, July 31, known as Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, is the date into 2017 that black women had to work to catch up to what their white male counterparts earned in 2016 alone.

Twitter users, including several notable leaders and celebrities, took to the social media platform Monday to address the wide wage gap:

» RELATED: Delta says its pay for men and women is close to equal 

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, women in the United States working full-time and salaried jobs in 2016 earned approximately 20 percent less than what men in the same positions earned.

But that disparity is even worse for black women, who earn 17 percent less than their white female counterparts.

» RELATED: The U.S. doesn’t even crack the top 15 best countries for women 

Statistics show black women in particular are paid approximately 63 cents on the dollar compared to white, non-Hispanic men.

In a Fortune Magazine essay penned by professional tennis player Serena Williams on Monday, Williams calls on her fellow black women to reclaim those 37 cents.

» RELATED: Georgia among worst for women, ranking shows 

“The issue isn’t just that black women hold lower-paying jobs. They earn less even in fields of technology, finance, entertainment, law, and medicine.” she wrote. “Changing the status quo will take dedicated action, legislation, employer recognition, and courage for employees to demand more. In short, it’s going to take all of us. Men, women, of all colors, races and creeds to realize this is an injustice. And an injustice to one is an injustice to all.”

Williams also included surprising findings from a SurveyMonkey poll, including that 69 percent of black women perceive a pay gap, while only 44 percent of white men recognize there’s a pay-gap issue.

“Black women: Be fearless. Speak out for equal pay. Every time you do, you’re making it a little easier for a woman behind you. Most of all, know that you’re worth it. It can take a long time to realize that. It took me a long time to realize it. But we are all worth it. I’ve long said, ‘You have to believe in yourself when no one else does,’ she wrote. “Let’s get back those 37 cents.”

Read Williams’ full essay at Fortune.com.

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and her global Lean In organization, which focuses on “empowering women to achieve their ambitions,” have also teamed up with small businesses in Richmond, Virginia; Indianapolis, Indiana; and Atlanta to offer 37 percent discounts to represent the pay gap for black women.

Should You Cash That Convenience Check?

MoneyTipsBy Ben LuthiIt's not every day that you get a blank check in the mail, but when you do, think twice before filling it out. Credit card companies often send out these "convenience checks" ­ tied to your credit card account to encourage you to spend more. But should you use them? How convenience checks work When you need to make a purchase, fill in the blank check with the amount, and sign it. When the merchant cashes your check, the amount is charged to your credit card. Some banks allow you to request convenience checks, but they mostly show up unannounced. You may get several checks on one card account and never receive any on others; it's all up to the banks. Convenience checks often offer a 0% APR promotion lasting 6-18 months. You can use the check to pay off another credit card, buy something or just deposit it in your checking account. Situations where doing this would make sense include: You want to pay off a credit card with a balance transfer but don't want to apply for a new card. You're paying for a product or service but the merchant doesn't accept credit cards. You need to finance a large purchase but can't or don't want to pay it off immediately. The checks typically expire after a month or two, and there may be a cap on how much of your credit limit you can use. If it doesn't list a maximum, your cap would be whatever available credit you have up to the credit limit on your card. When you use a check, you'll see the transaction show up on your credit card account as usual. If there's a fee tied to the check, then that will show up separately. Convenience checks do not generate rewards like regular purchases. Check the terms Before you write the check, understand what you're getting yourself into. While you may be getting a 0% APR deal, that feature usually doesn't come free. Often, the credit card issuer will charge a fee based on the check amount ­– anywhere from 1 to 5 percent. The paperwork that comes with the checks should also let you know whether it's a true 0% APR offer or a deferred-interest offer. For example, it's deferred interest if the terms say, "pay no interest if paid in full." If it is deferred interest, you have to pay off the full balance before the promotion is over. Otherwise, you'll get charged interest on the full original balance. With true 0% APR offers, you'll only get charged interest on the balance left over after the promotion ends. When Using Credit Card Convenience Checks is a good idea "If used to pay off debt, convenience checks that come with low promotional rates work similarly to a balance transfer," says Matt Freeman, Head of Credit Card Products at Navy Federal Credit Union. "However, similar to balance transfers, consumers need to keep an eye on any transaction fees." Doing a balance transfer works best if you have the means to pay it off in full before the promotional period ends. It's also a good idea to have an established emergency fund in case something unexpected comes up. If you plan to use the convenience checks to make a large purchase, do so only if you need the item now and will have the cash to pay it off soon. When Using Credit Card Convenience Checks is a bad idea Even if you do have a goal to pay off the balance in full before the promotion ends, an unexpected expense can derail your plan. If you don't have an established emergency fund, you're taking a big risk. Using a convenience check is also a bad idea if it doesn't offer a true 0% APR promotion. Deferred-interest promotions are expensive if you don't pay the balance in full by the end. It's also not a good idea to use a convenience check if the transaction fee is high or you don't have a clear plan to pay it off before the promotional period ends. Keep your credit in mind Like any purchase or balance transfer, a convenience check uses up some of your available credit on the card. If you use too much, it could spike your credit utilization and drop your credit score. "Credit utilization ratio accounts for about 30 percent of your total credit score," says Freeman. "If you use a convenience check to pay down existing credit card balances, it should have little to no impact. However, if you use it to pay for a large ticket item, you're raising your credit utilization ratio and ultimately lowering your credit score." Experts recommend keeping your credit utilization below 30 percent to avoid a negative credit impact. You can check your credit score and read your credit report for free within minutes using Credit Manager by MoneyTips. Should you use your convenience checks? If the terms are favorable and you have a payoff plan, convenience checks can be a great tool to help you pay off high-interest debt or make a large purchase. If the terms aren't good – for example, deferred interest, no 0% APR period or a high fee – you may want to consider some alternatives. A balance transfer card can help you pay down high-interest debt, and a personal loan can help cover a large purchase. Photo ©iStockphoto.com/cstar55 Originally Posted at: https://www.moneytips.com/should-you-cash-that-convenience-checkDoes Your Credit Card Limit Measure UpWhat Happens When You Go Over Your Credit Limit?Why Are Millennials Avoiding Credit Cards?

Power Of Attorney 101

MoneyTipsPerhaps you've heard the phrase "Power of Attorney" on a TV lawyer show, or even from a real lawyer. Ever wonder what it means? What is Power of Attorney? A Power of Attorney (POA) is a document granting one person or organization (typically called an agent or attorney-in-fact) the authority to act on the behalf of another person. POAs can be general and broad in scope or limited to specific aspects such as health-care decisions or financial management. A POA is often used to outline plans in case you become incapacitated and are unable to handle your own affairs. In that case, a POA is called a durable power of attorney since it continues beyond your incapacitation. It is important that your agent for the POA be a reliable individual whom you can trust. Agents are expected to look out for your best interests and must not abuse the powers that you have given them. You can revoke your POA at any time by notifying your agent in writing and collecting all the existing copies of the POA. You may also need to notify agencies and financial institutions that the POA has been revoked. Once you have signed a POA, you can continue to make your own decisions until the conditions that trigger the POA happen (such as incapacitation). An attorney is not necessary to create a POA, but it is usually wise to consult with one. The POA defines the powers that are to be given to the agent and the conditions under which they are valid (such as durability). It is very important to write the POA precisely as per your wishes to ensure that they are carried out properly. Financial POAs are usually set up for an agent to take care of day-to-day decisions as well as major financial ones in case you are unable to make these decisions for yourself. They could include bill paying, tax obligations, disposition of property and assets, or directing investments. What You Need to Know About Being Granted Power of Attorney What if you are on the other end of a POA and named as an agent for another person? Once you assume the POA for another person, you have a fiduciary responsibility to that person to act in his or her best interests. The first item of business is to read the POA and make sure that you fully understand the powers that are being granted to you. The POA document and applicable state laws outline and define your powers. Note that you are obligated to carry out the directions in the document, even if you believe that one of those directions should be done differently. If you do not think you can carry it out, ask your principal to find another agent. When possible, continue to involve the principal in the financial decisions. It is extremely important to keep the principal's finances separate from yours and to keep meticulous records to track the principal's finances. As an agent, you must avoid conflicts of interest or even the appearance of such — not easy to do when you are the agent for a close friend or relative. When a principal's government benefits such as Social Security are involved, you will not be able to manage them as the agent without a special appointment by the agency. There may be a separate representative payee for these benefits. Co-agents are not uncommon, and co-agent relationships are sometimes directly spelled out in the POA. Regardless of how co-agents are designated, you are obligated to work with the co-agent to maintain the best interests of the principal. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has more details on your responsibilities and options in case you are asked to become an agent. See their pamphlet, "Managing Someone Else's Money" for more information. POAs are important, powerful documents that are not to be taken lightly whether you are the principal or the agent. Set up your POA carefully with appropriate legal assistance. If you are named as an agent, make sure you take your POA responsibilities seriously and be diligent in executing them. Treat the principal as you would want to be treated. Let the free Retirement Planner by MoneyTips help you calculate when you can retire without jeopardizing your lifestyle. Photo ©iStockphoto.com/Creativeye99 Originally Posted at: https://www.moneytips.com/power-of-attorney-101Estate Planning for the Rest of UsDigital Estate Planning Sites8 Important Financial Steps for Widows/Widowers to Take

Many Americans Don't Know Their Credit Score

MoneyTipsDo you know your credit score? Nearly 30% of people in a recent MoneyTips survey admitted that they didn't know this important financial metric. In addition, more than half of the people surveyed earning less than $30,000 annually didn't know their score at all. MoneyTips conducted an exclusive online survey in June of 410 people on the topic of credit. 71% of the respondents said that they knew their credit score, while 29% admitted that they didn't know. Less than 53% of adults under 30 said they knew their score, as compared to more than 75% of older adults. And 52.9% of those making $30,000 or less annually didn't know this key number. "It's no surprise that the youngest demographic aren't completely on top of their credit scores," remarked National Financial Educators Founder and Chief Education Officer Adam Carroll. "Many recent college graduates are being granted forbearance and deferment on student loans, which creates a 'kick the can down the road' mentality on that obligation. The effect on their credit score, meanwhile, can impact what they pay for car loans, whether or not they get apartments, and sometimes if they get the desired job offer. It's a critical number to know at this (or any) stage of your life." Those surveyed were asked the last time they checked their credit score, and more than 4 out of 10 (43.9%) said they had checked it within the last month. The complete results: While 71% said they knew their credit score, less than 65% had even checked their score within the last 6 months! Since scores can change frequently, it's hard to imagine that all of those people who said they knew their scores truly did. "You should check your credit report quite frequently, because it's a constantly changing thing," recommends Personal Finance Expert and Author Jordan Goodman. "You can't say, 'Oh I saw my score six months ago, so I am fine.'" You can check your credit score and read your credit report for free within minutes using Credit Manager by MoneyTips. The only age group in which more than half checked their credit score within the last month was the oldest. 51.2% of the people 70+ were diligent about checking, compared to less than 40% of the 18-29 year-olds. While none of the seniors admitted never checking their credit score, a whopping 21.8% of the 18-29 group did. "Taking care of that credit report and those credit scores are important throughout your life, because as you do business every day it can come into play," says Rod Griffin, Director of Public Education for Experian. "When a young person is 17 or 18 years old, they are about to go out on their own, it might be a good idea to help them begin to establish a credit history." Griffin continues: "Establishing it early will help ensure that ... they'll be able to get the apartment they need, they'll be able to buy that car to get to and from work, all of those things that a credit report will be helpful for." When asked, "For those who don't check regularly, why not?" respondents were given the choices: While more than half said that they did check scores regularly, 15.4% believed it wasn't important, 13.2% weren't sure how, and 11% believed it was too much of a hassle. An additional 8.3% believed that checking your credit score lowers it, which is not correct. More than 23% of adults under 30 weren't sure how to check their credit scores. Although a recent Experian survey revealed that women have better credit habits than men do, more than 16% of women weren't sure how to check their credit scores, as compared to less than 10% of men. Concluded Adam Carroll, "With rampant credit card fraud schemes occurring today, the likelihood of something derogatory showing up on your credit report is significant. Even erroneous filings to your credit report can cause your score to plummet if left unchecked. Making sure your report is clean and clear from any errors could save you tens of thousands in the long run." You can check your credit score and read your credit report for free within minutes using Credit Manager by MoneyTips. Originally Posted at: https://www.moneytips.com/many-americans-do-not-know-their-credit-score/921Credit-Reporting Agencies5 Things You Don't Know about Your Credit ScoreHow To Read Your Credit Report

Seniors Win in Small Business

What’s an encore entrepreneur? It might look a lot like you.

These are people who might be starting a business for the first time as they near retirement age. Or, you may be retired already...

Florida eatery closed by roach infestation tries to hide health warning with sign

JACKSONVILLE BEACH, Fla. – A Florida restaurant was caught trying to cover up a health inspector’s sign after it was shut down by a cockroach infestation, according to the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation.

>> Read more trending news

Inspectors forced Jaxon Social in in Jacksonville Beach to close on July 18 after they found 23 live roaches and 35 dead roaches in the kitchen.

“It’s eat up with roaches,” said former Jaxon Social cook Brian Lee.

A former employee later sent ActionNewsJax.com a photo that showed a handwritten sign on the restaurant’s door. It covered the orange health notice left by inspectors.

The handwritten sign said, “Closed for technical difficulties.”

Officials said an inspector found the covered sign during a recent follow-up inspection. Kathleen Keenan, deputy director of communications for DBPR, said a division inspector spoke to the restaurant’s operator, and the health notice has since been properly displayed.

The restaurant has undergone at least seven inspections since it was closed. An inspector determined as recently as Wednesday that there were still too many live roaches to reopen the restaurant.

>> Read more Floridoh! stories

“If you open one of the refrigerator doors and pop open the seal, they fall out like,” Lee said. “It’s like you’ve torn the corner off a bag of Skittles. It’s disgusting.”

The restaurant’s owner said exterminators were brought into the restaurant Wednesday and that it should reopen after another inspection Friday.

The owner said that the restaurant be re-branded before it opens again.

According to Department of State records, the restaurant is licensed as KC Crave, LLC.

How To Find Free Money Online

MoneyTipsLife can get hectic fast and people can easily allow certain tasks to fall through the cracks. Unfortunately, sometimes we never remember to complete those tasks -- or even what those tasks were -- and it can end up costing you your hard-earned money. For example, you may forget to leave a forwarding address with an old utility company that still has your deposit on file, or forget about a retirement account you had with an old employer. The good news is that websites exist to help you find and claim your forgotten money. MissingMoney.com MissingMoney.com allows you to search public records to find money that may belong to you. Searching for money is a simple process. Simply enter your first name, last name and the state in which you want to search. Missing Money will then return a list of unclaimed money that could potentially belong to you. Missing Money will list the name associated with the money on record, the last known address of the person, where the money is held, who reported the money and a rough estimate of the amount of money being held, if available. If you find money that you believe belongs to you, click on the line item, read the instructions then click on the "Yes, I Can Claim" button. Follow the instructions on the next page and you may finally be reunited with your money even though you're still in your pajamas. Looking for Life Insurance Policies Life insurance exists to help families survive financially after the passing of a loved one. Unfortunately, many loved ones are not aware of all of the insurance policies a person may have taken out during their lifetime. Unless you are able to find paperwork for the policy while searching through a loved one's estate, you may never find out about a missing life insurance policy that requires payment to the beneficiary. Luckily, an option exists to help you search for policies of which you are not aware. For individual life insurance policies (not group policies like those included in benefits at your workplace), MIB.com's lost life insurance website provides a great resource. MIB charges a $75 fee to use their Policy Locator Service, but the small fee could pay off should they find an unclaimed life insurance policy that benefits you. Old Retirement Plans Often Get Forgotten Another hectic period in our lives occurs when switching from one employer to another. Most of us worry about moving their family, getting settled into a new job and figuring out the benefits that the new company offers. However, many people forget about retirement plans at their old workplaces, especially if they did not contain a substantial amount of money. If you have lost track of a pension that you were entitled to at a previous employer, first try contacting your old employer for information regarding the plan. If that does not work, you can try searching the Employee Benefits Security Administration's website or the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation's website to find your plan. If you have lost track of another type of retirement plan, such as a 401(k) or an IRA, then you should search the National Registry of Unclaimed Retirement Benefits. Searching these websites for unclaimed money that rightfully belongs to you is a relatively painless process that should only take a few minutes of your time. The next time you're bored, check them out. It could be more rewarding than googling "skateboard fail videos"! Let the free Retirement Planner by MoneyTips help you calculate when you can retire without jeopardizing your lifestyle. Photo ©iStockphoto.com/LdF Originally Posted at: https://www.moneytips.com/how-to-find-free-money-online7 Top Retirement RoadblocksRetirement Plans 101SIMPLE IRAs 101

Legally Renege On Your Mortgage

MoneyTipsCongratulations! You just signed the closing papers on your mortgage loan. Terrifying, isn't it? Are you having second thoughts about your decision? If you have just signed the closing papers for a home purchase, it's too late. You have made your commitment. However, in some cases with refinancing or a home equity line of credit (HELOC), you have a short rescission period in which you may back out of the deal without penalty. The Truth in Lending Act (TILA) created the right of rescission in certain circumstances, allowing borrowers three full days to reconsider their decision and rescind the deal with no questions asked. Three things must take place before the three-day period begins: you must have signed the promissory note, received the Closing Disclosure form that summarizes the terms and conditions of your mortgage loan, and received two copies of the notice that explains your rights of rescission. Rescission applies to refinances on owner-occupied homes only (no rentals, vacation homes, or investment properties), and only when the refinancing is through a different mortgage lender than the one that provided the original mortgage loan. An exception is a cash-out refinance with the original lender, where a rescission period is available on the cash-out portion alone. Rescission is always available on a HELOC with one exception: it is not applicable when the entire credit line amount is used for a purchase transaction (such as a second mortgage). You must submit your rescission form in writing to the lender, using either the form provided with the explanation of rescission rights or a similar letter. Keep a copy of your letter and note when the letter was mailed in order to prove that your notification was within the three-day window. The first day is considered to be the first business day after the last of the three events above are completed, including Saturdays but not Sundays. Legal public holidays are also excluded. You have until midnight on the third day to rescind (but keep in mind you will need to provide proof that the written notice was at least mailed on time, a difficult task if you decide at 11pm on the third day). When the right of rescission is exercised, the lender has twenty days to refund most of the fees associated with the loan and give up claim to the property in question. The only fees that are not subject to refund are those paid by the borrower to a third party that is not considered to be part of the credit transaction (for example, building permits). Application and processing fees, appraisal and title fees, brokerage fees, and other fees directly related to the loan must be refunded. If your disclosure form or rights of rescission notice was not received at closing or contained incorrect information, it's possible that you can rescind your loan well past the three-day period (up to three years according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau). Find legal representation to explore your options in this case. Before signing a closing document, you should make sure that you have received the proper Closing Disclosure form and rescission rights document and have had enough time to read and understand them. Changing your mind that late in the home buying process poses many difficulties, and it puts the lender in a difficult position – but it is your right. Think about it carefully, but exercise your right of rescission if necessary. Just make sure that you do it in writing and within the proper timeframe. MoneyTips is happy to help you get free refinance quotes from top lenders. Photo ©iStockphoto.com/BrianAJackson Originally Posted at: https://www.moneytips.com/legally-renege-on-your-mortgageClosing your Home LoanThe Loan Estimate and the Closing DisclosureBuyers Beware – Mortgage Paperwork Has Increased
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